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Cooking brown rice in 40 minutes

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Ideas, Suggestions, and Information » Cooking brown rice in 40 minutes « Previous Next »

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kristy
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Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 12:35 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was having a lot of trouble getting brown rice to cook in only 40 minutes but I finally figured out my problem. I was using my cheap cookware and it just didn't work - it would still be too crunchy after an hour. I finally remembered my cast iron deep frying skillet with lid that I had pushed to the back of the cabinet when I got too weak to lift it. Using the cast iron pot, brown rice cooks perfectly in only 40 minutes. Yeah!! I have to get my son to maneuver the pot for me but I use it every time now.
Melinda
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Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 4:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use a rice steamer for mine....well, when I was able to eat brown rice. Normally it suggests to cook/steam for about 40-60 minutes depending on amount or rice used, but I tried an experiment and cooked it for only 15-20 minutes and it came out a little al dente - I found I actually liked it that way but I still had a slight reaction so I haven't tried it again since. I think I might try it again and see. You can probably cook it the way you mentioned for less time too - It'd be al dente but less glutamates released.
kristy
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Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 7:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Melinda, I used a food steamer in the beginning because I thought it would be easier but it had to cook 1.5 hours. Granted I was trying to cook big amounts at a time to freeze, but I had reactions with that method's results as well. It was a food steamer and not a "rice cooker" but I didn't think it mattered since it gave instructions in the manual for cooking rice.

I am just surprised that the cookware makes such a huge difference in the cooking of rice. I have been cooking since I was a child and never knew cookware made that much difference. I guess because I just cooked with whatever my Mom had and used it the way she did that I never saw a comparison. The cast iron pot that I use for cooking rice now was actually a gift from Mom for frying chicken....
Jennifer
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Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 - 7:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ah, good cookware makes a HUGE difference. For some things you can get away with the cheap stuff. Like boiling pasta.

Does anyone think aluminum rice cooker pots could be a problem? Mine is aluminum, and have wondered if it's not the best idea because of the Alzheimer's implications. Though I don't have reactions to rice unless it's been in the fridge more than 24 hours.

One way to make your rice cook FAST is to fry it first. Heat up a little oil (I don't see why butter wouldn't work) and heat it on medium to medium-hi, stirring, until you can smell it start to "brown", or get the nutty aroma. Then into the rice cooker, and I swear, it takes a little over half the time.

Jennifer
Deb A.
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Posted on Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 10:12 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's so tasty that way, too, Jennifer. I like to add some onion to the rice when I brown it...great as pilaf that way. If you add some celery, too, and any herbs you like, and then steam it, it can be turned into a fried rice meal by adding a little cooked meat or seafood, or scrambled eggs.
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 1:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fantastic idea....I never thought of frying the rice before cooking it. I think I will try it with the next batch. I want to try the onion but unfortunately my son would have a stroke. He hates onions in food almost as much as I love them. (I can get away with finely diced in some dishes but I think it would be too obvious in his rice.LOL)
Deb A.
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Posted on Friday, April 24, 2009 - 7:25 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The onion really makes, I think. Bet he wouldn't even notice a little minced onion. :-)
Dianne
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Posted on Sunday, May 03, 2009 - 2:49 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tried frying some rice and onion, then cooking it with broth I had saved in the freezer and boy was it good. Thanks for the idea of frying it first.
EmilyS
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Posted on Sunday, May 03, 2009 - 6:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you have to skip out on the onion, add a little minced garlic after you fry the rice. So yummy!
Dianne
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Posted on Monday, May 04, 2009 - 6:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That sounds really good too, I love garlic.
Deb A.
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Posted on Wednesday, May 06, 2009 - 9:17 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Made a Mongolian beef style dish and it turned out very well. Added about 1/4 cup of organic cane sugar to 1 lb. of raw ground beef (can use any meat) with some minced garlic, salt, pepper, and hot pepper flakes. Let stand for about 20 minutes. In oil, I sauted the beef and then added some green onions, 1 t. organic apple cider vinegar, 1/2 t. Chinese five spice, 1/4 t. of sesame seed oil, and some broccoli flowerets...just stir fried till almost tender...so good. You can add more heat or spices or sugar to taste..great with rice.
Dianne
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Posted on Wednesday, May 06, 2009 - 11:13 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

what is Chinese five spice?
Deb A.
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Posted on Wednesday, May 06, 2009 - 2:02 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is sold in most grocery stores and Chinese groceries. It consists of just 5 spices and no fillers. I buy the Sun Luck brand and it contains fennel, anise, ginger, licorice root, cinnamon and clove...that's six, but maybe they don't count the licorice root..):
Dianne
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Posted on Wednesday, May 06, 2009 - 6:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

wow, that's a lot of different flavors, I'll have to give it a try.
Jennifer
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Posted on Wednesday, May 06, 2009 - 9:16 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Also, if you have access to an Asian market, look for "Black Vinegar". I get the Koon Chun (or something like that) brand. I do OK with it, but if you're new to the diet you may react. The ingredients are a little suspect, but Balsamic vinegar is way worse for me (sulfites) based on the reactions I get. It's the Chinese version of Balsamic.

I use sake, black vinegar, garlic, ginger and salt for my base Chinese marinade. I swear it's just like restaurants.

Then I add the "secret ingredient" to customize the dish. I've figured out white pepper is for Kung-Pao chicken, and plum (or fig, whatever) jam for Mu-Shu pork/chicken. And it's all soy free!

Jennifer
Dianne
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Posted on Friday, May 08, 2009 - 7:09 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All good to know, thanks Jennifer.
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 10:50 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Aren't there any sulfites in sake? I do okay with most rice wine vinegars, come to think.
Jennifer
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Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 8:57 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No sulfites. In fact the brand I get states no preservatives & no sulfites. It's never given me a reaction and I have been known to imbibe on rather a lot on occasion. Wine or beer...has made me throw up after only one, without even really feeling the "fun" effects.

I did see on Carol's page that sometimes MSG is added to sake to hide the bitterness. I haven't run across that, but here in Northern California, there's a lot of food snobs, plus a local sake brewery in Berkley. I can't imagine anyone would dare adulterate a local product. They treat it the only way they know how here...just like a wine list!

In the Midwest, I can definitely see that happening, especially if the bottle has gone "off" a little.
viv
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Posted on Saturday, September 05, 2009 - 7:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Melinda thanks for your post. I can't tolerate brown rice at all. I thought it was me getting paranoid. Is there a list anywhere that included ALL foods with gultamate potential problems? I can't seem to handle even slightly heated milk either.

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