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Food Lists Showing Glutamate Levels

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Ideas, Suggestions, and Information » Food Lists Showing Glutamate Levels « Previous Next »

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Melinda
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, October 26, 2008 - 6:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello all,

I have come across two sources to check the nutritional analysis of foods - in which you can check to see what the levels of Glutamate(glutamic acid) are as well as Aspartate (aspartic acid)in the food. The only thing is, I am not sure what is considered "dangerous" levels for those sensitive to msg. You can compare foods you know are high in glutamates to those foods you typically eat in your diet to give you an idea of the differences, but I do wonder if I can find what the amounts mean. Of course, just because a food has glutamate in it, it's the free form that bothers the msg sensitives, so it isn't necessarily an avoid right?

Here are the sources:

http://www.foodcomp.dk/fcdb_namesearch.asp

http://www.whfoods.com/foodstoc.php
Dianne
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 27, 2008 - 2:38 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Depending on how a food with a naturally high glutamate content is prepared. Like tomatoes for example. Eaten not overly ripe and raw may not be much of a problem unless you are hyper sensitive. I think it's an individual thing. I can get away with most naturally occurring glutamates as long as not cooked a lot.
Pitt326
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 5:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The listings here only represent the free glutamic acid that is "bounded" (not harmful) and not the "free kind" which is what is hurting us in high amounts.

Adam
Elaine B
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 12:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pitt326: I have tried e-mailing you with your website address for some info & the e-mail will not go thru. Could you verify your e-mail address? I am very interested in talking with you.
Melinda
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 8:28 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Adam....good to know. But am wondering if those who are hyper sensistive may still have problems with even the bound form of free glutamate. I thought free meant it wasn't bound and didn't realize there were two types of free glutamate -bound and unbound. Did you mean to say the lists are showing glutamate levels only and not the free glutamate levels?
Pitt326
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, April 05, 2009 - 6:41 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can reach me at adam.pitt@tossingmeds.com. Those who are hypersensitive will not have a problem with bounded glutamate unless its cooked in a way that sets that bounded glutamate free. Unfortunately, most stats on glutamate is of the bounded type and not the free.
Tom Fernstrom
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, April 05, 2009 - 6:46 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Adam,

The bound glutamate does bother some of the hypersensitives -- especially early on in the struggle to rid one's system of free glutamate. The first couple of years, I would have reactions from eating ripe tomatoes out of our garden. But after purging my system of free glutamate, I was slowly able to start eating tomatoes, mushrooms, etc. without reaction.

Perhaps it took me longer because at the time all of us on this discussion group were still trying to identify all the various "hidden" sources of MSG.
Pitt326
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 3:07 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All meats and chicken have thousands of miligrams of bound glutamate. Regular milk also has thousands of miligrams of bound glutamate. Bound glutamate is not and has never been the problem.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 14, 2009 - 8:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is an ongoing argument. We need more research to verify that bound glutamate will always be safe for every individual. I suspect that under conditions that existed before the the fifties, people could eat natural bound glutamate in foods without an issue. That is as it should be for the normal health individual. However, another theory is that if a person is constantly eating foods high in processed free glutamate, over the years, its effects are manifested more seriously as it reaches toxic and damaging levels in the body. When this person eats a lot of very ripe tomatoes, which can contain both free and bound glutamate..not processed free glutamate..just in a free form, due to the ripening process which breaks down the peptide linkages... then not only will the digestive system break down the bound glutamate, but the free glutamate will have a much easier time reaching the bloodstream. It seems that eating A LOT of ripe tomatoes every day...or cheese....could tip the scales and add to the glutamate overload the body already has a hard time dealing with. And genetics may come into play here....all theories in great need of testing! Consider PKU. Some of us may have a better ability to metabolize glutamate than others. But the abnormal amount in our processed foods puts us over the edge.

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