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Garnier Fructis Changes Ingredients

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Ideas, Suggestions, and Information » Garnier Fructis Changes Ingredients « Previous Next »

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Judith
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Posted on Monday, May 21, 2007 - 5:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unfortunately, it's the colored treated version that many of us use. I'm not sure when, I just happened to check and benzyl salicylate is now an ingredient. This brings me to a new product I just spotted. I bought the hairspray but haven't tried it yet. The company is called Cliniderm. They are Canadian so I don't know how widely spread it is being sold just yet. Their products are being advertised as "NO parabens, dyes, perfume, lanolin, formaldehyde or PROTEIN" the latter of which caught my eye. I didn't buy the shampoo because I already had my Garnier in the bag! I couldn't find the ingredients listed online anywhere, but the hairspray does have one ingredient I am wondering about: avena sativa (oat)kernal extract. What does everyone think, is it safe? As for the Garnier, I have been using it for a couple of weeks and haven't dropped dead yet, but any changes are a concern. Of the mild shampoos that many of you rotate, are any of them safe on color-treated hair?
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 3:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Judith,

The form of oats I usually see in shampoos is hydrolyzed oat protein.

http://www.fromnaturewithlove.com/soap/product.asp?product_id=oatprothydro

If in doubt that they are being accurate on their label, you can always contact them.

http://www.canderm.com/page.asp?intNodeID=8015
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, May 22, 2007 - 9:53 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I avoid oat protein, which is high in glutamate...along with soy, wheat, silk, and milk proteins one often sees on hair products labels. So far, I have done okay with Tresemme hairspray.
Judith
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Posted on Friday, May 25, 2007 - 7:20 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Roy and Deb. I will try the hairspray and see what happens, and perhaps try the shampoo down the line, as our choices get fewer and fewer.
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2007 - 11:57 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do like the Nature's Gate Shampoo for babies, but recently saw that they have a new bottle. Have not read the ingredients, but will.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2007 - 1:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nature's Gate Shampoo for babies has ingredients such as citric acid that some are sensitive to.

Water, Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Lauramide DEA, Urtica Dioica (Nettle) Extract, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Extract, Achillea Millefolium (Yarrow) Extract, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Prunus Serotina (Wild Cherry) Bark Extract, Thymus Vulgaris (Thyme) Extract, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Flower Extract, Prunus Persica (Peach) Leaf Extract, Polysorbate 20, Butylene Glycol, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Diazolidinyl Urea, Citric Acid, Sodium Chloride, Fragrance.

http://www.natures-gate.com/shop/showitem.asp?ProductId=41103282&menuId=171&withLinks=1
Deb A.
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Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 2:32 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So far, the only shampoo that I have found that does not contain citric acid is Dr. Bonner's or is it Dr. Bronner's castile soap. I found a recipe on the internet for shampoo which just involves pouring hot water over castile flakes. The recipe says that it will not be as sudsy since most shampoos contain chemicals that make commercial brands lather up a lot and also a chemical to break down the lather when rinsed. It suggested adding peppermint or lemon oil (essential oils) for scent, if desired. No, I don't know where one would find such flakes. I like the baby scented and peppermint shampoos by Dr. Bonner. Some may not like the way their hair feels after using that brand. It's been suggested that a little olive oil can be added to any shampoo, and that may leave the hair softer. Trader Joe's has their own brand of castile shampoo, too.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 4:25 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've tried Dr. Bronner's, and while it smells wonderful, I find it unacceptable how it leaves my hair. Between the two you're probably better off with Nature's Gate if you don't react to it.

http://www.drbronner.com/index.html

more about shampoo:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shampoo
Deb A.
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Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 12:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've noticed that Dr. Bronner's liquid soaps now contain citric acid....what doesn't? And with all the scare about tainted products from China, I wonder if we import a majority of the citric acid used in our foods and cosmetics and such from there. The article mentioned that most of the vitamin C we use is imported from China.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 2:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

China exports about 70% of their citric acid, and the USA is among the major buyers.

http://www.cnchemicals.com/maindocs/marketreports/maincontent/CitricAcid.htm
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Friday, June 01, 2007 - 2:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"In the last decade, China has become the world’s leading supplier of many food flavorings, vitamins and preservatives. Like fingernail clippers, playing cards, Christmas ornaments and other items, some food additives are available in large quantities only from China.

China exported $2.5 billion of food ingredients to the United States and the rest of the world in 2006, an increase of 150 percent from just two years earlier, according to Chinese industry estimates. It is now the predominant maker of vanilla flavoring, citric acid and varieties of Vitamin B such as thiamine, riboflavin and folic acid"


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1839954/posts
Deb A.
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Posted on Saturday, June 02, 2007 - 6:25 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Roy. Looks like we are luckier than a lot of the public since we have been avoiding a lot of possibly tainted items by avoiding processed foods.
MEMorrisNJ
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Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 4:18 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, we are indeed luckier thanks to all we have learned here due largely to your efforts, Deb.

I just read about Sodium Benzoate and citric acid which can be found in sodas --- it can create benzene when the two are mixed together. Imagine that --- Have you had your daily dose of benzene today? And I use to indulge in a little Canada Dry Ginger Ale every so often. That's off my list now!
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, June 05, 2007 - 10:09 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, MEMorrisNJ, but I know I have to give credit to a lot of other people who helped me over the years. And a big hats off to all the great friends here who loyally help newcomers and add so much to my life and knowledge right here.
As for sodas, I am enjoying our soda water maker from Soda Club. I think we paid around $100.00 for it over a year ago, and enjoy it often. It comes with the machine and several CO2 cartridges and 4 bottles. We tossed the flavor packets. :-( I buy fresh ginger, peel and cut it into chunks and puree with water (about 3 cups) in the blender. Then I strain it through a colander lined with a thin dish towel, over a bowl. I gather up the cloth once most of the liquid is strained, and squeeze out the rest of the moisture and flavor. It could just be strained through a fine mesh stainer, too. I use about a pound of ginger. Then add the ginger water to a pot with at least two cups of sugar (taste an add more if desired...it will be diluted with the soda water.....and some more water if too thick. Simmer to dissolve and pour into glass jars and freeze or refrigerate. I have sweetened it with a little maple syrup or brown sugar along with mostly cane sugar on occasion, and it makes for a more mellow flavor ginger ale. I add a little salt, too, and after it is off the heat, some pure vanilla extract. Just put a little in the bottom of a glass and fill with soda water. A squeeze of lemon or lime in it is great. I make chocolate syrup (in our book) and will make a drink of that, some milk, and soda and ice. Or we will just add a squeeze of lemon or orange or lime juice to the soda. I have heard that there are some very natural root beer syrups online, so will have to do some searching.

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