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Msg free island?

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Media Reports and Letters Related to the Issue » Msg free island? « Previous Next »

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janet
Posted on Tuesday, May 24, 2005 - 5:26 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

from http://www.lexpress.mu/display_article_sup.php?news_id=40659

MSG free island?

When it comes to MSG or Monosodium Glutamate, many Mauritians you speak to either aren’t aware of any controversy going on with regard to this additive or aren’t too concerned as to its reported side effects. Most of them use it daily in their cooking and even supermarkets sell it prominently beside regular salt. Is it only North Americans and Europeans then who are sensitive to this additive? Is it all in their heads?

It all started when glutamate was discovered as the fifth taste after salty, sweet, bitter and sour. It has a savoury “brothy” or meaty taste, which when added to food enhances its flavour. It is an amino-acid found in the human body and used for normal body functions and it is even found in breast milk.

In 1907 Professor Ikeda of the Tokyo Imperial University extracted glutamate from the kombu seaweed. His only problem was that, to get this savoury taste, he would have to use 100g of kombu to produce just 1 g of glutamate. Other issues such as storability and an easy-to-use form were resolved when the sodium salt of glutamic acid was extracted industrially by fermentation. This extract became known as MSG and the controversy started.

On the one hand, MSG producers argue that it is a natural substance and, if people are sensitive to it, they are only a very small percentage and chances are that they reacted to other ingredients in the food that they ate, not just to MSG. On the other, MSG, according to scientific studies, has been linked to face and neck numbness, headaches, fatigue, drowsiness, asthma-like symptoms, chest pain, nausea and constipation. Supposedly reactions can occur as soon as one hour after its consumption.

Interestingly though, when it comes to labelling, especially in the US, if a product contains less than 99% MSG, there is no need to label it as MSG. It can be called glutamic acid, modified enzyme, natural flavouring, yeast extract, maltodextrin or autolyzed yeast. Doing your own survey will reveal that these ingredients are commonly listed on products such as: yogurt, ice cream, spice mixes, soups, salad dressings and products containing fish or meat.

Whether or not Mauritius becomes an MSG free island will be up to its consumers and meanwhile as the controversy rages you’ll find most restaurants here more than happy to accomodate your specifications. So, to MSG or not is still up to you!


Angela KEESOONDOYAL
Carol H
Posted on Friday, May 27, 2005 - 12:21 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds just like the MSG industry "talking points" memo all the good little industry paid spokespeople spread everywhere they can....
Deb A.
Posted on Friday, May 27, 2005 - 10:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yup!
MEMorrisNJ
Posted on Saturday, May 28, 2005 - 1:54 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

See entry #9 at http://www.myanmar.gov.mm/NLM-2001/enlm/March12.htm --- they are focusing on MSG from Thailand in this article from several years ago:
The Government of the Union of Myanmar
The Ministry of Home Affairs
Order No 1/2001 The 2nd Waning of Taboung 1362 ME (10 March 2001)
Illegally-imported Thailand-made taste enhancer Monosodium Glutamate and soft drinks are banned
1. Thailand-made taste enhancer Monosodium Glutamate of all brands including ladle brand, pot brand, red leaf brand, palace brand, sunflower brand, sardan brand, and soft drinks of various kinds including red bull brand, Lippo brand and shark brand are being imported and sold illegally by some smugglers through Thailand/Myanmar border by land or sea.
2. It was already announced to the public that the consumption of the above-mentioned Thailand-made taste enhancer Monosodium Glutamate and soft drinks were banned because, according to the laboratory experiments of the Ministry of Health, they contain chemicals that are injurious to the health of human beings; users can develop disease in the long run; and their health can fail, which can at last result in loss of life.
3. With a view to safeguarding public health and life, therefore, it is announced to the public that the import, sale and consumption of Thailand-made taste enhancer Monosodium Glutamate of all brands including ladle brand, pot brand, red leaf brand, palace brand, sunflower brand, sardan brand, and all the illegally-imported soft drinks are banned again.
Anonymous
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 6:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kansst du mir ein Speisekarte zeigen ?wqw
MEMorrisNJ
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 20, 2007 - 6:00 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thailand: Pollution fears following mass fish kill
14 March, 2007 -
Central province
of Ayutthaya
HUNDREDS of thousands of farmed fish have been found dead in one of Thailand's key rivers, the fisheries department said yesterday, prompting fears that factories were polluting the waterway. According to News24.com, parts of the central provinces of Ang Thong and Ayutthaya along the Chao Phraya river were officially declared disaster zones Tuesday, after the fish started dying there on Sunday night. Officials said they were still trying to determine what had caused the deaths of up to one million caged tubtim fish, a type of tilapia, at different locations along the river about 100km north of Bangkok. Jaranthada Karnsasuta, director general of the fisheries department, is reported to have said that a sudden lack of oxygen in the water killed the fish. He said they were investigating two possible explanations - that a sugar boat which capsized earlier this month released toxic by-products into the river, or that upstream factories had polluted the waterway. Local villagers and farmers suspect that factories, including one that produces the food additive monosodium glutamate, had released untreated water into the Chao Phraya, which flows down to the capital Bangkok, said Jaranthada. The ministry of agriculture will compensate fish farmers for their losses, which total about 40 million baht, said Jaranthada.
www.fishfarmer-magazine.com is published by Special Publications. Special
Publications also publishes FISHupdate.com, FISHupdate magazine, Fish Farmer,
the Fish Industry Yearbook, the Scottish Seafood Processors Federation Diary,
the Fish Farmer Handbook and a range of wallplanners.
http://groups.google.com/group/soc.culture.malaysia/browse_thread/thread/51bb1ef150b28961/f0230438dc6ef350?lnk=gst&q=monosodium+glutamate&rnum=18&hl=en#f0230438dc6ef350
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 20, 2007 - 6:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Per the link below,

"Clearly untreated MSG wastewater is toxic to the fish".

http://www.paper.edu.cn/downloadpaper.php?serial_number=chengshupei-3&type=2

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