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Parkinsons and Restless Leg Syndrome

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Media Reports and Letters Related to the Issue » Parkinsons and Restless Leg Syndrome « Previous Next »

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Carol H
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2004 - 12:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

New story on Parkinson's drug helping those with restless legs syndrome. http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/sens/518535.html

Both these diseases may be related to glutamate.
Carol H
Posted on Tuesday, April 27, 2004 - 12:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually pergolide is a dopamine agonist also used as an anti-depressant. It acts like the medication I am on for a pituitary tumor. Remember, dopamine is reduced by glutamate. This suggests that glutamate may be involved with Parkinsons', and restless leg syndrome as well as pituitary tumors, and depression. Gee, where else have we heard that?
Deb A.
Posted on Sunday, May 02, 2004 - 1:26 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just as an aid for people trying to understand some of the scientific bio-lingo here, an agonist is " a drug capable of combining with receptors to initiate an action". In more detail, it is " an endogenous substance (originating in the body) or a drug that can interact with a receptor and initiate a physiological response characteristic of that receptor(contraction, relaxation, secretion, enzyme activation."...found on Google. As you can see, since glutamate is capable of interfering with the response of so many cells and systems, drug companies are responding to the need for more and more agonists to assist the systems that would normally support good health....if we weren't being bombarded with such excessive glutamate to our bodies, drug companies and doctors would have a lot less business.
Anonymous
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 5:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ich can mich an dich uberhaupt nicht errinern.mav
MEMorrisNJ
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 5:09 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Books with references to "excitatory limbs" http://www.amazon.com/phrase/excitatory-limbs/ref=sip_top_1/002-7591041-9824846
Tom Fernstrom
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 20, 2007 - 5:00 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Restless Leggers,

My wife had this problem to the point where it drove me nuts. Our local paper has a medical columnist name Dr. Peter Gott. He passed on a suggestion from a reader who claimed to have almost instant relief from RLS by placing a bar of deodorant soap between the bottom sheet and the mattress pad near the legs. I got my wife to try it and it worked like a champ within about two days. The soap cannot be Dove or Dial for some reason but must be deoderant. We use Coast brand. Reader response to this suggestion has been all positive. Just thought I'd pass it on.
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 20, 2007 - 6:23 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tom, that reminds me of the snoring cure where you sew a tennis ball into the back of a pajama top.
Dianne
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 22, 2007 - 12:34 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My husband had RLS for years and when I put us on an MSG-free diet last year due to my sensitivity his RLS quieted down and is almost non-existent now.
MEMorrisNJ
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, June 23, 2007 - 5:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.bestsyndication.com/?q=062207_gene_therapy_for_parkinsons_disease.htm
MANHASSET, N.Y., June 22 A new gene therapy technique tested on a dozen patients in the United States may keep symptoms of Parkinson's disease from getting worse.The study, published in the current issue of the journal Lancet, was led by Dr. Andrew Feigin, director of Neuroscience Experimental Therapeutics at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in collaboration with New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Center.
The gene therapy would be used to reduce symptoms and not alter the underlying disease process, the Feinstein Institute said Friday in a release.One woman and 11 men with advanced Parkinson's disease received a surgical infusion of fluid containing a viral vector and genes for a protein called glutamic acid decarboxylase that is critical in controlling a neurotransmitter called GABA that is reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease, the study said. Feigin said that patients had about a 27 percent improvement in symptoms. The scientists are designing a double-blind placebo controlled trial that would enroll far more patients in an attempt to see whether the gene therapy is effective in reducing symptoms
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, June 23, 2007 - 4:40 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Great news, MEMorrisNJ.

By the way, I advised a friend with Parkinson's to cut out his aspartame sweetened sodas. They also put him on medication. He's doing much better and I wonder how much of a factor the nutrasweet was.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 10:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The evidence is overwhelming....the glutamate connection we have been saying for years...Parkinson's, autism, Alzheimer's, RLS, and so on.
MEMorrisNJ
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 4:10 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I found the references about neurotransmitters at neurorelief.com very interesting (but I know nothing about their products)
From this reference at https://www.neurorelief.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=229&Itemid=48
it appears that some folks need to increase glutamate activity (as in Alzheimers) and some need to decrease glutamate activity (as in autism). Quote:
"Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain
Anxiety, insomnia, compulsive disorders, and panic disorders, are typically associated with increased glutamate
Alzheimer's, reduced memory, cognitive impairment, and reduced neural plasticity are typically associated with decreased glutamate
Epinephrine and norepinephrine are excitatory neurotransmitters which increase the likelihood of glutamate release and neuron depolarization
Supplementation with histidine containing therapies like ExcitaCor can increase epinephrine and norepinephrine and enhance glutamate activity
Supplementation with theanine or taurine containing therapies like TravaCor or GABAMax can decrease glutamate activity"

And it says at
https://www.neurorelief.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=232&Itemid=48 that high levels of excitatory neurotransmitters will cause rapid and repeated neuron firing and increase neurotoxin formation." --- they say this causes neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and autism.
Carol H
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, July 01, 2007 - 8:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think they are incorrect on the "glutamate activity" front. Memantine a glutamate blocker used to treat Alzheimer's. I think the only folks that suffer from a LACK of glutamate activity are children with Down's syndrome who have problems with too much GABA. Unfortunately, they had to stop giving them a medicine that caused seizures - which means they have to get the levels right.
It is true that normal glutamate in the brain is involved in memory but that only works if you've got neurons left that still work.

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