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Heinz response

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Media Reports and Letters Related to the Issue » Heinz response « Previous Next »

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Dutchbabiesx2
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Posted on Friday, September 28, 2012 - 8:22 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On behalf of my 9 yr old I wrote to a local burger chain here in Northern Colorado regarding the Ketchup choices. They currently have the regular HFCS Heinz but are considering Heinz Natural Ketchup.

Again- I wrote them about the ingredients (spices and natural flavorings) possibly being an MSG like additive.

Here is what Larkburger got from Heinz:
I reached out to corporate for an answer.

Our Senior Manager in Ketchup R&D provided a response:

The way ingredients are listed on the label is dictated by Federal regulation. As a major food manufacturer, Heinz is very strict in complying with those regulations and does not mask ingredients through them.
“Spice” are truly spices no different than those in a home spice cupboard. Regulations allow for the grouping of multiple spices as “spice” so that the reader is informed of them while the proprietary nature of them is retained.
“Natural Flavors” are indeed natural extracts of spices or herbs or other natural food ingredients much like almond or vanilla extracts are Natural Flavor versions of almond an vanilla. Like “spice”, Natural Flavors is a way of grouping them in a way to inform the reader while retaining their proprietary nature.
Heinz specifically calls out any allergens and does not use MSG in ketchup – we would label it if we did and if it were in an ingredient component – would not use it ketchup.
The fundamental Nature of Ketchup – regarding its components - is regulated by the FDA via a standard of identity which places restrictions on its composition. Heinz complies with this standard.”

this is all and good, and Larkburger I am sure is feeling better about their choice. But I'm not so easily convinced.

I was thinking of writing to Larkburger and giving a list of specific ingredients and asking them to follow up with Heinz and ask if these items are (in any amount) in the Ketchup- allowing for their retained proprietary rights.

Any suggestions?
Dutchbabiesx2
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Posted on Friday, September 28, 2012 - 8:25 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Correction- the Ketchup in question is called Simply Heinz not Natural.
LisaS
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Posted on Friday, September 28, 2012 - 10:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tend to be skeptical, but based on this letter and our personal experience, I don't think it's likely that the natural flavor in Heinz is deliberately hidden MSG. We aren't as sensitive as some, but we have never reacted to Heinz ketchup though we have reacted to "no-name" brands at restaurants.

My suspicion would be the hydrolysis of the tomatoes -- they cook those things to death to get the rich flavor. I'm pretty sure other brands don't cook them as much (you can tell they are closer to tomato sauce than Heinz is). Overcooked tomato paste is something I've heard of many people reacting to.
LisaS
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Posted on Friday, September 28, 2012 - 10:12 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One more thing -- distilled vinegar is very high in sulfites IIRC. That could be part of the reaction.
Di
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Posted on Saturday, September 29, 2012 - 2:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

LisaS, What is IIRC?
marie12
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Posted on Saturday, September 29, 2012 - 5:02 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not LisaS, but I thought I'd jump in to answer, IIRC = if I recall correctly. (I believe, I'm pretty sure.)

And I believe it's mostly the wine vinegars that are highest in sulfites. I've been using rice vinegar when I make my mayo and have done o.k. with that.
ali
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Posted on Sunday, September 30, 2012 - 10:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In europe there is no HFCS in heinz. Its just sugar. The same for soft drinks (sodas). They are still nasty sugar laden drinks for sure, and aspartame is in every single one from what i can gather, but no HFCS.
Back to Heinz. My husband and kids have never reacted to heinz organic ketchup or heinz regular ketchup. They do fine with heinz organic baked beans and regular too.But our ultra sensitive little one and I dont eat them so i cant say for sure we wouldnt react.But i dont do well with tomatoes.
Im thinking your "natural" beans are the regular european version????
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Monday, October 01, 2012 - 1:40 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is probably no high fructose corn syrup in Heinz and sodas in Europe because they have to label GMOs.

http://ec.europa.eu/food/food/biotechnology/gmfood/labelling_en.htm

The starch from GMO corn grown in Europe is used to make HFCS:

http://www.gmo-compass.org/eng/grocery_shopping/crops/18.genetically_modified_maize_eu.html

If the legislation to label GMOs in California passes in November, Heinz, soda makers and others will probably change their formulas here in the US to exclude HFCS so they won't lose sales when people see "GMO" on the label.
Di
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Posted on Monday, October 01, 2012 - 2:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Boy, we can only hope it passes - it would be a step in the right direction toward truth-in-labeling.
Deb A.
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Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - 9:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeast extract, citric acid, maltodextrin, dextrose, and other "natural" flavors are often part of a product's proprietary blend of spices and natural flavors. The word "spice" used as singular or "spices" plural can mean safe spices we find in a cupboard, but it can include dextrose in the blend or citric acid...or it can contain sulfites in an amount that does not have to be disclosed.
Di
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Posted on Thursday, October 04, 2012 - 3:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I found this from a link from the USDA website
[PDF] 10 PART 101—FOOD LABELING -
U.S. Government Printing OfficeFood Labeling Guidance & Regulatory Information Code of Federal Regulations, - Title 21, Food Labeling
Title 21 – parts 100 – 1692


(2) The term spice means any aromatic vegetable substance in the whole, broken, or ground form, except for those substances which have been traditionally regarded as foods, such as onions, garlic and celery; whose significant function in food is seasoning rather than nutritional; that is true toname; and from which no portion of any volatile oil or other flavoring principle has been removed. Spices include the spices listed in § 182.10 and part 184 of this chapter, such as the following:

Allspice, Anise, Basil, Bay leaves, Caraway seed, Cardamon, Celery seed, Chervil, Cinnamon, Cloves, Coriander, Cumin seed, Dill seed, Fennel seed, Fenugreek, Ginger, Horseradish, Mace, Marjoram, Mustard flour, Nutmeg, Oregano, Paprika, Parsley, Pepper, black; Pepper, white; Pepper, red; Rosemary, Saffron, Sage, Savory, Star aniseed, Tarragon, Thyme, Turmeric. Paprika, turmeric, and saffron or other spices which are also colors, shall be declared as ‘‘spice and coloring’’ unless declared by their common or usual name.

(3) The term natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis,
which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring
rather than nutritional. Natural flavors include the natural essence or extractives obtained from plants listed in §§ 182.10, 182.20, 182.40, and 182.50 and part 184 of this chapter, and the substances listed in § 172.510 of this chapter.

2) An incidental additive in a food, originating in a spice or flavor used in the manufacture of the food, need not be declared in the statement of ingredients if it meets the requirements of
§ 101.100(a)(3).

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2008-title21-vol2/pdf/CFR-2008-title21-vol2-part101.pdf
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, October 08, 2012 - 10:18 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I emailed Adrienne Samuels asking about "spice". She replied:
CPG Sec. 525.750 Spices - Definitions

BACKGROUND:


No definitions for standards of identity for spices have been established in accordance with Section 401 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Advisory standards were issued in 1918 as Food Inspection Decision (FID) 172, under the Food and Drugs Act of 1906. These defined the collective term "spices" and described a number of specific foods classified as spices. These underwent several revisions, the latest having appeared as Service and Regulatory Announcement (SRA) F.D. No. 2, Revision 5, November 1936. These advisory standards provided substantial guidance to the food industry concerning acceptable labeling of spices or flavorings, and foods in which these were used. At the same time they were useful as guides to regulatory officials, under both the 1906 Food and Drugs Act and 1938 Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.


These advisory standards were considered in connection with preparation of the list of "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) spices and other natural flavorings in 21 CFR 182, and the promulgation of regulations concerning food labeling in 21 CFR 101.22.

After consultation with the American Spice Trade Association, the list has been brought up-to-date, and information from other sources has been added.


POLICY:


In the absence of definitions and standards of identity for spices, the following descriptions provide guidance concerning acceptable names for use in labeling spices and foods in which they are used. Only the commonly used spices are included; specific questions about other substances which may be considered as spices within the general definition may be referred to the Food and Drug Administration.


DEFINITIONS:


1. SPICES - General Definition - Aromatic vegetable substances, in the whole, broken, or ground form, whose significant function in food is seasoning rather than nutrition. They are true to name and from them no portion of any volatile oil or other flavoring principle has been removed.

I would guess that Jack knew of people who had MSG reactions from something with "spices" in it. The word "spices." Individually named spices should not have monosodium glutamate or some other MSG-containing ingredient added to them. But as you well know, there is much cheating done in the flavoring industry, so a consumer is really never safe from the effects of cheating.

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