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MiR-155, SNX27

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Scientific Information » MiR-155, SNX27 « Previous Next »

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Pat
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Posted on Monday, May 27, 2013 - 7:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can we extrapolate anything from this info?
Do we have too much brain protein?
Are we lacking Inositol & Phospholipids?
Need someone to interpret, as this is above my comprehension.

In human Down syndrome brains, the increase in miR-155 levels correlates almost perfectly with the decrease in SNX27.

Due to the extra chromosome 21 copy, the brains of people with Down syndrome produce extra miR-155, which by indirect means decreases SNX27 levels, in turn decreasing surface glutamate receptors.

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20130325/Study-reveals-role-of-SNX27-protein-in-brain-function.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SNX27
http://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=SNX27

phosphoinositide
any of a group of inositol-containing derivatives of phosphatidic acid that do not contain nitrogen and are found in the brain

http://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/phosphoinositide

A phosphatidic acid combined with inositol found in biomembranes and a precursor to certain cellular signals. Sometimes referred to as inositide.

phosphoinositide --> phosphatidylinositol
(Science: biochemistry) A phosphatidic acid combined with inositol found in biomembranes and a precursor to certain cellular signals. Sometimes referred to as inositide.

It is a very important minor phospholipid in eukaryotes, involved in signal transduction processes. Contains myoinositol linked through the 1 hydroxyl group to phosphatidic acid.

The 4 phosphate (pIP) and 4, 5 bisphosphate derivatives pIP2) are formed and broken down in membranes by the action of specific kinases and phosphatases (futile cycles).

signal sensitive phospholipase C enzymes remove the inositol moiety, in particular from 1,4,5 trisphosphate (PIP2) as inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate (Ins P3: iP3). Both the diacyl glycerol and products act as second messengers.
Synonym: phosphoinositide.

http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Phosphoinositide

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12040186

http://wwwchem.csustan.edu/chem4400/SJBR/angel99.htm
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Monday, May 27, 2013 - 8:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Perhaps with Down Syndrome there are too few glutamate receptors and the ones that exist are overactive, suggested in the Memantine study.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/31/magazine/a-fathers-search-for-a-drug-for-down-syndrome.html?pagewanted=3
LisaS
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Posted on Tuesday, May 28, 2013 - 8:37 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

my son gets a lot of benefit from taking 420 mg of phosphatidylcholine, but found and also tall to be to "deactivating" (whatever the opposite of activating is he gets lethargic).
Pat
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 28, 2013 - 6:51 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Based on the adult min daily requirement below (somewhere it was written up to 3x/day), perhaps your Son's dose is too high or he may be allergic to it. I didn't see 'lethargic' as an adverse reaction to Choline. One article mentioned depression, however.

"It was determined in 1998 by the Institute of Medicine that although you can make choline, that you may not make enough for your body's needs. A minimum daily requirement for adults has been set at 425 mg per day for women and 550 mg for men."

http://www.livestrong.com/article/259379-what-are-the-benefits-of-the-vitamins-inositol-choline/#ixzz2UdyRnVyi

Think I'll start taking Non-GMO Lecithin & see it I can tell any difference.

Roy, we have adequate # of glutamate receptors that get overactivated, so thought that Choline might be a missing adjunct to saturate the receptors.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 1:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Carnitine and choline derivatives containing a trimethylamine group prevent ammonia toxicity in mice and glutamate toxicity in primary cultures of neurons."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8858993
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 6:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry, I was using Dragon voice recognition yesterday...that should have said, "my son gets a lot of benefit from taking 420 mg of phosphatidylcholine, but found INOSITOL to be too "deactivating".

Interesting, though. When I've increased the dosage (which are softgels so I only can double) he doesn't do well -- however, it's not lethargy, but over-excitation IIRC.

Sorry for the confusion!

Oh, he also reacted very badly to 250mg of Acetyl-L-Carnitine (I think it caused excess serotonin) but gets a lot of energy from a small dose, he is up to 1/2 that, 125mg, now.

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