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Sulfite content of foods

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LisaS
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Posted on Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 8:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, I finally found a reputable document that explains sulfites in foods!! It was buried in the link I posted above:

http://www.readingtarget.com/nosulfites

I'm reading the part about corn and it's fascinating. But also intimidating...Do I really have to go on another ingredient witch hunt like the glutamates? Egads.
Jennifer
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Posted on Friday, April 27, 2012 - 12:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That guy has the best site for sulfites.

Though I don't seem to have issues with sulfur-rich food, just sulfites. Garlic is high in both free glutamate and asparate, so I blame that on any reactions I get. I can have normal quantities used in cooking. And entire roasted bulb on bread however...ugh. I did that once, and never will again.

I tell people I'm allergic to corn, soy and sulfites. That pretty much rules out anything processed.

Jennifer
LisaS
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Posted on Saturday, April 28, 2012 - 1:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's good to know that a little in cooking is OK. What about onions, eggs, and broccoli?

I think, other than the ones in my "safe" bread (some potato flour), the processed ones will be reasonable for me to cut out. But to cut out eggs, garlic and onion in cooking, that's harder.
EmilyS
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Posted on Saturday, April 28, 2012 - 5:17 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We are egg free due to my daughters reactions to eggs. If you are ever wanting to cut out eggs from your baking, ground chia seeds make an awesome egg replacement. 1 TBSP ground chia seeds with 3 TBSP water = 1 large egg
Di
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Posted on Sunday, April 29, 2012 - 5:04 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Where do you find ground chia seeds, I never heard of them?
Jennifer
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Posted on Sunday, April 29, 2012 - 6:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Now I can't get the Chia Pet song out of my head...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzY7qQFij_M

Probably not the easiest way to get chia seeds.

Sorry for the early morning humor.

Lisa, I think my response in your other thread is appropriate here too.

Jennifer
Nana
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Posted on Sunday, April 29, 2012 - 12:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't understand about sulfites and sulfates. I can't eat raw onions, but can eat them if they are cooked very, very well until they are "clear enough to see through them" and I can eat dehydrated onions used in cooking. Dried fruit with sulfites are not good for me. Also, I seem to thrive on soaking baths with Epsom Salt (magnesium sulfate).
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, April 30, 2012 - 10:39 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I read that you can use ground flax seed with some water the same way as chia seeds as an egg substitute in baking.
LisaS
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Posted on Thursday, May 03, 2012 - 8:05 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nana, I read on this site: http://www.learningtarget.com/nosulfites/ that sulfites and sulfates are different reactions. The author reacts only to the former, and my guess would be that you also react only to one form. He says something about exposing sulfites to oxygen while cooking (his example was in the eggs, and somewhere else too?)would convert them to sulfates and make them tolerable to him. So perhaps that's the answer. I wish I could get my 15 yo to take an epsom salt bath, we could at least test whether he reacts to sulfates. I wonder if there is any other good test? He seems to do OK with cooked eggs, so I'm reluctant to take them out without knowing if they really are an issue.
LisaS
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Posted on Thursday, May 03, 2012 - 8:08 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jennifer, that video is too cute...I had forgotten about those. I could get one as a pet for my guinea pig!! (Apparently I'm not the only one with this idea: http://www.guineapigcages.com/forum/diet-nutrition/59249-chia-pet-grass.html)

I'm up to my ears installing a big garden so maybe not, but it's a fun idea :-)

Lisa
Nana
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Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2012 - 3:34 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Lisa. There is so much to learn!
ali
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Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2012 - 8:06 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is interesting. Ive held off trying epsom salts for my little one after a "hit". I feel more confident to try it now.
I have found that upping her antitoxident levels was a great help with a dose of medicine i had to give her last week. She got thread worms and reacted so badly to the first dose i feared to give her the second. I gave her ibuprofen and fed her fruit all day long (she just loves blueberries!!:-)) and gave her lemon juice in water to drink. Gave her the second dose and yes i could still tell that she had ingested the medicine but on a much lesser scale than the previous dose. She was a little argumentative and was up with the larks but otherwise she is well.
Di
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Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2012 - 12:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My daughter is substitute teaching and just told me how argumentative and unruly most of her elementary students are. I wonder what they have been eating, hmmmm.
Deb A.
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Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2012 - 10:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have heard from scores of teachers saying the same thing...and many have noticed students are worse after lunch time.
LisaS
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Posted on Sunday, May 06, 2012 - 5:07 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think eating school lunches was one of the worst contributors to my son's health. His main issues are all things that make school hard -- irritability, brain fog, depression, etc. School lunches really are awful. It's so sad!
ali
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Posted on Monday, May 07, 2012 - 5:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We dont have school lunches here in Ireland, but do in the UK were im originally from. Im thankful to this day that my parents sent me with a packed lunch instead. Are you allowed to send in packed lunches in the states?
LisaS
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Posted on Wednesday, May 09, 2012 - 5:16 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh, definitely. But they aren't as "cool" as the school lunches, and my son prefers hot food and there isn't always a microwave. Mainly, he was so anxious to fit into a new school that he resisted taking a lunch, and of course we didn't know that glutamate was the problem then so it was a "pick your battles" thing, or so we thought.
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, May 09, 2012 - 9:42 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I get the "pick your battles". Sometimes we have to pick the best from bad options. :/
My biggest problem right now is getting my six year old not to swap food from her lunch for more tantalising food in someone elses lunch box. Today she came home in a teary argumentative mood. Turns out she swapped her home made bun for a chocolate muffin!!! Aaaaarrrgggh. She even knows the outcome. When i asked if she had eaten something other than her own food, she then tells me that she is in a bad mood because of the muffin.
Deb A.
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Posted on Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 10:22 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Your daughter will have choices all her life to make, but thanks to you, Ali, she will be so much farther ahead of others her age as she keeps learning from you. Rebellion is natural from time to time, especially when they become teens, but they will not forget what you have taught them when it becomes more and more crucial to their health. I salute all your moms today who are up against so much peer pressure and advertising, telling our kids to eat this or that pseudo food. If you continue to offer wholesome foods at home, your children will come to respect you and understand why eventually. I was just reading in Women's World magazine about a woman who lost over 100 pounds. She had tried every pill and diet and weighed 300 lbs. She remembered her grandmother's home cooking and decided to start cooking from scratch and avoiding all fast food restaurants, where she had eaten most days. She looks amazing. But there is the answer for everyone. There's no shame in saying "I cook from scratch for my family". We should all be proud of the extra time and commitment it takes to care what we and our loved ones eat. Hugs all around to all of you...you are doing wonderful things!
ali
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Posted on Sunday, May 13, 2012 - 10:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the words of encouragement Deb. It can sometimes seem an uphill struggle. Id be lost without the backup from this site.
We have just had a success with our six year old. She went to a party on Saturday and ate only bread and cheese. I make sure she is well fed before taking her. I work on the theory that if her tummy is full she wont go looking at the party food. But bless her, she did look and only took what she thought was safe for her. She even brought home a full party bag for me to go through and see what she could have in there. As usual it was zero. I keep a good selection of safe treats at home and we do swaps to refil the bags.
Im currently trying to make sweets at home. Peppermint creams are proving a hit with my youngest and fudge with the other two.
Deb A.
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Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2012 - 10:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Your little girl sounds adorable...and smart!
ali
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Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2012 - 10:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks...she is, but i am somewhat biased! :-)
bo'nana
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Posted on Saturday, May 19, 2012 - 9:41 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hey guys...
for those of us with Sulfa- sensitivities, it might be a good time to learn more about air quality...

from a recent Wikipedia entry on the subject (bold emphasis mine):

"Aerosol formation
Primary aerosol formation, also known as homogeneous aerosol formation results when gaseous SO2 combines with water to form aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4). This acidic liquid solution is in the form of a vapor and condenses onto particles of solid matter, either meteoritic in origin or from dust carried from the surface to the stratosphere. Secondary or heterogeneous aerosol formation occurs when H2SO4 vapor condenses onto existing aerosol particles. Existing aerosol particles or droplets also run into each other, creating larger particles or droplets in a process known as coagulation. Warmer atmospheric temperatures also lead to larger particles. These larger particles would be less effective at scattering sunlight because the peak light scattering is achieved by particles with a diameter of 0.3 μm.[8]...
The ability of stratospheric sulfate aerosols to create a global dimming effect has made them a possible candidate for use in geoengineering projects[1] to limit the effect and impact of climate change due to rising levels of greenhouse gases.[2] Delivery of precursor sulfide gases such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or sulfur dioxide (SO2) by artillery, aircraft[3] and balloons has been proposed....


Possible side effects
Geoengineering in general is a controversial technique, and carries problems and risks, such as weaponisation.[citation needed] However, certain problems are specific to, or more pronounced with this particular technique.[22]
>Drought, particularly monsoon failure in Asia and Africa is a major risk.[23]
>Ozone depletion is a potential side effect of sulfur aerosols;[24][25] and these concerns have been supported by modelling.[26]
>Tarnishing of the sky: Aerosols will noticeably affect the appearance of the sky, resulting in a potential "whitening" effect, and altered sunsets.</b>[27]
>Tropopause warming and the humidification of the stratosphere.[25]
>Effect on clouds: Cloud formation may be affected, notably cirrus clouds and polar stratospheric clouds.
>Effect on ecosystems: The diffusion of sunlight may affect plant growth.[28][29][30]but more importantly increase the rate of ocean acidification by the deposition of hydrogen ions from the acidic rain[31]
>Effect on solar energy: Incident sunlight will be lower,[32] which may affect solar power systems both directly and disproportionately, especially in the case that such systems rely on direct radiation.[33]
>Deposition effects: Although predicted to be insignificant,[34] there is nevertheless a risk of direct environmental damage from falling particles.
>Uneven effects: Aerosols are reflective, making them more effective during the day. Greenhouse gases block outbound radiation at all times of day.[35]
>Further, the delivery methods may cause significant problems, notably climate change[36] and possible ozone depletion[37]..."


(please note they only say "has been proposed" but planned aerosolization has been quietly occurring and steadily increasing since the mid 1980's across much of the US. Currently aerosol flights are also performed in many countries around the world)

...in addition to the above mentioned "potential" side effects... what about allergic reactions to the sulfides once they trickle down to ground level?

ive been sadly watching progressive planned aerosolization ruining our NW skies for the past 6 years. Before that, i watched it happen in SoCal. For the past 2 weeks i have witnessed a sudden and remarkable increase in the allready heavy spray patterns overhead, one can only speculate as to reasons for the recent increase but it seems like an awful lot of folks in this area dont appear to feel very well, especially lately.

in our family, we've all been suffering with strangely behaving "allergies", "upper respiratory infections" etc for months, which have only gotten worse in the past couple weeks. our usual remedies havent helped and even the cat acts ill a lot of the time lately. our symptoms include vague chest pain, transient gut spasm/pains, on&off diarrhea without typical bacterial symptoms, recurring headaches especially with eye pain, sinus irritation & congestion, hoarseness, dry coughs, noisy plumbing, skin dry and drawn and ashy. extra fatigue, breathlessness, wheezing etc etc and it all just lingers, comes & goes, then back again in various combinations;;; Not like ordinary colds, flus or allergies at all. My body keeps screaming POISON at me and im not sure why i shouldnt listen since it usually knows itself so well... i see others who obviously LOOK like they feel the same way

and ive been wondering why, some of us are just really feeling Yucky... when there are still so many folks bopping around full of energy & without a care. but becoz i grew up in a very smoggy environment, my body still recognizes the effects of air pollution poisoning and not everyone seems to be impacted equally.

im thinking that Sulfide sensitivity reactions could likely account for quite a bit of my family's symptoms, as most of us are sulfa sensitive to one degree or another... while it makes sense folks without specific sulfa sensitivities wouldnt necessarily react acutely right off

i dont want to derail the foodchem-related purpose of this board with my concerns about air quality, not sure there's much any of us can actually DO about it anyway, short of somehow getting out from under the overhead flight paths- but if any of you are the sort (like me) who just "need to see the needle coming", maybe at least knowing about it will help.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stratospheric_sulfate_aerosols_(geoengineering)

obtw... please pay special attention to the list of "proposed" side effects. like i said, my family lives in a very heavy spray zone- and we experience pretty much everything wikipedia listed on a regular basis. and rates of diseases such as asthma and COPD are known to be rising in this region.... regardless whether any formal links are drawn or not

i would love to hear some thoughts from others, if any of this post resonates in some way with any of you out there....
bo'nana
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Posted on Saturday, May 19, 2012 - 11:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

btw, i also just found this article explaining the phenomenon my husband snapped a pic of just yesterday or the day befoe:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop%27s_Ring
i think it illustrates pretty well how much aerosol spraying has been going on overhead here, to have produced a ring around the sun normally seen following a volcanic eruption :-(
thats A LOT of sulphide compounds!

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