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Dimebolin (Dimebon) against Alzheimer...

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Scientific Information » Dimebolin (Dimebon) against Alzheimer’s « Previous Next »

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Zoomer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, November 02, 2008 - 6:37 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dimebon is an old antihistamine (hay fewer drug) from Russia, which shows promising results in treating Alzheimer’s. As Alzheimer’s is related to MSG toxicity there might be something for us too.

They talk about it blocking the glutamate receptors; I have no idea if this could help MSG sensitive people.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-wellbeing/features/have-scientists-discovered-a-cure-for-alzheimers-873649.html

http://hopes.stanford.edu/treatmts/antiglut/l7.html
Becky
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, November 02, 2008 - 10:04 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting! I did not know that MSG toxicity was related to Alzheimers. Anyone have any more information on this?

Actually, now that I think about it, MSG does cause lesions in the brain. Is that why it's related to Alzheimers?
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 75.24.211.188
Posted on Monday, November 03, 2008 - 4:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dr. Russel Blaylock's book, "Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills" has an entire chapter on it. I don't remember the details, but acute glutamate poisoning kills brain cells in a pattern similar to Alzheimer's. Or something like that.

Jennifer
Dianne
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Posted on Tuesday, November 04, 2008 - 6:28 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't remember what Blaylock's book said, but I've read somewhere Alzheimer's isn't just loss of brain cells - - research indicates that the disease is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. I wonder if glutamate produces the plaques and tangles or just contributes to it. Anybody know?
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 209.204.178.27
Posted on Wednesday, November 05, 2008 - 12:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That was covered in his book. I think the gist of it was that when rats had brain-cell die off due to glutamate, there were no plaques. Except they were euthanized right away. Animals that got to live the rest of their lives had the plaques and tangles.

Jennifer

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