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Migraines and neuro-excitation

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Scientific Information » Migraines and neuro-excitation « Previous Next »

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prg
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Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2008 - 10:07 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A recent article in SciAm describes the new discovery that migraines are not caused by swollen blood vessels but by electrical storms in the brain--in other words, over-excitation:
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=why-migraines-strike

and more from that Brazilian group working on glutamates and migraines. This article is about triptan overuse and glutamates and migraines but you will see that they are postulating both that triptans may work by reducing glutamate levels and that glutamate is involved in the causation of migraine:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17578532
Jennifer
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Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 3:25 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119355570/abstract

While correlation is not causation, this one shows plenty of correlation between glutamate and migraines, especially with aura.

Occasionally, I'll have the aura, but not too much head pain. I guess that's lucky.

Jennifer
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 5:21 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have the auras occasionally, too, Laura, but not the times that I have headaches. Not a good thing to have while driving as they obscure vision.

http://images.emedicinehealth.com/images/4453/4453-4464-9385-39749.jpg
Jennifer
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Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 9:43 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, it's kind of like that, but mine's more grey/blue/green colors. And filled completely in. The colors pulsate.

When you look at a bright spot, then look away, you can sort of see the afterimage move with your eyes. For the aura, it doesn't move no matter what gyrations I put my eyes through, and is clearly neurological.

I've read that migraines are a slow-moving "wave" of stimulation going across the cortex, and has been hypothesized that as the aura grows and shrinks, it's actually in tune with the areas of the "brain wave" of stimulation.

Mine always start out with a barely perceptible spot, like I looked into a bright light. It takes about 5 minutes before I'm sure it's a migraine. It can take away about 25% of my vision. Luckily I've never been driving, but I do have about 10 minutes to get to a safe place.

Last time I had one, I ended up eating an entire package of bacon, half a box of Ak-mak crackers, three oranges, a banana and anything else I could find. The hunger was insatiable, but fortunately I didn't have an MSG reaction. Go figure.

Jennifer
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 1:41 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jennifer, mine pulsate, also, and start out completely filled in, but then expand outward, leaving a gap in the center that I can see through, like in the link below. They look the same whether my eyes are open or closed. I had one while driving, but by keeping a safe driving distance and with the 17" convex mirror I had installed on my car to see around me, I got through it without incident. No hunger, though.

Aura simulation:
http://www.knownjohnson.com/?p=73
(scroll down to the picture and click "start")

My car mirror:
http://www.jcwhitney.com/WRAPAROUND-PANORAMIC-WIDE-ANGLE-MIRRORS/GP_2008409_N_111+10201+600015497_10101.jcw
Jennifer
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Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 9:39 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's a great link. It even gave me a bit of the kind of nausea I have with a real one. I blame it on "motion sickness" - my ears and eyes are definitely NOT in agreement when that happens.

Mine are pretty much limited to the left half of my field of view - not always though. I never get a ring I can see through.

The good news, is if I avoid chocolate, tea and caffeine, I won't get them. Easy enough fix.

I do wonder what the cause is for increased excitotoxic amino acids. I was reading that glycine is inhibitory in certain receptors, especially in the spinal cord, but acts to amplify glutamate on the NMDA receptors.

Jennifer
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 9:50 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would get the strangest vision reaction before I knew about MSG. I would see stacked boxes of what I was looking at, so everything was distorted...very frightening.
Tom Fernstrom
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Posted on Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 8:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Roy,

The animation reminds me of an old health film I saw once trying to explain the onset of blindness due to Glaucoma. My mother went blind from glaucoma and I have elevated pressures that I need to monitor. They have stabilized pretty well since I have avoided MSG.

Since Glaucoma affects the peripheral vision first it reminds me of the “aura” look in the animation. There’s a site that shows the degenerative sight caused by Glaucoma at: http://www.ahaf.org/glaucoma/about/understanding/progression-of-glaucoma.html
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 2:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tom,

There are some good glaucoma treatment options listed on that site.

The auras are temporary and are superimposed over normal vision. They start in the center and expand outwards. You can't see through them. They apparently don't originate in the eye structure itself, like glaucoma does, and you see them the same whether the eyes are open or shut.

My main concern is the risk of retinal detachment, as my high nearsightedness is accompanied by stretching and lattice degeneration. My eye pressure is actually low.
Jennifer
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Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 10:12 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Roy,

Thanks for that last post. I'll have to research the risk of retinal detachment, but had no idea that was a risk with nearsightedness. I had LASIK in 2000, and don't need corrective lenses anymore. It was actually good, I believe, because I would get lazy and sleep with the disposable lenses. Finding my contacts on the counter was a challenge. I couldn't tolerate glasses too well because of the 'fishbowl' distortion.

It's really easy to forget that I am terribly nearsighted, it was just corrected with surgery that doesn't really affect the whole structure of the eye.

I've never had the doctor comment one way or the other about my eye pressure.

Jennifer
lauragail4350
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Posted on Tuesday, October 19, 2010 - 3:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

sorry if this is posted elsewhere, wasnt sure where to post...has anyone seen the articles on the research study of 50,000 people that links glutamate buildup to migraines??!?! http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/nm/us_migraine_gene
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2010 - 12:09 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

HI Laura, i had heard about the study and read a little about it, but to be honest i was a bit blinded by the medical jargon on other reports, though others have told me there was a glutamate link. And lets face it, anyone that has suffered migrains and now controls them with diet knows first hand that glutamate causes or at least contributes to their migrains. Thanks for posting the article. Its a very clear and concise in laymans terms. Thanks Ali
DebA.
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Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 11:50 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Laura. I hope scientists really do the studies needed. I suffered terrible headaches for many years, as do millions now. The drugs so far have been somewhat helpful, but the side effects, scary.
Jerry Story
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Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 1:40 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Drugs stop symptoms by masking them. It stops the headache but the problem remains and you don't feel it. Side effects are poisonous effects. Target effects are poisonous effects. If instead of a drug it was a mushroom or anything not prescribed by a Medical Deity, most people would have no difficulty recognizing it as a poison. But the Medical Deity calls the poisonous effects 'side effects' and most people fall for that.

Look for causes. Doctors admit they are not good at causes. They usually don't even try to find causes. This means their doctoring is not based on science. There is a word for doctors like that: 'quack'. What is a quack? A quack is a doctor whose doctoring is not based on science. That definition qualifies all cut, poison, burn doctors as quacks.
DebA.
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Posted on Wednesday, October 27, 2010 - 10:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't take any drugs for headaches, except the occasional Advil. What you say is so true, Jerry. I know so many people who take very strong headache prescription drugs. They don't want to avoid MSG.

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