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Ketamine helps depression

Battling the MSG Myth » Sharing Scientific Information » Ketamine helps depression « Previous Next »

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Anonymous
 
Posted From: 209.204.178.27
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 11:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080506112416.htm

It's in Dr. Blaylock's book, Ketamine is a very powerful glutamate blocker. It helps depression by shutting down the pre-frontal cortex, in this study. I think maybe it's just helping calm over-stimulated neurons. I know depression is one of my glutamate symptoms.

Jennifer
Zoomer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 10:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is another study of Ketamine for depression:

http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/63/8/856
Zommer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 10:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

More links:

http://www.technologyreview.com/Biotech/19156/?a=f

http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn9696
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 209.204.178.27
Posted on Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:49 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081023100543.htm

Genomic Changes Found In Brains Of People Who Commit Suicide

This is a study of "epigenetics" (the study of how the environment alters gene expression) affecting depressed people. The relevant excerpt:
"The rate of methylation in the suicide brains was found to be nearly ten times that of the control group, and the gene being shut down was a neurotransmitter receptor that plays a major role in regulating behavior."

This kind of makes you wonder. Oh, but check out the reference:
Journal reference:

1. Poulter et al. GABAA Receptor Promoter Hypermethylation in Suicide Brain: Implications for the Involvement of Epigenetic Processes. Biological Psychiatry, 2008; 64 (8): 645 DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2008.05.028

Interesting.

Jennifer

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