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Gelatin capsules

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I've Just Made the MSG Connection" » Gelatin capsules « Previous Next »

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Anonymous
 
Posted From: 82.5.229.69
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2010 - 4:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is quite shocking to learn about the dangers of msg, especially considering all the foods that it is in. I am very surprised however to learn that msg is in our vitamin supplements as surely you would expect a product that is intended to assist health would not contain ingredients detremental to it.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Monday, August 09, 2010 - 2:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anonymous,

I, for one, have very bad reactions to some vitamins pills that I attribute to ingredients other than the individual vitamins themselves.

http://www.highonhealth.org/beware-of-hidden-ingredients-in-supplements-and-vitamins/

What's worse is that they even use neurotoxins in vitamins meant for children. That's a bitter pill to swallow:

"Why do Flintstones multivitamins contain aspartame (artificial sweetener)?

The Flintstones Complete formula and Plus Calcium formula contain aspartame. The aspartame masks the bitter taste of calcium found in both of these formulas."

source:

http://flintstonesvitamins.com/faqs/
kristy
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Posted on Monday, August 09, 2010 - 5:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually gelatin capsules can contain cornstarch as well. When faced with the choice of gelatin or vegetable capsules, neither is a good choice. The veg. capsules may contain corn (methylcellulose) and both types may use cornstarch for ease of manufacturing. The bottom line is that capsules are like Russian roulette - I have yet to find a company that could tell me if their capsules were manufactured using cornstarch.

Also, vitamins are a particular problem because many are fermented on a GMO corn derived medium. The way it was described to me is that many things are not considered an ingredient but merely part of the manufacturing or packaging process, therefore it is not legally necessary for it to be listed on the label. The same thing applies to the BHT in cereal packages (read about the recent recall), citric acid in canola and other cooking oils, cornstarch on deli meat packages, citric acid saturated soaker pad under raw meat, corn glue on the first and last paper towel, and the BPA in the epoxy lining of cans.
Di
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Posted on Monday, August 09, 2010 - 8:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wonder what kind of calcium Flintstones are using - the calcium I use has no taste, nor did the calcium I chewed as a child. On the Flintstones faqs I see that there are artificial dyes too.
ali
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Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 12:24 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Over the last few weeks it has been reported quite widely here in Europe that calcium supplements can increase the risk of heart attack.
Ive deleted the original report from my pc, but after having a quick google, i came up with this report that seems to cover the same info.
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100729191154.htm
bo'nana
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Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 7:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hmmm.... what do you want to bet that is becoz magnesium is essential to heart/electrical regulation, and too much calcium throws the vital cal/mag balance way off- leaving people who take gobs of calcium with a functional magnesium deficiency???
ali
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Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 7:43 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

that would make sense Bo'nana. I just heard so many reports the last couple of weeks. My mum takes loads of calcium which is what made me pay attention to it. Ill have to do some research because she is in a tizz worrying about it. How are you doing with the olive oil soap?
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 82.5.229.69
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 12:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is quite shocking to learn about the dangers of msg, especially considering all the foods that it is in. I am very surprised however to learn that msg is in our vitamin supplements as surely you would expect a product that is intended to assist health would not contain ingredients detremental to it.
Di
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Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 4:38 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's usually all about profits, making a product as inexpensively as possible doesn't mean making it good - just good enough to get by. There are only a few reputable companies, then just when you think you don't have to check their label anymore, they go and change some ingredient. It is so frustrating....a never ending battle.
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2010 - 1:53 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thats so true Di and it goes for everything not just vitamins. There was one brand of potato smily faces i could buy. I didnt use them often, but on a full busy day they had their place on occasion!! The last time i gave them to the kids, Isla went bright red within minutes of eating them, didnt sleep properly for days and was totally hyper. Nightmare. Couldnt figure out what the problem was. Then when i looked at the packet it had a "new improved recipe"!!! Grrrr. So the one quick thing i had for the kids is now off the menu. That said, we have had fun trying to recreate homemade smily potato faces without much sucess!!!
bo'nana
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Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2010 - 8:28 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"new improved recipes'... yeh. heh heh. aint it just luvly? after all these years of label reading, you would think i would learn to remain consistent.... but i seem to keep getting regularly blindsided by some new change too. sure wish they could all just leave well enough alone.
Sorry about what happened with your little one, ali... is she beyond the reaction now? i know about those darn freezer potatos too... my guys love Tater Tots and those hashbrown patties which are basically the same thing, pressed flat.... they sure are yummy. unfortunately, i think its got to be the nasties they use to get that perfect creamy flavor & texture.... i havent been able to duplicate anything even close either *sigh*

...oh btw, to answer your question, ali- i havent started the olive oil soap yet becoz i am still using that homemade bar of milk tallow soap, which i like, it makes my skin feel soft... but i will definitely let you know when i start the other! i expect i will like it, i am using an olive oil paste formulated with calendula & other herbs (by Wild Carrot) as a finish & it feels great.
also, i recently discovered that Burts Bees shampoos & conditioners have no sulfates and decided to give them a go... i dont think all the ingredients are necessarily 'safe' but i am suspecting that sulfa derivatives were the main thing making my hair fall out so... i've been using the new 'poo for about 2 weeks and so far so good. it took all the nasty crispy soap residue out that Dr Bronners had left behind, what a relief! and ive noticed that my face is not looking red anymore since switching hair care, so maybe its coconut after all... altho, im not totally sure that none of Burts ingredients are coco based...
i dont know, its all still a mystery to me. am still having the red blisters, altho not so many- mostly centered around my chin & nose now... my mom gave me a tube of Bacitracin Zinc to try, since i read that is so far still very effective for most varieties of Staph/Strep. ive been applying it only 3 days, but so far feel ambivalent as to results- the Bacitracin appears helpful, but wouldnt you know, i think i am starting a reaction to the carrier Petroleum jelly.
Dont suppose anyone knows of a Bacitracin ointment that is based in olive oil? ha ha

sorry everyone... i know this post was pretty off topic... what were we all talking about again?
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2010 - 11:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

bo'nana, I get a rash from bacitractin. We always had it in the house since we were allergic to mycin drugs (neosporin). I recently got blisters between my fingers from putting it on the cat's chin three nights in a row. I washed my hands with soap and water right after, too. Isn't it strange that I would never have dreamed of putting it on one of us, but it didn't occur to me not to use my bare hand to apply it to the cat?

Check out Mountain Rose Herbs, they have quite a few balms listed: (http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/search/search.php?refine=y&keywords=balm&x=0&y=0) I really love all their stuff. I recently bought some of their loose teas with wonderful results, too. My daughter has urgency as one of her symptoms of corn exposure and we used Easy Day tea with horsetail and comfrey root powders added to it. It stopped that miserable urgency in its tracks! (I looked up herbs that have been used to treat urgency online)

For the potatoes, try using mashed potatoes thickened with arrowroot powder and/or flour and push them through a cookie press for pretty shapes. For the tater tots, I made them using shredded and squeezed out potatoes (I salted them and then put them in a flour sack towel and squeezed the water from them) with a little egg and seasoned mashed potato added. The mashed potato makes a difference in the texture and the seasoning being mixed with the mashed works really well.

Here are some links to safe shampoos: http://gfsoap.com/ (confirmed to be corn and gluten-free)
http://www.100percentpure.com/HONEY-COCONUT-MILK-SHAMPOO-s/406.htm (citric acid confirmed to be from oranges)
http://www.shikai.com/ (many corn allergic buy this one from Whole Foods).

Personally, I use pure olive oil soap for washing my hair and organic apple cider vinegar for a conditioner if needed. I just don't trust anything with more than three ingredients anymore.
ali
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Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 6:43 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bo'nana, its so frustrating when the ingredients change. As such i use few pre prepared foods. Bread and the smiles potatoes were probably the two i use regulary. (still havent got to grips with bread making!! I really should!!) I to have tried many different methods of getting something resembling potato smiles, often with hillarious results. The funniest being when i actually went to the trouble of putting faces on them, only to find they spread in the oven and came out faceless (not to mention the fact that they were pretty grim to eat!!!)

Thanks for the tip on the cookie cutter Kirsty. Ill have yet another go with arrowroot powder.Ill let you know if ive any success!!

Ali
bo'nana
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Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2010 - 10:24 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

he he... gives a whole other meaning to the term 'potato smiles' doesnt it? :-)
thanx for the tips kristy... im also going to try with the arrowroot thickener, which i hadnt thought of altho i use it all the time in stovetop cooking. and adding mashed potatos sounds like just the thing for that creamy consistency!
can these be made ahead for the freezer?

i will keep Mountain Rose Herbs in mind, always good to have a back up in case Wild Carrot changes their recipes (perish the thought!) ...i can no longer use Shikai, unfortunately... and i LOVE their products too... still not sure whether its absolutely the coconut base i am reacting to, but i know i didnt use to have any problems with their lotions or hair care. but since my skin problems have increased over the past couple years, i do react to many products that were once no problem. i am certain now that sulfas/-ates/-onates are one of the things causing my hair to fall out, and Shikai does use Olefin Sulfonate in their colour care shampoo. i gave that another try after i dyed my hair red, but sure enough by the 2nd use, my hair was coming out in gobs again. and for 2 weeks after. ugh.
how do you use the olive oil soap and vinegar rinse? i havent yet been brave enough to try bar soap as a hair wash, and must not be doing the vinegar right as the smell stays... and stays... plus for some reason vinegar seems to make my hair strands kind of stretchy and wierd. maybe becoz it is color treated, i dont know?

interesting about the Mycin thing, both my son & i react terribly to Neosporin- it literally makes the scabs dissolve into runny yello goo, and prevents new skin from healing over. (i know, TMI... it is pretty disgusting) Must be more common than people realize, becoz my son's best buddy has discovered the same thing happens to him too. my husband has no problems tho, he swears by Neosporin for every little knick and ding- weve had more fights about it over the years, but i think he finally believes me now that he's seen the reaction ive always told him about actually happen to his son.
of course... now he comes after us with the Polysporin instead... we have to fend him off with a wooden stake (;

so far i am still hanging in there with the Bacitracin tho... it really is having good effect on the blistering. things are actually healing- and NOT coming back (hoping, & praying, it will be permanent this time) ...so what does that say? i guess its an entrenched infection of some kind after all. i am just being careful to apply only to the blisters themselves, keeping the salve off other unaffected areas since the petrolatum makes me itchy & blackheads like crazy (always has)

what a juggling act! and i dont think i said a single thing here about gelatin caps... so here's hoping some of these more or less random comments eventually prove helpful to some other searcher with the same problems!
cheers to all
kristy
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Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2010 - 1:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I haven't tried putting them in the freezer but if I did, I would cook them through but not browned and then freeze. Pulling it out of the freezer, I would just cook them from frozen like those hash brown patties we used to buy.

I am boiling some new potatoes right now to go with my roast and so I can make potato pancakes tomorrow with the leftovers. I'm also baking some sweet potatoes while the roast is cooking so I can make a pie later. I try to multitask when using the oven in summer. I will bake a pan of bread and the pie while the oven is hot from the roast.

For the bread, I am using Deb's tip for making white sauce in her book. She suggests cutting the butter into the flour for white sauce and then freezing in portions so she can just add milk to it for white sauce later. I am doing the same thing with bread. I like cutting butter into my flour for bread dough because it makes it rise and taste much better when cooking quick bread. I make up several packages by adding butter, baking powder, salt and flour in the food processor and blending until no hunks of butter remain. I then put them in the freezer in labeled ziploc bags for later. Tonight, I will get one of my bags out of the freezer and dump it in a bowl and add water (for bread, milk for biscuits) and pour into a buttered dish. Brush butter across the top and sprinkle some combo of herbs, onions, minced garlic, shredded cheese, etc. over that and bake. Yum!

BTW, I found some yeast grown on molasses at my local food co-op so we will be making some doughnuts this week. My son is so excited! He might lose some of his excitement after making the first batch, though, because I will insist he help and doughnuts are a lot of trouble for very little pay-off. If everyone had to make every doughnut they consumed, the things would have lost favor long ago. Haha
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, August 16, 2010 - 2:54 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeast grown on molasses sounds better than yeast grown on maltodextrin or other such substances. Hope it works for you. I would guess that the amount of sulfite residue in molasses, if it isn't organic, would be teeny. You're making me hungry, kristy. Time to make some quick bread!
Anon
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Posted on Monday, August 16, 2010 - 6:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, please elaborate on the tea that you make for your daughter. How much do you use and which products? How many cups per day? Does it really help to not have to rush to the bathroom during the day?
DebA.
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Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 5:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, will you once again give us the measurements that you mix and put into freezer bags...and the liquids that you add to make a loaf of your wonderful quick bread? There are many people who read this site every day and do not post. I hear from them via email thanking us for all the great tips here. Thanks!
kristy
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Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2010 - 9:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Guys, The tea was just a loose herbal tea that I have on hand (tea bags usually have corn adhesive so I only drink loose tea and now like herbal tea better than pekoe) containing marshmallow leaves. It's called Easy Day Tea from Mountain Rose Herbs (http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/tea_bev/tea_bev.php#ht_t_ed), but there may be others with more than one of the helpful herbs. I read a list of herbs helpful in calming urgency so I looked for something I had here with any of those herbs. Along with the tea, I also had horsetail powder and comfrey root powder on hand for something else and they were on the list, too. I just make her a cup of tea every morning and she takes horsetail and comfrey root as needed. She doesn't mind the flavor of them and just stirs them into tea or eats them off a spoon. When we were shopping, she just licked it off her palm and washed it down with water and it worked. I bought some tiny plastic containers just so we can take comfrey root and horsetail with us everywhere we go. She says they stop urgency in its tracks. She just takes about the amount that would fit in a capsule (half and half). She has suffered with this so much.....it was wonderful to see her finally have some relief. For what it's worth, I believe the herbs calm the spasming of the bladder that causes that feeling of urgency, but I'm not sure. I just know there were no contraindications or side effects of those herbs and they work like magic.

For the bread, I usually just cut chunks of cold butter (using the food processor) into all the dry ingredients from this recipe and freeze.

Awesome Quick Bread

4 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 tsp. my baking powder mix (half baking soda and half arrowroot powder - I leave out the cream of tartar because I am suspicious of it)
1 to 2 tsp. sea salt
1/2 to 1 stick butter or up to 8 tbsp. your preferred fat

I freeze this in baggies and when I get ready for bread, I put my oval corningware dish into the 400F oven with 2 to 4 tbsp. butter in it to melt. I put the bread mix into a bowl and add about 1 to 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar and a palmful of organic sugar (vinegar to help it rise and sugar to counteract the flavor of the vinegar) and enough filtered water to make a good dough (I have never measured the water successfully, but it takes in the neighborhood of 2 cups). You can add minced fresh garlic, onions, shredded cheese, diced peppers, sundried tomatoes, herbs, spices, etc. to your dough or you can just plop it into the pan once the butter is melted and sprinkle shredded cheese across the top. Use a pastry brush to bring up some of the melted butter from the sides to the top and bake. It takes about 35 - 45 minutes to bake in my deep oval corningware dish and about 25 minutes in my baking sheet (flatbread). This also makes a really good pizza crust. Once it is cooled, we slice it and make sandwiches or cheese toast from it or just eat a piece of it with dinner. I don't think we could go back to store bread if we had to at this point. We don't have this bread every meal, but I do make it at least twice a week.

Quick bread using King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 8:05 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kirsty, i just had my first attempt at your quick bread. Now im not sure what exactly went wrong (im no chef!! hehe) but mine didnt really rise much at all. Do you work the dough of your bread Kirsty or do you just mix in the water to make a dough and put straight in oven? Also (sorry, for all the questions) does the quantities you give make one bread in your oval dish?
Our bread is edible, the kids are going mad for it :-))) but i doesnt look risen like in your picture.
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 6:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't really work the dough or let it rise or rest or anything. The ones I made before I started adding vinegar didn't rise very much, but all of them since really rise well. Maybe you didn't have enough liquid. I don't really know how much liquid I add, but it isn't dry like a yeast bread dough, it isn't runny like pancakes, either. Thicker than cake batter but still moist enough you don't want to try to pick it up with your hands. If you think the amount of liquid is right, you could try a little more vinegar and play around with the temp you cook it.....stoves can be so different. One bag of bread mix makes one loaf like the one in the picture or one baking sheet full of flatbread. When using it to make pizza, I use olive oil instead of butter in the pan and I precook it about 12 minutes before topping it. I'll try to remember to take a picture of the dough for reference next time I bake a loaf.
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2010 - 11:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

mine looked like a regular bread dough, so i think that was the problem. It tasted fantastic and the kids loved it.It was just a bit heavy and not very risen. Thanks for your help, Ill have another go later and let you know how that goes. But it im pretty sure i just need to add more liquid.
ali
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Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 3:36 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

just had another attempt and i think this time i made it too wet.....ill get there!!!
kristy
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Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 7:01 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ali, if you are using commercial baking powder it may have less baking soda than my mix does. If that's the case, try increasing the amount of baking powder or just adding a little baking soda with your baking powder.
ali
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Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 7:44 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i did use baking powder because i was out of soda. Id normally use soda. I must say my second attempt, while still a bit on the heavy side (i made it too wet i think) is delicious. Weve nearly eaten the whole thing, just picking at it as we pass. Even Cai, my very fussy teenager, is finding it hard to resist. Thanks for the recipe and all the tips. Ill be sure to use baking soda the next time. I think ill be making it a lot!!
kristy
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Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 9:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One of the things we missed most when we weren't eating bread was garlic toast. Now, we slice this and spread butter and minced garlic (or garlic powder) on top and toast the pieces. It is so good with spaghetti or lasagna. My daughter's favorite is toasting pieces topped with diced onions and Kerrygold Blarney Castle cheese to eat with tuna salad or egg salad. My son loves roast beef and Kerrygold Swiss cheese open face sandwiches stuck under the broiler. I love them both!
ali
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Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 12:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

oooh, that all sounds good. The second bread has gone without a trace.It was divine!! We just ate it in chunks with butter on!! Looking forward to experimenting further. I like the sound of the garlic toast. Thats one thing i really miss too. Ive been hit so often with bread that Isla and i rarely eat it. The only bread i do buy and the others eat is polish bread. But i still suffer hives from it because the flour they use isnt organic. I have no problem with organic flours or regular wholemeal, but straight regular flour i just cant tolerate. The open sandwiches sound good!!
DebA.
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Posted on Friday, August 20, 2010 - 9:17 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Kristy. Here's Emily's great skillet bread..a must try, too. We love this, and I'm sure herbs, onions, or cheese can be added. Takes 5 minutes. Preheat oven to 400F. with skillet inside. Mix: 2 c. flour, 1 T. baking powder, and 1 t. salt. Add milk until it looks like thick pancake batter...about 1 1/2 c. Add 2 to 4 T. butter to the hot skillet and return to oven till it bubbles. Pour batter into skillet and bake 15 to 20 minutes. Amazing texture. I've added 2 t. sugar to the batter, too. The baking powder can probably be substituted by using 1 1/2 t. baking soda and then adding 1 T. plus 1 1/2 t. of fresh lemon juice or organic apple cider vinegar to the milk.
ali
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Posted on Friday, August 20, 2010 - 9:41 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

that sounds great deb. Ill try that one next. But im a bit confused as to what a skillet it. Ill google it and see what its called in Europe. Its amazing the differences we have in terminology sometimes.hehe.
Anon
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Posted on Friday, August 20, 2010 - 3:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Kristy! You've shared a lot of helpful information. Please continue to do so. It is appreciated. Also, a big thank you to Deb and her husband for keeping this website alive and going for all of us. Thanks so very much!
DebA.
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Posted on Saturday, August 21, 2010 - 11:44 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm chuckling (meaning laughing :-) ), ali. Skillet is such a common term here and it just struck me funny that it wasn't where you are. It's a heavy cast iron frying pan...mine is about 8 or 9 inches diameter. Happy eating! Sure is fun to chat with people all over the world.
DebA.
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Posted on Sunday, August 22, 2010 - 11:59 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ali, now you have me wondering what you call a heavy cast iron frying pan??? Maybe it would have been more correct for me to call it a cast iron skillet. Would that have explained it better. Sorry for any confusion I may have caused you.
ali
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Posted on Sunday, August 22, 2010 - 10:58 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well Deb, after asking a few people if they know what a skillet it ive discovered that our grannies used to use them all the time and they were called skillets just the same as you would call them. You just dont see them much anymore. We just tend to use the modern day frying pans now. Steel with non stick or aluminium. But they all have plastic handles so i wouldnt be able to put one of those in the oven. I recognised the word skillet, but just wasnt sure what exactly it was. Im in town later today an i will be looking in the hardware store to see if they are still sold. Ill let you know if i have any luck tracking one down. Failing that i will be keeping my eyes open at carboot sales and thrift shops. Ill be sure to snap one up if i come across one.

Thanks for your help
bo'nana
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Posted on Monday, August 23, 2010 - 7:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ali, you might also want to have a look in the antique shops too, as the really good cast-iron has a tendency to show up there.
i am still on the hunt for my skillet ... thought i'd discovered a whole set down at our local Salvation Army thrift, but put it back when i realized it was made in china. there is a huge difference in the cooking, between good antique iron and the recent stuff coming from china... my suspicion being that the new stuff is not really pure iron... it had a lightness and a shine to it that made me think another metal is being added now.

hold out for the really good old stuff- Griswold's and Wagner are both top quality, and i am sure there must be lots of others given that once upon a time its what EVERYONE used :-)
ali
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Posted on Monday, August 23, 2010 - 9:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the tips Bo'nana. I wouldnt have known to avoid the chinese made ones. Id never have considered that it wasnt "proper" cast iron. Last year at our local supermarket they had an offer on to buy a cast iron casserole pot with x amount of vouchers and a few euros. I got one,it was an absolute bargain. Proper big cast iron pot. I love it, couldnt live without it. Makes the best casseroles and stews!! :-)
DebA.
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Posted on Monday, August 23, 2010 - 11:25 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I found mine at a thrift store...old but well seasoned...nothing sticks with just a little oil. Okay, you got me for a minute with the word, "carboot" sales. I will guess that's called a garage sale here. :-)
ali
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Posted on Monday, August 23, 2010 - 11:48 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

it is what you would call a garage sale of sorts. A site is picked , maybe a large carpark or field and people sell their old wares from their car boots. I love them!
Deb A.
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Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2010 - 8:40 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, we have something like that here, Ali. There's one coming up soon called a community garage sale. People are setting up tables by their cars at the big arena parking lot. Should be fun. Love the expression, car boots...trunk or back of the car, I'm guessing??
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2010 - 9:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yes thats right, we call the trunk a boot. Funny how we speak the same language yet there are so many quirky little differences.
bo'nana
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Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2010 - 10:35 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

my mom & i just stopped at one, something like a gypsy swapmeet- a bunch of people pulled their campers into an empty field & squatted it for a rummage sale. it was lots of fun and soooo sensible really!
...once upon a time wasnt business always conducted in open air markets?
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2010 - 10:44 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

that sounds great bo'nana.An impromptu rummage sale. Hope you got lots of bargains!!
bo'nana
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Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2010 - 2:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

...more than we needed... :-)
Marsha
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Posted on Friday, August 27, 2010 - 12:40 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am so glad I looked at the site today. I had been eating bread from a bread company here in St. Louis (Companion Bread Company)that had listed ingredients as(unbleached wheat flour, yeast, water and salt and that's all) that's what the label said. So I had been eating it like crazy but getting sick. Always blaming the stomach aches on something else. When I called them I found out the label was wrong and it contained malted barley flour and was vitamin enhanced. I asked where they get the flour and they said Archer Danial Midland. I have not eaten any bread in about 2 months. Now I can't wait to try the new recipes. I can't say enough about how good I felt after I stopped eating the Companion Bread. Labeling..it is so aggravating.
kristy
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Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2010 - 6:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi guys, I just wanted to mention that you might also find cast iron skillets and dutch ovens in a camping store or store that sells hunting and outdoor equipment. Try to get the unseasoned and season it yourself if you have a choice. I don't know what they use to "pre-season" them, but it bothers me so I suspect corn or soy oil. My Bass Pro Shop even carries the dutch ovens with the feet on them designed to cook directly in the coals along with the tool used to lift off the hot heavy lid. Those kind have a concave lid so that you can pile coals on top to "bake" things like biscuits. I would love to learn to cook with one of those over an open wood fire - no charcoal because of the corn!
DebA.
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Posted on Thursday, September 02, 2010 - 12:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Marsha, that's wonderful to hear. It's always such an amazing revelation when we discover the cause of our suffering. I did that with some corn oil I tried the other day...found out it contained sulfites, which I always react to. Some other oils contain sulfites to prevent rancidity. I will stick to olive, organic coconut oil, butter, sunflower oil from Europe, and safflower oil.
ali
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Posted on Friday, September 03, 2010 - 12:49 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb, can i ask why you use european sunflower oil. I use it occasionally here in Ireland if i cant get hold of a good quality Olive oil in the village (when one shop is out of stock, the others follow suit and sometimes a week can pass before the shelves are replensished!!) Ive never had any problems with the sunflower oil but much prefer Olive oil. I was just curious as to why European sunflower oil?
ali
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Posted on Friday, September 03, 2010 - 1:13 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb, can i ask why you use european sunflower oil. I use it occasionally here in Ireland if i cant get hold of a good quality Olive oil in the village (when one shop is out of stock, the others follow suit and sometimes a week can pass before the shelves are replensished!!) Ive never had any problems with the sunflower oil but much prefer Olive oil. I was just curious as to why European sunflower oil?

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