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Food Activism?

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I've Just Made the MSG Connection" » Food Activism? « Previous Next »

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Anonymous
 
Posted From: 69.151.64.8
Posted on Monday, April 29, 2013 - 7:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is there anything we can do to force industries to change? Are there any groups trying to raise MSG awareness? No one should have to go to a store or restaurant and worry whether they're buying poison food. I really hope to see a change in our food industry someday soon. This is absolutely ridiculous.
sara
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Posted on Monday, April 29, 2013 - 10:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you can read the posts here and at msgtruth site - FDA doesn't want to hear that MSG is a problem (or that GMO's are either) - big ag and big pharma is paying them off somehow - they are also funding the research so if someone wants to say for example MSG is bad then they won't get any research money

as far as eating out, unless you know the restaurant and know they will consider your restrictions, or unless you follow Deb's ideas of asking for super plain things like steamed veggies (and check things out), you will be poisoned
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 69.151.65.43
Posted on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 12:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It shouldn't be that way. There needs to be some major changes. More people need to know about this.
sara
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Posted on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 3:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

we rarely eat out now and I usually pay for it when we do but not always
LisaS
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Posted on Wednesday, May 01, 2013 - 7:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Eating out used to be a huge part of our family's social lives. I wouldn't ever recommend anyone try eating out until they have gotten their reactions under control. But, I'm really lucky in that I react to a higher threshold than some and that I've been able to collect a list of restaurants locally that will work with me (I pretty much get the same meal each time and ask them to just double check for me - if they only have to check one it's much easier). One thing that helps a lot is that I carry a homemade card with my top five offenders, and usually if a restaurant food is going to have the lesser glutamate ingredients, it's going to have one of the "big 5" as well. Before I had the card, I got vague answers. Now, usually the chef or manager comes out and makes sure he understands it, and works with me carefully. Really amazing, the difference in respect (and it helps that they can bring the card back to the kitchen).
Dutchbabiesx2
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Posted on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 5:51 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My son is being tested this month for his reactions. Along with trying to find out if there is anything we can do to reduce his reactions (or turn it off) I, well my son too, are happy to have this conversation with the researchers and professors that will be part of the testing.

I tell anyone who will listen.

And eating out (Lisa S and I live in the same town) if you take the time to get to know locally owned restaurants, they are usually willing to accommodate and we have even found them learning about what is in the food they serve.
LisaS
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Posted on Tuesday, May 07, 2013 - 12:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Keep us posted about the testing!
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 70.199.228.47
Posted on Sunday, August 04, 2013 - 8:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sign the petition to Ban Monsanto's Genetically modified Food products in the United States http://wh.gov/lrWTQ
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Sunday, August 04, 2013 - 2:06 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Done. Thanks for posting.
Jerry Story
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Posted on Sunday, August 04, 2013 - 10:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Getting government to solve problems is a questionable idea. Government is the main cause of problems. Government solutions tend to produce the opposite of the intended effect.

Everything King Midas touched turned into gold.
Everything government touches turns into sh*t junk.
Jerry Story
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, August 05, 2013 - 4:46 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Yaron Answers: Product Labeling"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dmo2X-OBP8o
SistineKid
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Posted on Wednesday, August 07, 2013 - 8:18 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hello LisaS, what are your "big 5" ingredients? Thanks. SK
LisaS
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Posted on Wednesday, August 07, 2013 - 1:59 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is my worst FGA (free glutamic acid) offenders list. In short, Glutamate/MSG, "Protein" (the word), Carrageenan, Inactive Yeast, and Malt(odextrin). Artificial Sweeteners as well, kind of their own category.

Both my son and I react to/eliminate more ingredients than this, but a) I give this list to people just starting out, and if they are going from an typical American diet, removing these are enough to see a difference IME. And b) eliminating these tends to eliminate a large proportion of the foods that have glutamate in them, because usually glutamate ingredients, especially the lesser ones, rarely travel alone. (with the exception of modified starch -- does that tend to be a trigger for very many of you?)

(Taken from my blog: http://stroyan.net/lisasblog/2012/where-to-start-the-big-five-names-for-msg/)

Glutamate/MSG - This probably goes without saying :-) . There are different names for glutamate, however, and they vary by country.

Protein - There is nothing wrong with whole proteins; however, if the label says “protein” on it, it’s going to have FGA. Whether it’s hydrolyzed (which is the worst), isolate, or doesn’t say at all

Carrageenan: seaweed that has been processed with acid to break out the free glutamic acid. Watch out for this in almost all ice creams, soy milks, and whipping cream. We see horrible reactions to fairly small amounts of carrageenan.

Yeast: Any yeast that is not being used to leaven a loaf of bread or pizza dough is very likely added for flavor, and unfortunately is quite high in FGA. Many people put “autolyzed yeast” or “yeast extract” in their top three offenders list, but I’ve been noticing more labels that get away with calling it simply, “yeast”. Crackers, pastries, chips, chicken nuggets, and fish sticks are not leavened with yeast — it’s MSG in disguise. Breads and pizza should only list yeast once, in the dough, and preferably specify “active yeast”, and at the very least shouldn’t have “extract” or “autolyzed” next to them.

Malt(odextrin): Malting is a process which develops enzymes, including proteases, which break down the proteins in the grain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt). By far the worst offender in this category for us is Maltodextrin, which artificially malted through hydrolysis to produce a cheap sugar. However, malt extract, barley malt, malt syrup, and to a small extent, malted barley flour, have significant amounts of FGA in my experience.

(Plus a sixth that acts like FGA)
Artificial sweeteners: Aspartame/Nutrasweet, Sucralose/Splenda, and Acesulfame K all act on the same receptors as FGA. Alternatives are Stevia, Xylitol, and Lo Han extract such as in SlimSweet, which is my favorite.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Thursday, August 08, 2013 - 3:37 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Stevia, and Lo Han (which contains mogroside compounds), may even help prevent cancer. http://www.iupac.org/publications/pac/2002/pdf/7407x1309.pdf
evelyn
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Posted on Friday, August 09, 2013 - 7:16 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I should probably check the research again, but last I checked Stevia was not approved in Europe due to studies that had to impacts to male hormones. In Europe, a product has to be proven safe, not proven unsafe, like in the US. Been hearing good things about xylitol.
SistineKid
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Posted on Friday, August 09, 2013 - 10:23 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

LisaS,
thanks so much! Your reply is very much appreciated!

I'm in the process of eliminating what I need to in order to battle migraines/headaches, but I'm am uncertain if my reactions are from glutamate, amines, salicilates, sulphates, phosphates, etc.

I've also learned that some of the offending ingredients are not required to be labeled/declared if they are "processing aids" or are in concentrations below thresholds. That is maddeningly frustrating.

Re., yeast. I have found Utz Sourdough [Pretzel] Nuggets with ingredients of "wheat flour, salt, yeast, soda". Do you think that would that be yeast for leavening or flavoring?

I will read your blog. Thanks again!
SK
Deb A.
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Posted on Sunday, August 11, 2013 - 10:19 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeast in most pretzels is used for leavening, not flavoring. If you see the words yeast extract, yeast flavor, hydrolyzed or modified, or autolyzed yeast, avoid the product. And avoid pretzels that contain malt flavoring or malt.
LisaS
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Posted on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 - 6:50 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have had bad experiences with pretzels. Maybe it's the malt, but it might not be worth the risk, because the soda might be all they need for leavening. Or, you can call the company and ask if it's active yeast or dead yeast. Don't mention MSG, it shuts down conversation, just say you need to know if it's active or not.
Pat
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Posted on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 - 7:25 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lisa - I can't handle nutritional yeast & know audrolyzed (sp?) is bad. So therefore, I thought all yeast was bad.

When consuming it, which is the only yeast we should ingest?
By reading labels, how would one know the difference?
SistineKid
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Posted on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 - 7:43 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Lisa, thanks for your answer. I have noticed that some of their products list malt / malt flour as an ingredient. These particular ones do not. I've asked them...we'll see what they say. I may just avoid them regardless.
LisaS
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Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013 - 9:55 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I can't speak for anyone else but I don't have problems with active yeast that is used to raise bread and pizza dough (though other conditioners will be an issue in pizza usually). The problem is that it's hard to know which is which because they don't have to declare it. And, since I usually avoid malted barley flour, there are only a few choices. When I make my own I use Fleischmanns regular (I read somewhere not to use fast-acting if you are glutamate sensitive, and I don't use added "gluten" either because it's an extracted protein, my son reacted to it once).

I just went into Whole foods to look for crackers and lots of them are using the word "yeast", alone in an ingredient list, and I'm sure it's glutamate since crackers are never raised with yeast.

So here are my guidelines for myself: I only allow yeast that is in either bread or breaddough (not crackers, muffins, desserts - those are raised with baking powder or soda). It can only be listed once, and no other rising agents should be listed.

While we are on the topic of bread, watch out for whole foods. Their "wheat flour" contains malted barley flour and they don't have to declare it because barley is so closely related. OTOH, their blueberry coffeecake is fabulous and last year we used it every time we have to pick up a treat to share at church or whatever. (I haven't checked it lately). Also if you don't have to worry about oxalates their spelt bread is lovely.

For ordinary bread, my son eats Rudi's white or oat and doesn't react, though they have enzymes, wheat gluten, and maybe others that are questionable (we are a tad less sensitive than some here).
SistineKid
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Posted on Tuesday, September 03, 2013 - 2:48 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Lisa. That is good to know about yeast. I have checked multiple bread labels and see yeast multiple times. I know that yeast can be one of the catch-all entries, just like "enzymes"...I didn't know that malted barley flour can be unlabelled.
LisaS
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Posted on Friday, September 06, 2013 - 1:28 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I haven't seen unlabeled malted barley flour anywhere except whole foods -- so I suspect they get away with it on the made-in-store items.

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