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Test Diet - how hot is "high temp" co...

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I've Just Made the MSG Connection" » Test Diet - how hot is "high temp" considered « Previous Next »

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KMGood
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Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2011 - 6:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi all. I am new to this site and I think I am MSG sensitive. SO, I am going to do the test diet. I have the instructions and I am trying to prepare a meal plan for the month I am going to do it. My husband is a chef and is helping me. We read on the veggie section that we shouldn't cook with high heat, but it said we could sautee or steam the veggies. My husband said he would consider this high heat. Is steaming or sautee-ing on the stove ok? Is there a way to do this that is low heat?

Also, would rice flour be breaking the test diet, or would that be ok?

Thanks!
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011 - 1:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

KMGood,

Steaming is low heat, sauteing is high heat. Rice is lower in glutamate than other common grains.
Deb A.
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Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011 - 7:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

High heat on foods rich in protein, like meats, beans, fish, wheat, milk, and a few vegetables extremely high in glutamate, such as tomatoes, should be avoided. They should be simmered on a lower heat, or quickly sauteed on a higher heat. It is boiling for long periods of time that can be a real problem, as this creates or breaks down the naturally occurring glutamate in the pot. Protein food+water+heat=hydrolysis...hydrolyzed protein. Since the diet is for those who usually don't have our book yet, we make it simple and don't go into all the reasons why, which are answered in more detail in the book. Rice flour is fine...and if cooking rice, do so on lower heat. If using white rice, rinse well, since it is coated with glutamate containing substances.
Pat
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Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011 - 8:34 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb, Do beans cooked in a pressure cooker = glutamate? If yes, then I assume a slow cooker might be a better cooking alternative. Altho I've always made beans on top of the stove.
KMGood
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011 - 11:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you everyone, this clarifies things a lot! My hubby likes to know the particulars, b/c it opens up the diet to a few different recipes than we originally thought.

I've had occasional migraines all my life but for the past five years have had headaches everyday except when I'm high doses of anti-seizure/depression meds. We would like to try to get pregnant at some time, and can't do that on the meds. PLUS, I'm tired of feeling like this. SO, I'm excited to try this diet and see if this is the problem! If so, I'll be relieved!
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, May 02, 2011 - 10:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I soak beans over night, drain, add more water and simmer on low until done...have had no problem. But I have had a problem with quinoa and larger sized lentils. Do fine with the tiny French lentil...take less time to cook. As for cooking in a pressure cooker...since less water is used, it may be okay for some people.
kristy
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Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2011 - 5:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

KMGood,

Another purpose of the diet is to avoid hidden additives. There are many additives used in our food - many of them hidden in common foods not thought of as processed. Rice flour would be fine as long as it is pure with no additives. Also, avoid things like prewashed and bagged produce because they contain citric acid (GMO corn derivative). Citric acid and cornstarch are both pretty nasty additives and the problem is that they are commonly used in packaging and processing foods but not listed in the ingredients.

My kids and I are allergic to corn and soy so we have gotten quite good at avoiding all food additives, even the hidden ones. Since most additives are made from corn and those additives are high in FGA, it helps to cut them out. Here is a link to my blog that goes into more detail: http://www.livingitupcornfree.com/2010/06/living-corn-free.html
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2011 - 7:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Citric acid is bad for a few reasons. First, it is usually made GMO corn, and it contains free glutamate, the harmful component of MSG. Also, Jack Samuels of www.truthinlabeling.org suspects that it can be mixed with fillers like maltodextrin, that also contain free glutamate. As an acid, often added to canned foods like tomatoes, already rich in natural glutamate, it can break the bound glutamate into free glutamate. Cornstarch is rich in not only free glutamate, but chemicals often used to break down the corn kernel and help isolate the starch...one is food grade sulfuric acid, which will cause problems for some of us who are sulfite sensitive. Sulfites can be used in so many food processes, and not always on a food label.
bo'nana
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Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2011 - 1:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

gosh- & 'cornstarch' sounds so innocuous among all the other much more chemically sounding terms on ingredients lists... thanx for the timely reminder to keep avoiding the stuff, deb :-)

kristy! its good to see you on the board- ive sure missed your words of wisdom
how are you??
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2011 - 2:36 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is nothing innocuous about corn any more.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/05/05/the-dirty-secret-gmo-companies-dont-want-you-to-know.aspx
Jerry Story
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2011 - 11:03 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

About GM foods:
I quit corn some time ago, because it might be GM. Maybe it's not GM but I don't want to take the risk. If I had a squirrel or any animal that normally would eat corn, I would test it on the animal. Animals have the mysterious ability to tell whether it is GM. If it's GM, they don't eat it.
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2011 - 12:02 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

...except for livestock...

and hoomans
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2011 - 2:31 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jerry, since over 90% of U.S. corn is GM these days everyone should avoid it.
bobby
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Posted on Tuesday, August 23, 2011 - 4:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

is non gmo corn safe?

mexico has not joined th bandwagon yet...
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, August 23, 2011 - 9:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Eat fresh non GMO corn, but just don't over cook. I do okay with Trader Joe's canned corn, but eat corn rarely.
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2011 - 5:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Regarding corn: From OCA:

Another Unregulated, Unlabeled Frankenfood

Government regulation of genetically engineered crops, already weak, is increasingly non-existent. The latest example of this new hands-off policy is the commercialization of Monsanto's first flagship product for the produce aisle: genetically engineered sweet corn, containing the Bt toxin and herbicide-resistant genes.

Monsanto's new sweet corn produces Bt toxin, a genetically modified version of an insecticide from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Until now, Monsanto's Bt corn and cotton crops have mostly been used in animal feed and highly processed ingredients. Even with this limited exposure, Bt toxin has already been found in the blood of pregnant women and fetuses. No one knows what will happen to people who eat Monsanto's new Bt sweet corn, but Bt crops have proven deadly for grazing animals from livestock to monarch butterflies.

Monsanto's new sweet corn is also "RoundUp Ready," meaning it can tolerate unlimited amounts of Monsanto's herbicide RoundUp. Roundup causes endocrine disruption, damage to DNA, reproductive and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, and cancer, as well as birth defects. Many of these effects are found at very low doses, comparable to levels of pesticide residues found in food and the environment. Monsanto's new sweet corn will have a lot more RoundUp on it than non-genetically engineered varieties.


Stop Monsanto's New Sweet Corn!
Tell the President, Congress and the USDA to Safety Test and Label Genetically Engineered Foods!

If you want to avoid genetically engineered fruits and vegetables, add Monsanto's new sweet corn - along with squash, zucchini and papaya - to your list of organic-only items. Warning: the sweet corn was never reviewed by government regulators for safety or environmental impact and, like everything else on the shelves of US grocery and healthfood stores, it won't be labeled as GMO. It was bad enough when they fed it to livestock, now they want us to eat it too?

Take action here:

http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_23767.cfm
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2011 - 1:26 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Di, Thanks for posting this. I sent a letter per the link and urge everyone else reading this to do likewise.
bobby
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 5:46 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I make tortillas on a skillet with maseca, it`s a white corn flour they sell at supermarkets,

I use a skillet at high temperature, is that o.k.?

I cook the toritllas for about two minutes.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2011 - 3:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You will have to test them and see how you feel after eating them. All of us react differently depending on our degree of sensitivity.

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