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Protein Powder

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AdaLovelace
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Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2012 - 11:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey guys...
So my husband is in Cirque du Soleil and I've been explaining to him that protein powders contain MSG. I looked at the protein powder that's been collecting dust in our cupboard and literally every ingredient contains MSG or some other neurotoxin. Anyway, is there any kind of safe body building drink mix, supplement, or food ideas that you guys might have? He says that drinking weight gaining shakes really helps him put on muscle. The best I can think of off the top of my head is a smoothie with egg whites, almond milk, and perhaps fruit for taste and flavor.

Let me know what ideas you may have! :-)
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Friday, April 06, 2012 - 12:31 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ada, uncooked egg whites can deplete the body of biotin.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biotin_deficiency

Eggs and almonds both make this top list. Not sure about the caffeine, though:

http://www.menshealth.com/mhlists/foods_that_build_muscle/
Di
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Posted on Friday, April 06, 2012 - 10:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ada, Being that I a female with much different requirements than your husband, my opinion may not be applicable for him, but I feel the best nutrition comes from whole foods. Also, I have heard you need protein to build muscles.

I found this on livestrong.com (associated with world cyclist, Lance Armstrong):

Bicycle touring requires endurance, especially for trips that extend over more than one day. Any endurance athlete needs staying power and stamina during an intense workout. Getting the proper nutrients is key to maintaining the extra energy your body needs for cycling over long distances. Along with eating healthy meals, you need to eat food along the way to refuel your body. Some foods give you more of the nutrients you need.

Oatmeal
The more intense the physical exercise, the more protein your body needs. Oats are a whole-grain food that is high in protein and carbohydrates. Oatmeal is also packed full of fiber that helps stabilize your blood sugar throughout the day. Other sources of protein include lean meat, fish, poultry, eggs, low-fat dairy and peanut butter. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain 7 grams of protein, making it perfect for a quick snack. Low-fat dairy foods offer the added nutrients of calcium and vitamin D for strong bones and muscle. The seeds from quinoa -- a South American grain -- are another high-protein food that contains all nine essential amino acids, which your body needs to make protein.

Legumes
The body stores carbohydrates in the form of glycogen to use for fuel. When your body lacks fuel for energy, it becomes unable to maintain the same intensity of physical activity. Thatís why athletes need to eat a diet rich in carbohydrates to keep up adequate glycogen stores. Green vegetables and legumes including lentils, kidney beans, pinto beans and soybeans are foods that are excellent sources of complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates that you can eat on the go include nuts, seeds and fruits such as strawberries, grapefruit, apples, prunes and pears.

Vegetables and Fruit
The glycemic index is a measure of how quickly a food affects your blood-sugar level after eating. Foods with a low glycemic index release glucose into the bloodstream gradually. Fruits are a low-glycemic food that are digested slowly and help keep blood-sugar levels steady. Grapefruit, apples, pears, peaches, plums, oranges and grapes are some low-glycemic foods that have a glycemic value between 0 and 55. Broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery, onions and radishes are examples of nonstarchy vegetables that have low G.I. values and are low in calories, yet high in fiber and other healthy nutrients. Although starchy vegetables like yams, potatoes and corn have a higher glycemic index, they provide more carbohydrates for active athletes. Many fruits and vegetables also contain vitamin C and other antioxidant nutrients that help repair damaged tissue.

Salmon
Because your body canít produce omega-3 fatty acids on its own, you must get these essential fatty acids through diet. EFAs help your muscles recover after an intense workout and therefore may be beneficial to athletes involved in activities like cycling that require high levels of endurance. Salmon is a good source of omega-3, along with halibut, herring and other fatty saltwater fish. The American Heart Association recommends including fish in your diet at least twice each week. Flaxseed, soybeans, nuts and seeds are other sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which may lower triglycerides and increase healthy cholesterol levels.

Iron and Potassium-Rich Foods
Without minerals, your body won't work properly. Rigorous exercise affects the levels of potassium, sodium and iron in the body. Oranges and bananas are food sources high in potassium. Bananas also trigger the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that improves focus. Low dopamine levels are often associated with fatigue and low energy levels. Iron is a mineral that carries oxygen to the muscle cells. During periods of prolonged exercise, the body loses iron in urine and sweat. Easy foods high in iron include enriched cereals, pumpkin and sesame seeds, baked potato and wheat germ.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Friday, April 06, 2012 - 12:23 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Di, My favorite on the list is salmon, but I would avoid soy, and iron is not recommended for men.
Di
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Posted on Friday, April 06, 2012 - 2:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I avoid soybeans unless they are organic (and this goes for many of the other foods listed above because they are on the "dirty twelve" list). As far as iron, yes, men should not take iron as a supplement, but foods that happen to contain it are fine.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Friday, April 06, 2012 - 3:10 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Di, I take no iron supplements, but tend to have elevated iron levels and am not happy about the fortification of grain products with iron.
Di
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Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2012 - 1:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Roy, I should have clarified what I said....foods that happen to contain it naturally....

Fortified with vitamins/minerals is tantamount to taking a supplement. You always have to read the label if it's not a whole food.

And of course, if someone has a certain condition, they must be careful about eating/not eating certain things.
ShannonU
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Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2012 - 3:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When my husband got home from the hospital, he had lost a lot of weight and the Dr. said he needed protein. I made him smoothies that had bananas, soy or rice milk, powdered peanut butter and some other ingredients. He loved them and tolerated them very well.
At Whole Foods I noticed they had some Hemp protein and also Rice protein that had very few additives. I was too nervous to try it, though.
LisaS
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Posted on Sunday, April 08, 2012 - 5:28 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anytime a protein is extracted, you have to look at how they extract it. So the Hemp and Rice protein would be suspicious in my book.

We have had OK results with Jarrow Ultrafiltered Whey protein. It's the only protein I've found that has no isolate in it -- it's entirely cold-processed at low-pressure from what I have read.

You also have to look at the sweeteners too. Lo Han is one of my favorites, as it is all natural and doesn't cause any glutamate reaction for us.

I just noticed that the Jarrow does have guar gum -- not sure if mine does as it's several years old ; we just don't find a need for it anymore. So it's possible we would react to it now, I'm not sure.

But -- if you are set on a protein additive, I think this is the one to try, personally. Here's a place that lists ingredients. http://www.soap.com/p/jarrow-formulas-whey-protein-powder-2-lbs-63292
Hoteru
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Posted on Monday, April 09, 2012 - 3:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All,
I have been using a rice protein supplement for more than 10 years now. I react strongly to other protein supplements, whey, soy, etc. Haven't tried hemp. I react to FGA much more than most on this board but not as much as some some. I find it important to keep in my purse some powdered rice protein which I can mix with water. I often leave home and don't get back for more than 12 hours nowdays and generally can't find anything I can safely eat if I don't carry it myself. If I don't eat I am concerned about passing out and find the rice protein does the trick.
LisaS
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Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2012 - 4:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hoteru, can you share what brand you use? That's interesting to know that rice powder is not nearly as bad from your experience. Could you also look if it says anything about "undenatured" or "filtered" or "isolate"? I'm wondering if it is the brand, or the rice, that makes the most difference.
Hoteru
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Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2012 - 2:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lisa,
Nutribiotic Rice Powder, the plain one, not vanilla or chocolate. It now comes organic and I haven't had any trouble with that although I anticipated having trouble when they changed the formula. I buy it at Whole Foods, it appears to be available online as well. They have little one serving packets for sale, you might want to try one of those first as the regular plastic jar I get is about $24.00.
LisaS
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Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 5:49 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Hoteru. Here is what I found: "NutriBiotic Vegan Rice Protein is produced by means of a unique enzyme process. A proprietary blend of organic plant enzymes are used to separate the fiber and carbohydrates from the protein portion of the whole grain brown rice. Low temperatures used during processing prevent denaturing of the amino acids. NO CHEMICALS are used at any time. "

So, FGA content would depend on the enzyme used, but it's a good sign that they claim the protein is not denatured.
Lana
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Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 8:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, I have not written on this site very much, however, I do read lots of your postings as I am trying so hard to figure out this diet. If someone has some extra time, I was hoping they might be able to answer some of my questions. Hopefully, someone who is both gluten and sulfite sensitvie.
1. Does anyone know where I can purchase beef that is safe for both gluten and sulfites? I do eat Costoc organic hamburger, butI would love to be able to eat something besides hamburger. I have tried organic beef prepackaged at Whole Foods, but it did bother me.

2. Are there any fruits that have naturally occurring sulfites that I should steer clear of?

3. I am looking for gluten and sulfite safe tea. Does anyone know where I could purchase either safe tea bags or just organic tea leaves? Are there some types of tea leaves that are better than others.

4. If organic brown or white rice bother me, do I have any other options for rice?

5. What kind of potatoes are both gluten and sulfite safe? As I have tried organic, and they still bothered me.

6. Lastly, do almonds have naturally occurring sulfites?

I will greatly appreciate any bit of help I can get. Thank you all very much in advance.
LisaS
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Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2012 - 6:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Lana,

Are you looking for gluten free, or glutamate free? This list focuses on glutamates, though probably some people are also gluten free.

Lisa
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 4:02 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I purchased the organic Nutribiotic Rice Powder in vanilla flavor. It does contain FGA, but if it's bound then it shouldn't be a problem. It also contains "certified organic vanilla flavor"... what do you think that means?

Anyway, I had a smoothie with frozen bananas, water, the protein powder, and some egg whites this morning and it was delicious! And I feel great today. :-) I know it's better to eat "real" foods but this was a nice treat.
evelyn
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Posted on Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 4:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ada - the F (in FGA) stands for Free. I see it says 'naturally occuring amimo acids' and lists Glutamic acid. I'm noting it has the highest concentration and would question what they mean by 'naturally occurring'. Do they mean that it occurs naturally, but they have concentrated it in this formula by means of the processing you mention above? I'm not keen on any protein powders because they are not natural. I guess that if you find it doesn't bother you...

I don't have answers for Lana, but beef is not gluten free?
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 5:39 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oops Evelyn! That's what I meant to say. I wonder why the level of glutamic acid is higher than the other amino acids. Maybe it's better to just shy away from all protein powders, even this supposedly safe one! :-)
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 8:58 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Haha, perhaps it was a Freudian slip? :-) Who knows. I did send an order of it to a friend that uses a feeding tube. Mostly what they feed people with feeding tubes are drinks such as Ensure... scary stuff. :-( I know she said she's been having SEVERE cramping since her surgery and all the MSG in those liquids could be at least part of the reason.
evelyn
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 4:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I did a complete food elimination diet end of last/start of this year due to acute allergies and the "medical food" I used for it can be used for tube feeding as well. It was the best choice, I think under the circumstances, though it was not perfect. I did pretty well with it. It's called Elecare and is a full food replacement supplement. Also not cheap at $200/case. In your friend's case though, insurance would have to cover it, I'd imagine. Why is she on tube feeding, if you don't mind me asking?
Lana
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 4:07 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lisa S., I am sorry, I am looking for glutamate free. Thanks.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 4:58 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

She has ALS. Do you know where I can find the ingredients for Elecare? Thanks!
evelyn
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 5:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good to know Lana - that would be lots of us! As a matter of fact there is a connection. From my laymen's understanding, of the research I have done, someone who is sensitive to sulfites has an error in sulfur metabolism pathway - one result of which is the body producing less taurine. Taurine is an inhibitory neurotranmitter (opposite of glutamate, which is an excitatory neurotransmitter). Some are able to use diet alone to reduce the glutamate they ingest - and for the most part that refers to Free Glutamic acid as opposed to bound - though some folks are sensitive enough to glutamate for high amounts of naturally occurring glutamate to bother them. It took me a very long time to realize benefits of removing FGA (to the best of my ability, from my diet. In hind sight, knowing what I know now about sulfites and taurine, I would have sped up the recovery process by replacing my depleted taurine much more rapidly. We are all different, but for me, adding taurine made all the difference. As for your specific questions:

1. Does anyone know where I can purchase beef that is safe for both gluten and sulfites? I do eat Costoc organic hamburger, butI would love to be able to eat something besides hamburger. I have tried organic beef prepackaged at Whole Foods, but it did bother me.

Beef should not be a big source of FGA, it is possible your cooking method or something you are adding or eating with it is the real culprit? What is your reaction?

2. Are there any fruits that have naturally occurring sulfites that I should steer clear of?

No fresh fruits bother me, dried fruits are a problem.

3. I am looking for gluten and sulfite safe tea. Does anyone know where I could purchase either safe tea bags or just organic tea leaves? Are there some types of tea leaves that are better than others.

Was not aware of tea with sulfites - not enough glutamate in them to bother me, so no recommendations on that one.

4. If organic brown or white rice bother me, do I have any other options for rice?

Rice - don't eat it anymore, so no recommendations there either, sorry. Was not aware others have issues with it. I'm generally sensitive to grains in general. Quinoa is a great rice substitute, but is not cheap! In bulk I can get it for $2.5o/pd - single pound will run you $3 if you are lucky - $4 or more, if not.

5. What kind of potatoes are both gluten and sulfite safe? As I have tried organic, and they still bothered me.

Potatoes are naturally high in glutamate - I don't eat them either.

6. Lastly, do almonds have naturally occurring sulfites?

I know of any fresh foods high in natually occurring sulfites - except, according to this list, shrimp and what do you know, it popped up on my blood test, so I was already avoiding it.

http://allergies.about.com/od/foodallergies/a/sulfites.htm

That's all I got for now, Lana! Fresh food, taurine and whatever other things you may be deficient in, or benefit from more of, such as B2, magnesium - again we are all different! I do avoid dairy as well, it is commonly ultrapasturized, though you can find dairy that is not. For me, it is easier to limit my diet than go to the trouble to find suitable substitutes. My motto - If God didn't make it, I don't eat it!

Plus Taurine - which is a life saver for me - the only us produced pure taurine powder I have been able to find for purchase (there is supposedly another american manufacturer in TX, but I have not been able to find them) I buy online from Nutrabio.com It's cheap enough to try and see if it helps you.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 5:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ingredients for Elecare:

http://abbottnutrition.com/Downloads/61630_006%20EleCare%20Quick%20Reference.pdf
evelyn
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 5:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That was 'I DON'T know of any fresh foods high in natually occurring sulfites', btw...

Ada - you posted while I was composing the above dissertation. Thanks for responding Roy. And reading that again reminds me that I did find myself craving salty foods all the time, when I first started the Elecare and determined (from RDA table and a little help from my friends here) that the electrolytes were at the right levels for a child and were about 1/2 of the RDA for an adult, so supplementing the Elecare with Hammer electrolyte powder helped.

Nasty stuff, ALS, one of the things I was tested for early on due to similar symptoms I experienced from FGA poisoning. I would guess that FGA could definitely exacerbate ALS symptoms - wonder if the taurine might be helpful for your friend too, Ada, as it helps balance electrolytes at the cellular level.
evelyn
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 6:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

BTW - since taste is not a factor for your friend, Ada - unflavored may be a better option, though I'm not seeing a difference in the ingredients:
http://abbottnutrition.com/Products/elecare-jr
Hoteru
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 6:20 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All,
Greetings to all who read/post here!
The NutriBiotic protein powder I use is the plain,as I mentioned, not the vanilla version AdaLovelace mentioned purchasing on 4/24. I am glad she was able to tolerate it but I can't take a chance with a vanilla, chocolate, or any flavoring. Just not willing to go through the misery it might cause. Had enough and I am not going to take it any more!
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 11:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Hoteru. I wish I knew what was in the vanilla flavoring... usually I never purchase anything that says the word "flavor" :-) ...even if I know that it's a "safe" product, because I don't want to to support companies that are deceptive with their labeling. :-)
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 11:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is a side note... but I just got this contraption, and it makes REALLY yummy banana ice cream: http://www.yonanas.com/

Alternately if you have a juicer that eliminates pulp from a spout (such as the Champion brand) it will do the same thing!
Deb A.
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Posted on Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 1:17 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some of us will find that we react to the rice protein products over time as the glutamate builds up to a toxic level..then we may sense something is "off"...same with vitamins...may take many days or a couple months if we use it often. Remember that glutamate is the most prevalent amino acid found in nature, and that foods high in protein will most likely contain more glutamate. Naturally sulfur-rich foods are garlic, onions, cabbage, broccoli, etc. I do okay with them, and I am very reactive to sulfites as food additives. But I do take taurine. I like dried fruits, so look for ones that are not treated with sulfur dioxide.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 1:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Deb. That is a great point that we might feel fine at first until it builds up. I contacted the company, and they said that "the vanilla flavoring in all of our rice protein is derived from vanilla bean."
LisaS
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Posted on Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 9:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently found this list for avoiding sulphur:
http://www.readingtarget.com/nosulfites

For beef: Ask for an ingredient list. I have seen some ground beef that contains natural flavor, though usually only in burger patties, not bulk. Haven't ever seen it at Whole foods though.

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