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English Cucumber?

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sara
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Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2011 - 4:19 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Any experience or insight would be appreciated.

These are these long, plastic wrapped ones - right now they are coming from Mexico - sometimes they come from Canada I think.

I bought one, have had it 3 times - each time I have seen an increase in symptoms but am trying to figure out if it is the cucumber setting it off or something else.

I am assuming something in the water they use to grow these or like.
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, February 28, 2011 - 8:23 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tried one last year and had the same reaction. I suspect that since they have to travel, that they may be fumigated first with sulfur dioxide or nitrogen dioxide, or they many be sprayed with citric acid, as a lot of vegetables are today. The plastic wrap may also contain a preservative.
sara
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Posted on Monday, February 28, 2011 - 11:57 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks

the reaction wasn't the same as the one yesterday when I had a bowl of homemade bean mix soup - I made sure I didn't overdo it yesterday and the reaction was a lot milder

just 2 days ago when I posted I had eaten the same things for lunch (our main meal - my first meal of day actually) except I had cuke slices (lots of them instead of snap peas and cauliflower) - same package of chicken, same stick of butter, same package of rice

4 days ago I had had the cuke slices with other things and a week ago I had the first of them (same large cucumber) but was trying to blame the reaction on something else - I hadn't had cukes in the time I have kept the daily log except for these 3 times - same cuke

I would say the reaction to the combo of the cuke and Safeway Organic red skin gold potatoes in sacks 4 days ago (I think they were bad too) was as intense as the original Thanksgiving turkey reactions which set me thinking more and more about MSG and what else it was in besides the obvious MSG labeling
kristy
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Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2011 - 7:48 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure what they do to cucumbers in plastic, but I can't eat the large English ones or the "baby" ones that are wrapped 4 to a package (styrofoam tray with plastic wrap) or the big old corn waxed ones (these are no great loss as they barely qualify as cucumbers to me). I am down to only eating cucumbers when they are in season from the farmers market. BTW, peppers are the same way. There are always so many beautiful peppers, both hot and bell, at my store but they are all waxed with corn wax. I buy extras from the farmers market when they are in season and dehydrate them for winter. I ran out this winter so I clearly need to step it up this year. I'm thinking I should dehydrate some cucumbers so I can at least have tzatziki sauce in the winter.....I miss cucumbers so much.
sara
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Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2011 - 6:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have never seen trays of "baby" cukes I don't think. I have seen containers of baby bell peppers (assorted colors) our here in WA.

I did buy another English cuke the other day but I don't plan to eat this one - well maybe try a slice or so but I got it for my husband not me; for me I got some radishes, an extra cauliflower and a couple heads of broccoli. I have been making slaw out of the broccoli stalks and cauliflower cores these days too.
kristy
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Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2011 - 9:19 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's a good idea making slaw out of the stalks. My kids balk at eating them even when I dice them in small pieces so I have been putting them in my baggie of "stock veggies" in the freezer. I do make slaw quite a bit and I could slide those stalks right in there without them noticing. Genius!

BTW, I found beautiful daikon radishes at the Asian grocery all winter long and we have enjoyed them so much. If you like radishes, you must try a daikon. They always have them at Kroger but they are so rubbery and old that I never buy them. I have been cutting them up into french fry shapes and we snack on them every day. They are sweeter than regular radishes and one daikon gives you the same amount of food as 15 small red ones so it's much faster. The owner told me that she often will julienne them and stir fry with oil that has been flavored by cooking ginger in it. She also puts them into soups - I've never even tried them cooked but now I am going to have to...
sara
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Posted on Friday, March 04, 2011 - 7:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We eat turnips raw - my husband won't eat radishes but will eat turnips. I try to slice them about 1/3 inch thick (or less) then take the skin off with a paring knife. I have then turned them into french fry shapes and taken them to potlucks with other veggies.

I have a salad shooter and use it to make slaw so cutting up the cauliflower core and broccoli stalk is easy. I just bought a new finer shredder core and am using it often now. I can cut up a whole head of cabbage in a few minutes with it. I put lots of carrot shreds in all my slaws too but it does destroy the softer veggies.

The week before Thanksgiving our little local grocery had "brussel sprout trees" for $3 but didn't try to cut the stalk up. It was a lot tougher but we got a giant strainer full of sprouts off that tree and that was my yearly fill (or more) of them. I did see recipes for soup using them.
kristy
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Posted on Friday, March 04, 2011 - 7:32 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wish my store would carry the brussel sprout trees. The ones in my produce department always look so anemic....
sara
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Posted on Friday, March 04, 2011 - 8:40 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is a once a ;year thing I think - they were in a giant cardboard box like for watermelon out in front of the entrance that day - we saw them a year ago about Thanksgiving too but didn't buy one them.

I really don't care for them myself but figured I could get a couple day's worth out of it and he wouldn't harass me and say we never have brussel sprouts for a while. The 2 days turned into 4 giant servings for each of the 2 of us. I saw truncated trees at Safeway about a month ago.
ali
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Posted on Saturday, March 05, 2011 - 1:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We only get brussel sprouts from November to February. Only my husband likes them and i have to buy a huge bag of them. I got sick of the waste and started freezing them. they freeze really well. I blanch them for just a few minutes in boiling water, drop into ice cold water and dry them off, then pop them in the freezer in ready to go portions. They take 15-20 minutes to cook from frozen in simmering water or in the steamer.
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2011 - 10:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like to drain them just before they are done and then stir fry in olive oil for a few minutes. I like the caramelized bits that stir frying gives them. If you can have soy sauce and sesame seeds, they are even better. Of course, the best ones I ever ate were stir fried with bacon grease. 8^)
sara
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Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011 - 8:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had baked some one of those days with olive oil sprayed on them and chives and parsley dumped on them. It was different and good.
Deb A.
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Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011 - 9:43 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like to make a cream sauce, then add brussel sprouts that have been simmered till partially cooked. I also par-cook carrots and broccoli and cauliflower, drain and add to the cream sauce... pour into a casserole dish, sprinkle with a little jack or mild cheddar and bake till bubbly. You can season the sauce with any herbs or spices you like.
kristy
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Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2011 - 10:12 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb, that sounds really good. Maybe I could even get my son to eat cauliflower that way. 8^) I don't understand how anyone could hold a grudge against cauliflower the way he does, but my son refuses to eat it raw or cooked....I like putting it into salads or coleslaw raw but also like making fauxtatoes out of it by steaming or boiling it, then pureeing with butter and milk. It also makes one of the best pickles I've had.

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