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Supplement for Protein Digestion

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Anonymous
 
Posted From: 99.237.221.9
Posted on Monday, November 15, 2010 - 7:23 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Everyone,

Has anyone had success finding a supplement to help with protein digestion other than Betaine HCl which I react to?

Melinda started a thread a while back and said she was experimenting with two supps containing bitter herbs but never followed up to tell us how those worked for her.

I could try Apple Cider Vinegar 30 minutes before a meal but that stuff makes me gag.

Any help would be much appreciated!
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, November 15, 2010 - 11:32 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hi anon... Hcl also seemed to make me feel more ill rather than better, altho i know i am chronically deficient in stomach acid (result of a bad sensitivity to soy that went too long without dx'd)

i have been taking liquid herbal bitters for several years, not all the time, just as needed... you know when you need them (my son describes it as "the bubble-bubble" feeling)
burns going down, but works great!

good blends to look for might include herbs like
Turmeric
Yellow Dock
Hyssop
Red Root/Ceanothus
Dandelion
Burdock
Gentian
...and i would definitely recommend getting the alcohol based tincture over glycerine based, if you can tolerate it- the alcohol starts getting into your system the moment you take it, whereas glycerine requires an acidic catalyst to really work. which seems to defeat the purpose, if you need to boost acids in the first place, ha ha :-)


also if youre having trouble with cider vinegar, it can be mixed into hot tea and sweetened with honey, just as effective and much tastier
or, skip the vinegar & use lemon juice instead, its good too

hope that helps!
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, November 15, 2010 - 10:04 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lacto-fermented vegetables (process used to make traditional sauerkraut) contain probiotics that stimulate digestion. I always eat a fermented food immediately preceding and along with proteins. For instance, I make an onion and pepper relish that I always serve with meat. I also make cucumber pickles and we eat them with meals as well. Once I got started, I learned that pickles don't have to be confined to cucumbers so I routinely make thinly sliced onions and beets, carrot sticks with ginger, carrot sticks with jalapenos, jicama or daikon radish with pickling spice, garlic cloves, chunks of ginger and turmeric for juicing, dilled cauliflower florets, etc. Not to mention the traiditional fermented dishes from other countries: cortido, kimchi, etc. Commercially available pickles are made with distilled or white vinegar which is made from corn. Lacto-fermentation is an excellent way for us to have pickles again and made this way they are actually good for us.

I am allergic to corn so I have had no luck finding digestive enzymes without corn (they are created using maltodextrin in the lab) so it was a necessity for me to find another solution. The lacto-fermented veggies have really worked for me and I was chronically low in stomach acid production as well. If you don't like the idea of pickles, you might try raw milk kefir. This is a fermented dairy product with some of the same live active cultures present (and more!) as the fermented veggies. BTW, I don't buy any fermented products (I fear the FGA content) but have had no FGA issues from ferments made at home. Also, if you just can't find raw milk, culturing (making yogurt or kefir from) the dead stuff from the store will restore some of the healing properties it possessed before they were cooked out of it, but be aware that vitamin D fortified milk contains GMO corn oil as a vitamin carrier.
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 99.237.221.9
Posted on Tuesday, November 16, 2010 - 4:48 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

bo'nana,
Thanks for the tip about glycerin vs. alcohol-based tinctures. Will be on the lookout. I used to take Swedish Bitters years ago but I found the taste so objectionable. Maybe I will see how I do with lemon juice in water...

kristy,
Yes, I already buy lacto-fermented veggies but have been eating them at the end of the meal. I will start eating them at the beginning of my meal and along with my protein - thanks for that tip!
I would love to learn how to ferment my own veggies. You sound like a pro. Where did you learn to make your delicious-sounding recipes? Any books you use or blogs you subscribe to that you can recommend would be appreciated.
BTW - what is FGA?
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 99.237.221.9
Posted on Wednesday, November 17, 2010 - 4:05 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

kristy,
Yes, I already buy lacto-fermented veggies but have been eating them at the end of the meal. I will start eating them at the beginning of my meal and along with my protein - thanks for that tip!
I would love to learn how to ferment my own veggies. You sound like a pro. Where did you learn to make your delicious-sounding recipes? Any books you use or blogs you subscribe to that you can recommend would be appreciated.
BTW - what is FGA?
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, November 23, 2010 - 11:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Anonymous, Here is a link to my blog post about fermented veggies: http://www.livingitupcornfree.com/2009/11/fermented-vegetables-are-easy-and-fun.html
and here is the link to my favorite ferment recipe: http://www.livingitupcornfree.com/2010/03/fermented-onion-relish-homemade-and.html

The first post describes my method and gives links to books that I found invaluable in my fermentation experiments. It is really fun to do (my kids even like making them) and it amazes me every time. You might find pickled veggies in brine the easiest way to start:

Get a quart mason jar (large mouth) with lid. Wash and chop any veggie or combo of veggies into large bite size pieces. (Cucumbers are traditional, but you can try cauliflower florets or carrots cut into sticks since there are no pickling cucumbers in season right now. Very thin slices of organic beets and onions are very good {and beautiful}, too.) Pack the veggies into the jar and then pour in the brine. The brine is made by adding 2 Tbsp sea salt per quart filtered water. Pour it over the veggies leaving one inch of head space. Put the lid on the jar hand-tight and leave it for 3 or 4 days. You should notice it bubbling after 2 or 3 days. Don't be afraid to add red pepper flakes, ginger slices, onions, dried herbs or garlic, parsley, pickling spices, or whatever you think would suit your tastes. After the first success, you'll be addicted. I swear I love finding new combos. One of my favorites is cabbage rejuvelac - I drink it all day long. Very refreshing and healing. Just take 1/4 organic green cabbage, 1 T sea salt and put into a 2 quart container (I use a glass pitcher). You can pound the cabbage a little before adding to the pitcher, but I don't bother. Just fill the pitcher up with filtered water and leave on the counter for 3 days. Once it is sufficiently fermented, just strain out the cabbage and keep in the fridge to drink small amounts throughout the day. I like this much more than eating plain sauerkraut - I have even added a dash of cayenne pepper on occasion.

I find this extremely easy to do while making salad or chopping veggies for dinner. I usually keep several different varieties in my fridge at any given time. I love this method because it does allow you to try a quart of this combo, a quart of that combo, and keep a variety. Some people make huge crocks of sauerkraut, but I would find that boring. Remember to try to include healing foods like onions, garlic, ginger, turmeric, herbs, spices, hot peppers, etc. My pickled elephant garlic cloves are legendary around here. I like adding them to my veggie juice (I just run them through the juicer with the rest of the veggies) and hummus or other dips and I use the juice in salad dressings. I once cured an absessed tooth by swishing with fermented garlic juice mixed with warm water and sea salt several times per day. It works great for sore gums, toothaches or canker sores, too.

I don't check the board every day, but do try to check in every week or so. If I don't answer on here, you can contact me through my blog. I'll help you any way I can, I remember how apprehensive I was the first time I fermented anything. Good luck.

Oh, FGA is free glutamic acid.
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 99.237.221.9
Posted on Tuesday, November 23, 2010 - 6:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for these great tips, Kristy!
Hoteru
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, November 24, 2010 - 2:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

kristy,
You are probably not aware that garlic, vineger, that you recommended in another post, and fermented anything are very high in FGA and would make some of us very sick. There is a wide variance in tolerance among us and your innocent suggestions have the potential to do great harm to those, like me, who are very sensitive. There are quite a few on the board even more sensative than I am and have seizures, atrial fibrillations or other medical emergencies caused by ingesting FGA.
It takes most of us quite while to know what is safe and what is not for each one of us.
Please stay on the board and learn more, information comes to us little by little.
All of us are here to support each other and share information that can help each other with this puzzling condition.
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, November 25, 2010 - 6:06 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hoteru, we have discussed this before about fermented veggies. In fact, in an earlier post I described my reaction to "fridge pickles" made with apple cider vinegar after the second day. I had attempted to make pickles that I could eat when I realized my corn allergy. I thought that my problems with pickles were confined to corn vinegar but I quickly discovered that the fga released by vegetables submerged in vinegar in the fridge for two days was a huge problem for me. This led me to discover fermented veggies. IN MY OPINION, the benefits of the natural probiotics outweighed the risks. YOUR MILEAGE MAY VARY. PROCEED WITH CAUTION.

In an earlier post I stated that I use extreme caution when fermenting and have found that home fermented veggies (avoiding high glutamate level veggies like tomatoes and mushrooms) do not cause me any problems when ACV pickled veggies do. The only explanation that I have for that is that the commercial fermentation process must be vastly different than home fermentation (perhaps artificially accelerated with an unknown substance or process).

In the end, everyone is responsible for deciding what to try and what to give up on....I wasn't willing to give up on pickles so I chose to keep trying things. I find it helpful when others share their experiences and wanted to return the favor. Don't tell me I need to start prefacing every post with a detailed disclaimer - I thought the "I am not a doctor so don't mistake any of my posts as medical advice" was understood, but I do pepper my posts with warnings in any case:

"BTW, I don't buy any fermented products (I fear the FGA content) but have had no FGA issues from ferments made at home." Was this not sufficient?

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