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Using different grains

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Using different grains « Previous Next »

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EmilyS
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Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 7:50 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Iím concerned that Iím eating too much wheat in my diet and Iíd like to start using other grains. Iíve been experimenting with oat flour, rye flour, spelt flour and kamut flour but would also like to look into other grains. For those of us that are msg sensitive, are there some grains that are better for us than others? Does anyone else use other grains? Any advice on where to start?

It seems like Carol doesn't eat wheat but I did several searches and couldn't come up with any threads that talked about what grains would be best to switch to.

Thanks,
Emily
Jennifer
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Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 1:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rice seems to be a good choice. I don't have problems with it, unless it's leftover. I have to freeze immediately what I don't eat.

There are a few rice pastas - there's one that's a Canadian product that I tried, and it wasn't too bad. I can't remember the name, though.

Jennifer
EmilyS
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Posted on Sunday, March 08, 2009 - 11:44 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Jennifer. Do you use rice flour for anything?
Jennifer
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Posted on Sunday, March 08, 2009 - 8:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use it as a thickening agent for sauces, etc. I'm not sure how you're supposed to use it, but if you add it to your food and get it hot, it gets thick. Flour should be cooked in fat before adding liquid (roux), or boiled, but that doesn't seem to be necessary for rice flour. Cornstarch loosed a LOT of it's power if brought to a hard boil. I haven't found the answer to boiling sauces with ice flour, but it seems fairly forgiving.

Trader Joe's has some organic rice pasta - at about half the price of the other I was thinking of. I also noticed it was made in Canada, so it's probably the same stuff. Cook it about 2/3 the recommended time, and it's al dente.

Jennifer
Deb A.
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Posted on Sunday, March 08, 2009 - 10:57 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like to coat canned salmon patties with rice flour...nice and crisp. I use it half and half sometimes in most baked goods other than yeast bread, where more protein is required. Have yet to try it in Emily's delicious skillet bread.
EmilyS
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Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 12:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the ideas! Deb- do you mean you mix in a little rice flour in a cookie or muffin in place of some of the wheat flour?
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 4:06 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, exactly. It works great in our Magic chocolate cake recipe, too. I like the brown rice flour the best. Some brown rice flours are more coarsely ground than others...the finer the better...same for the white rice flour. I actually like it a little gritty for coating salmon cakes or vegetables..crispier finished product. Rice flour has a lot less glutamate than wheat flour and the brown variety has more B nutrients and bran.
EmilyS
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Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 9:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Great, thank you! I'll have to check to see if my wheat grinder will grind brown rice (I know I can grind white rice with it). I've been reading that spelt is easier on our bodies than wheat, but I wish I knew how much glutamate is in each kind of grain. . .

I've recently been having msg reactions to the food I'm eating and I'm trying to figure out where the problem is and see what I can do to lower the amount of glutamate in my diet.

Thank you!
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 10:27 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Be aware that citric acid, added to so many canned and bottled items now, contains glutamate...it's made from hydrolyzed corn..not fruit, in most cases today.
EmilyS
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Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 3:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In the past year I re-added canned green chili's and canned tomatoes (Muir Glen organic) which are my only two sources of citric acid back into my diet after avoiding them for 3 years. I don't use either of them very often but I think the canned green chili's are out for me. I think I may still be able to keep an occasional canned diced tomato in my diet, but I'll have to see.

I've been looking into canning my own chili's and it looks like I can bottle them myself with just boiling water in the jars in a pressure canner. Does anyone else bottle their own tomatoes or chili's? Do you react okay to them?

I use frozen most of the time but would like a few shelf stable items on hand.

All of you are wonderful! It's great to have a place to share ideas.

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