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Is it possible to have a reaction by ...

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Is it possible to have a reaction by "smell"? « Previous Next »

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Anonymous
 
Posted From: 74.239.186.60
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 12:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A few years ago I started having reactions to specific food, and like most of you, I first noticed it at Chinese places. As last year went on, I started having more and more reactions, and then finally one of my favorite places in the world had to be added to my "banned" list:

Zaxby's

I'm not sure why, but Zaxby's is so rough on my now, when it didn't used to be at all, that I almost instantly have a reaction just by smell. If I smell the food, I can already feel "it" coming on, and if I eat it I really feel like crap. It's not just the Zaxby's Sauce either, just a piece of the chicken does it to me.

Anyway, I didn't even know it was possible to have a reaction to MSG just by smelling it. Is that really possible as it seems to be for me?
Lisa Marie
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Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 12:52 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It happens to me. When I smell the really strong odors or fumes around restaurants, it can happen. Or, certain cleaing products will get into my system if I have to breathe them. I think it does happen.
Jennifer
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Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 1:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.ncchem.com/review_mcs.htm

I don't remember if this article was of any help - it's been a while since I read it.

I do recall reading somewhere, though, that olfactory nerves are sensitive to glutamate, and it's feasible that smells can trigger an excitotoxic reaction.

I've gotten "the willies" at restaurants before too upon entering.

Jennifer
Jan
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Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 3:17 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I haven't noticed it with MSG, but strong garlic smell effects me the same as eating it: GERD related esophogeal spasming. Makes sense similar reactions are triggered through inhaling.
Dianne
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Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 4:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My daughter gets a very strong reaction when smelling raw onions, makes her feel sick. Is it the physical or mental? And I remember when I was pregnant many smells would produce instant nausea. Never really understood that.
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 5:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A sulfite sensitivity may trigger the reaction to onions and garlic. Others here have reported reacting to foods rich in processed glutamate via smell.
Melinda
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Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 - 4:49 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In short....yes. I will get nauseaus whenever I smell soy sauce being cooked - if I injest anything soy, I get very ill and so a similar effect happens if I am exposed by way of it being in the air. Biologically/chemically speaking I can't explain it precisely.

I have recently been informed by a digestion specialist doc, who treats many with Celiac disease, that one can be exposed to gluten through smelling it by way of cooking anything with gluten in it. If one has Celiac, they are not to have it in their house at all nor be exposed to it being cooked, say in a restaurant or such.

Makes sense to me that anything our bodies are allergic to or intolerant of can be absorbed by way of the lungs as the properties of the food or substance can be emitted in the air. As is the same with chemical sensitivities - you don't have to have it on or in your body to have a reaction, the molecules are released either directly from the source or from a person who is wearing the chemicals (synthetic scents and such like perfumes, colognes and scented laundry soap for example).
Dianne
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Posted on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 2:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Deb, I never thought about it being connected to a sulfite sensitivity.

Melinda, that's interesting too. My husband gets an instant headache from cologne/perfume.
Debbey
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Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 12:34 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

we pulled the airwick automatic air freshener from work it made me sick..i would get horrible headaches and skin itchies only while i was there. once we pulled it-no more problems
the ingredients are icky
Melinda
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 9:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Glad to hear they were compliant in pulling the air fresheners out of your workplace. Even for a "healthy" person, breathing in synthetic fragrances affects one on a neurological level and can deaden the senses - think why you get "used" to a fragrance and therefore feel you need to up the dose...it is because your senses have been deadened by the chemicals. I wish I could find the scientific data I read about that a while back to share, but it was an eye opener for sure.

These air fresheners are not really freshening the air at all and instead putting out toxins and merely masking the smells they are trying to cover up. I myself have far worse reactions to synthetic fragrances than merely deadening my senses, but especially in public places such as restrooms or the workplace, they should be banned in my opinion....but I suppose that is a topic for a different message board than this one - lol.

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