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Dental anesthetic

Battling the MSG Myth » Other Harmful Substances and Sensitivities (Aspartame, L-Cysteine, preservatives, pesticides, environmental toxins) » Dental anesthetic « Previous Next »

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LisaS
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Posted on Thursday, July 19, 2012 - 3:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My son had an MSG-like reaction to dental anesthetic today, the kind that has epinephrine, probably Xylicaine. Usually he reacts to this with fatigue, and since his adrenals are suppressed that makes sense. But today he had more of the anesthetic...and a very strong reaction.

In doing more research, Xylocaine has sodium metabisulfite...we've always wondered if he is sulfite sensitive. Apparently so.

Two ibuprofen later he is better enough to play on the computer, anyway.
Jennifer
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Posted on Sunday, July 22, 2012 - 12:48 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I also have trouble with anesthetics that have sulfites/epinephrine....pretty much anything with epinephrine has sulfites. I wonder if sulfites are excitotoxic in their own rite? I did discover they mess up one of the enzymes that converts glutamate, but I wonder if there's more to it...

Jennifer
LisaS
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Posted on Monday, July 23, 2012 - 5:15 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jennifer, I have to wonder also--I think you are on to something. He had not had anything with glutamates to eat in quite a while, and while I know all proteins have glutamate in them, this was so fast that it didn't seem like sulfites making the glutamate worse. Usually his reactions come on fairly slowly, over a period of hours and last a while. This (probably because it was injected) was like a switch, and it was quite a bad reaction (his reaction is overwhelm/mood and he couldn't even play his computer games or watch TV, he just lay on the couch and moaned). Then almost 20 minutes to the dot of taking ibuprofen and suddenly he was 70% better.

He's had other reactions in the past when glutamate was made worse by aluminum, and/or low blood sugar, but those don't seem to effect him too much if there are not high levels of free glutamate with them.

I don't have any way to prove it but this "feels" like it was a direct excitotoxic reaction to sodium metabisulfite, epinephrine, or something in them.

Also -- here's an interesting thought. I've been trying to track down why I reacted to a particular wheat beer, and I happen to know a guy that works at the brewery. I've verified that they don't use malt extracts nor carrageenan. I've had other beers with no reaction. The wikipedia page for sodium metabisulfite says, "It is commonly used in homebrewing and winemaking to sanitize equipment." It's a possibility, at least.
Nana
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Posted on Monday, July 23, 2012 - 5:43 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

LisaS, how did you determine that low blood sugar causes glutamate reactions to be worse and what do you do to help counteract this? Recently I've thought that my blood sugar has something to do with my food intolerances & msg reactions.
LisaS
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Posted on Thursday, July 26, 2012 - 5:05 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't remember how I figured it out but it is supported by research: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/230/4726/681.abstract
Here's a Blaylock article that talks about it, about halfway down:
http://www.aspartamekills.com/blayart1.htm

Honestly, mostly what we do is not eat glutamates and then not have to worry so much about blood sugar. But there are times I've gone completely off of "white" foods, and until you get rid of reactions that's not a bad approach. Unfortunately, our son also deals poorly with too much protein, particularly animal protein, as he has a genetic variant called CBS that can cause ammonia to be generated. I suspect that this gene is common in those with glutamate intolerance. Here's a link and a quote from the link (if it doesn't go to CBS, click on it after the picture):

Copied from: Return to Autism Page - <http://www.heartfixer.com/amri-nutrigenomics.htm#cbs: >
"The 10-fold up regulation in CBS generates sulfur breakdown products (sulfite and sulfate, which stimulate the stress/cortisol “fight or flight” response), excess ammonia (in the process wasting BH4 which is used up detoxifying ammonia), hydrogen sulfide (producing “brain fog”), and alpha-keto glutarate (leading to “excitotoxicity”).  The G6PDH enzyme system may be affected, leading to abnormalities in sugar control.  Methylation intermediates will “fall through this drain”, so the entire system suffers; our defenses against viral invasion and toxicity suffer.  Co-Q10 and Carnitine generation will fall off due to impaired methylation, and ATP levels fall, robbing you of energy. "

So, as far as prevention, we find that a whole foods, high-good-fat diet works well for us. Whole dairy, coconut oil, butter, and olive oil are what I have come to believe are the most healthy, with canola, soy, and sunflower oil being too high in "PUFA" (polyunsaturates) and causing loss of energy. I attempt to eat a lot of vegetables and fruit, moderate meat (ideally grass-fed and free-range, whole-fat chicken, organic to avoid arsenic which exacerbates excitotoxicity), some eggs (though a friend pointed out that eggs can drop blood sugar as the protein is so easy to digest, so eat with some carbs), oats, quinoa, potatoes, etc. I do eat wheat but am trying to keep it low. My son eats a lot of wheat and dairy, a little meat, some fruit, and does fine on it, but he gets so little glutamate, and takes many supplements, so can also handle quite a lot of sugar without it bothering him. (He's a teen).
Nana
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Posted on Friday, July 27, 2012 - 5:25 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the info, Lisa. Your son is fortunate to have a mom like you.....and a gold metal to all the moms here who work so hard for the benefit of their children. That includes Deb A. too.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Saturday, July 28, 2012 - 9:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i agree with nana... the amount of care that you guys put into taking care of your children and their diets is mind blowing and so unspeakably touching
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Saturday, July 28, 2012 - 9:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

LisaS, wouldn't it be fantastic if alcohol came with nutrition facts? :-) I haven't been drinking much lately, but I'd like to find some organic brands that are honest with their labeling (even though they aren't required to disclose their ingredients). I've always wondered with they are allowed to slip through the cracks without disclosing any information!
ali
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Posted on Saturday, July 28, 2012 - 11:48 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That is so true Ada. Im not a big drinker. But only this weekend while enjoying a drink in the sunshine with friends, i of course started to look for the nutrition and ingredients label to find out quite what i was drinking and the likelihood of msg, not to mention the calorie and sugar content. I was quite dismayed after checking all the different bottles and cans that none offered this information (my friends know me well and pass no remark at my "obsessive" label reading!! :-) ) But seriously, why are they exempt from having to display this information?
LisaS
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Posted on Wednesday, August 01, 2012 - 10:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the kudos, ladies. Now I just need to put the same energy into managing my own health. Sigh. Any tips?

So I tried to do an alcohol "test". Before I became sensitive to glutamate I was becoming sensitive to alcohol. The feeling I got from it actually changed. But I was thinking that was just the beginnings of my glutamate sensitivity. It's a strange feeling, I can't really describe it..somewhat hangover like even from a little, and comes back the next day.

So I went to the liquor store and asked them about vodka. What I learned is that most vodka is made from wheat and grains now. Who knew? Also, almost all is high heat processed. So I found three kinds to try. One is an all-potato vodka, one claims the least amount of contaminants of all the brands, and other is freeze-distilled instead of heat-distilled.

So I drank about an ounce of the potato one. I did not get a headache (my glutamate reaction) so I think the glutamate content was negligible. But I got my "alcohol toxicity" reaction -- slightly nauseous, heavy headed feeling -- within a 1/2 hour and the next day felt awful. If I feel like it some day I'll try the blue "fewest contaminants" one, but at this point I really don't have much desire to even try it.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Wednesday, August 01, 2012 - 5:59 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe we should look into organic vodka? I wonder if it would be safer.
Jennifer
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Posted on Thursday, August 02, 2012 - 10:20 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I seem to do OK with dark stout microbrews. It was explained to me that with stouts, they roast the barley rather than malting it. Though it probably has malted barley, just not as much compared to lighter beers.

I have done OK with Grey Goose vodka. Once I had quite a reaction to a Russian potato vodka, and have not tried potato vodka since.

Rather small amounts of alcohol can screw me up if I don't eat or otherwise have low blood sugar.

Jennifer
ali
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Posted on Friday, August 03, 2012 - 2:31 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thats interesting that you do okay with stouts Jennifer. Im here in Ireland and the only "beer" i can tolerate is guiness which of course is a stout. I didnt initially like it but ive learned to love it when i have the occasional tipple :-)
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, August 07, 2012 - 10:19 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since our blood brain barrier has been compromised or destroyed by excessive intake of glutamate and/or aspartame over the years, any drug or stimulant will enter the brain quickly...so take care!
ali
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Posted on Thursday, August 09, 2012 - 8:17 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the heads up Deb. Im a "light" drinker at best....:-)
Debbey
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Posted on Thursday, August 09, 2012 - 10:01 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

FRIS imported vodka Denmark
freeze distilled seems ok
Tom Fernstrom
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Posted on Saturday, August 11, 2012 - 8:44 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All,

I get a headache if I drink Budweiser beer. I was told because it is made with rice instead of wheat.

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