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Is margarine made from Safflower Oil ...

Battling the MSG Myth » Archive » Brand Names of Food Products You Have Found Safe » Is margarine made from Safflower Oil safe? « Previous Next »

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Frank
Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2001 - 6:54 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Have anyone tried margarine made from Safflower oil? I just saw it at my local health store. I haven't had any butter, neither any margarine in months and I wanted to try something, so if anyone tried this before please let me know.
Also, if anyone knows any good substitute for butter or margarine, please let me know.
Deb A.
Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2001 - 7:38 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I used to love butter on all my cooked vegetables. And I still may use it now and then. I don't mind broccoli plain with a little salt, but I have a difficult time eating cauliflower and a few other things plain. So now I slice up my cauliflower in 1/4 inch thick chunks, and in a pan, I put olive oil, a little fresh lemon juice, a sprinkle of mustard seeds or dry mustard, garlic powder, salt and pepper and then add the vegetable. It sautes into a very tasty and moist side dish that we love. You could do that with most anything. I make most of my cakes with oil instead of butter, and beat mashed potatoes with organic whole milk or rice milk, garlic powder, and a pinch of sugar...an old Idaho recipe. Frank, what are some of the other ingredients on the saffola margarine label?
Carol H
Posted on Wednesday, January 24, 2001 - 2:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Being allergic to soy and dairy, I have found only one margarine that has neither. I'd look real careful at that safflower margarine label, Frank.
M-Y
Posted on Wednesday, January 24, 2001 - 3:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Why would anyone use Margarine? My doctor says that partially hydrogenated or hydrogenated oils
clog artieries. The number one thing to be avoided in the diet.
Carol H
Posted on Thursday, January 25, 2001 - 1:38 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When I cook, I usually just use plain corn oil, or any other type of oil. Margarine for cooking is unnecessary. I even use liquid oils for baking bread in my bread machine instead of butter, it works fine. Sometimes, though I just miss a spreadable substitute for butter, which I can't have.
D M T
Posted on Sunday, April 08, 2001 - 9:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Have you tried "squished" beans?

I soak dry beans in warm water overnight, drain the beans and add fresh water to cook them in. They cook faster and don't seem to be as "gassy."
I whiz them in the blender with a herbs. Yum!

My kids love them as a spread or dip. I've even thinned them down and used them as gravy or sauce for vegies.
Deb A.
Posted on Monday, April 09, 2001 - 2:18 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've added a pureed avocado and Mexican spices to "squished" beans for a dip.
Carol H
Posted on Monday, April 09, 2001 - 2:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unfortunately, I am allergic to beans as well as milk, soy, peanuts, wheat, peppers, tomatoes, apples, carrots, celery, chicken, and artichokes. I think I miss hummus most of all, and a great big chunk of semolina bread to dip in it :(
Deb A.
Posted on Monday, April 09, 2001 - 5:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Carol, It's hard enough to avoid MSG without having food allergies, too! So sorry. I've read somewhere that after avoiding an allergen for awhile, you can reintroduce it to your diet. ????
Have you noticed a drastic difference since you are avoiding these things now?
Ruth
Posted on Friday, April 13, 2001 - 5:25 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My sister-in-law is allergic to wheat. Would spelt be a safe alternative? Does anyone know if it is at all related to wheat? I am so happy I discovered spelt, thanks to this discussion board.
I am sensitive to everything they put in wheat flour, but I don't think I'm bothered by the wheat itself. The white spelt flour is really delicious and would make a great substitute for wheat flour if it is safe.
Carol H
Posted on Friday, April 13, 2001 - 7:16 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ruth, spelt is related to wheat. Also be careful of bulgar, durum, graham, malt, modified food starch, semolina, vegetable gum, vegetable starch, gravy made with flour, and soy sauce. Be aware that if she is allergic to gluten, your sister-in-law would have to avoid rye, oats, barley and tritical as well. Buckwheat, brown rice, millet, and Amaranth are actually safe. The best reference I have found for cooking without wheat is the Allergy Self-Help Cookbook by Marjorie Hurt-Jones, R.N. There is also a bakery near me that makes wheat free/gluten free baked goods. There may be one available near your sister-in-law too.
Ruth
Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2001 - 8:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Carol, I'll send this right along to my sister-in-law.
Carol H
Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2001 - 2:40 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ruth, 100% corn starch is OK for wheat sensitive people. Whole foods carries wheat free/gluten free breads in the frozen section. I found some today.

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