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Low Thyroid

Battling the MSG Myth » Archive » Help! I Have a Question » Low Thyroid « Previous Next »

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Deb S
Posted on Friday, January 19, 2001 - 1:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First, I don't know whether I have a low thyroid or not; blood tests were always normal. But I've always felt I had a sluggish metabolism, and I have several (but not all) of the listed symptoms for hypothyroidism. I've been reading that the TSH (?) test isn't all that reliable of an indicator for low thyroid output.

I know that several people on this board take thyroid replacement - including Deb A. - and I want to ask this question: Do you or have you ever tested low for iron? I have been turned away the last 3 times I tried to donate blood, because it reads under 12.5, the minimum they require. Mine was 11.7 the last 2 times. It's not considered anemic, but just low for donating blood. I have never had a problem with iron and have donated blood 5 times in the past 2 years.

It could be the lack of processed, fortified and enriched foods in my diet. Or it could be part of a whole autoimmune, chemical sensitivity, low thyroid??? syndrome. Any thoughts?
Connie
Posted on Friday, January 19, 2001 - 5:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb S.,

My MSG sensitivity lead me to a holistic MD who began treating me for hypothyroidism in October. She did this based on my basal body temperature results (95-96 degrees). Broda Barnes, MD, describes the research he's done to substantiate this as a significant test in his book - Hypothyroidism: The Unsuspected Illness.

My regular internist wouldn't even give me a thyroid blood test, saying they almost always come out in the normal range. He was right, it is, but if your body temperature is low, you need to find a doctor who is willing to trust your basal body temperature. This is taken upon awakening in the AM, under the arm, for several days. Anything under 97.8 is considered hypothyroid.

My temperature is slowly coming up to about 96.5-97.0, and I understand the process can take a year. My doctor started me out with 30mg and increases the dosage by 15mg every 6 weeks, so I'm up to 60mg now.

You'll find excellent info on hypothroidism on -
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hypothyroidism/index.htm
I did a search for anemia there and found this link - http://thyroid.about.com/library/weekly/aa010900a.htm?terms=anemi

Also, I go to a compounding pharmacy where they put my medicines in gelcaps, then I can open them and take the med. with applesauce.

I've had hair analysis done by a naturopath and found I was low in many minerals besides iron: Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium, Potasium, Copper, and Manganese. I tried a few supplements, but its so hard to find ones I don't react to. My naturopath seems to feel that when my thyroid level is correct I'll be less reactive, plus, I'll absorb the minerals found in my food better because she also treated me for Candidas (yeast)...we'll see...

Good luck, and keep following your heart in your quest for health. I think that our MSG sensitivity is just the tip of the iceberg for many of us.
Deb A.
Posted on Friday, January 19, 2001 - 6:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Connie, how does your doctor know that your dosage should be increased or not every 6 weeks? Is this also determined by the basal temperature test? Is a blood test ever involved?
Deb S.,
I have yet to test low for iron. I am doing basically what Connie is doing, regarding natural thyroid from a compound pharmacist, but mine is mixed with a little cane sugar. I open it onto a spoon, lick it off and follow that by water. My doctor is a traditional doctor and will give me a blood test in a week to check my hormone level. But the test only covers one of the TS levels and according to what I've learned, thanks to Connie, it's good to get both T3 and T4 levels checked. Of course, if they are inaccurate, as she said, and as some doctors believe, it may be waste of time. The natural swine hormone provides both T3 and T4. Synthroid and others like it provide just one.
You should be tested one way or the other or do what I did. I printed up the info from the site that Connie suggested, about Synthroid's questionable reputation, along with the statement that the blood tests are often inaccurate and gave the info to my doctor. He had no problem working with a compound pharmacist, as long as I could find one for him. You would be amazed at the number of people who are MSG sensitive who are also hypothyroid. Dr. Olney says that the hypothalamus region of the brain is the area most effected by MSG, and it controls the thyroid gland.
Deb S
Posted on Friday, January 19, 2001 - 7:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Connie and Deb A.,
Thanks so much for the information and links. I am looking for a new doctor, and hopefully will find one that either is already aware of this, or at least is willing to read and give it a try. I printed this page and some of the information from the above links to take with me.
Connie
Posted on Saturday, January 20, 2001 - 3:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb A.,

When the holistic MD tested my blood, my TSH, T4 and T3 were all in the normal range. Luckily she recognized that an average body temperature of 96 degrees was not. She hasn't taken another blood test since then, since what's present in your blood isn't always what's going on in your cells.
But she is very cautious about raising the level very slowly. She continues to use my temperature to measure what I need.
Deb A.
Posted on Sunday, January 21, 2001 - 9:55 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Connie, I'd like to start taking my basal temp. How many minutes do you keep the thermometor under the arm? I will record this for a week and give the results to my doctor. I really appreciate all your help.
Connie
Posted on Sunday, January 21, 2001 - 10:18 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb A,

I was specifically instructed to buy a basal thermometer (because it has marks to measure to the nearest .1 degree) and to keep it under my arm for 10 minutes. It should be on your nightstand and already shaken down. The idea is to limit your movement prior to taking it.

I tried 3 pharmacies, and finally found a basal one, but it only went down to 96 degrees. So I ended up using an electronic one, which I found was accurate to .1-.2 degree when compared to a traditional mouth themometer.

You'll find that your temperature is slighly lower taken in this method, but it's the preferred way. I understand that when taken orally it is more subject to increased temps due to infection/illness. Because temperatures fluctuate with the menses, it shouldn't be taken at that time of the month.

Wishing you good luck and good health!
Deb A.
Posted on Monday, January 22, 2001 - 9:41 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Connie! I tried it this morning and my basal temp was 97.2.... I am taking 90 mcg of the thyroid right now. Would that temp indicate I needed more if it stays that temp for a week?Whenever I have had my temp taken at the doctor's, it's always been low. Now it makes sense why.
Connie
Posted on Monday, January 22, 2001 - 2:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

According to Dr. Broda Barnes' book, any temperature (taken under the arm) under 97.8 is considered an indication of being hypothyroid. You need to see if it's below that consistently.

I believe that my MD will continue to increase my dosage, in small increments, until I get there. Remember that it takes your body about 6 weeks to adjust to each new dosage.
Deb A.
Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2001 - 9:31 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks again, Connie. I will have more ammo to give my doctor after a week of taking my temp, thanks to you! Hope you have a wonderful day!
Deb S
Posted on Saturday, February 10, 2001 - 5:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Another possible explanation for low thyroid output: fluoride. Even if you don't drink fluoridated water, you may be getting large amounts in green and black teas. Very interesting article at:

http://www.bruha.com/fluoride/html/green_tea___f.html

Doctors used to prescribe fluoride to treat hyperthyroid conditions! The article also says that there is aluminum in teas, and that the fluoride binds with it to make it more absorbable by the body and brain. Most people have heard of the aluminum-Alzheimer's connection. Yikes!!!
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Saturday, February 10, 2001 - 7:19 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The charcoal filters that go on faucets are said to not only remove the chlorine, with it's chemical taste, but to take the fluoride out of the water as well (which they don't advertise).
Carol H
Posted on Saturday, February 10, 2001 - 9:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fluoride is also a component of teflon. If you use a teflon pan, you may be increasing your ingestion of fluoride.
Deb S
Posted on Sunday, February 11, 2001 - 8:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since I do not own any "Teflon" anymore, I wondered if I was safe. I do have several nonstick pans that I use all the time, but they're different brands (Silverstone, T-Fal, Mirro, etc.). After brief searching, it would appear that ALL nonstick coatings are some type of fluoropolymer. Darn.
MEMorrisNJ
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 5:31 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting site re thyroid: http://thyroid.about.com/health/thyroid/mbody.htm
MEMorrisNJ
Posted on Friday, June 01, 2001 - 7:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Synthroid's safety and efficacy is being questioned by the FDA and may be going off the market in August according to an article in the Wall Street Journal today.
The NoMSGers who are taking it may need to be aware that they may swing between hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism every time a new prescription is filled. They attribute this to the fact that Syntroid has stability, potency and consistency problems.
(It makes me wonder if many of our vitamins can have have stability, potency and consistency problems too.)
Ruth
Posted on Friday, June 01, 2001 - 2:28 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My thyroid doctor refused to consider giving me anything else when I asked him a couple of years ago. He wouldn't even discuss it. His reason was that Synthroid was the only medicine that was stable. How quickly things change. MSG?
Deb A.
Posted on Saturday, June 02, 2001 - 8:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Am I mistaken? Wasn't there a link to a news article about Synthroid posted here a few days ago. I can't find it now. ????
Ruth
Posted on Saturday, June 02, 2001 - 11:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I never saw an article here about Synthroid. I woke up to it on the radio the other day but was unable to find anything on the web.
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Saturday, June 02, 2001 - 7:54 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

With Mad Cow disease a threat, it would make sense to favor safer products like Synthroid:

http://www.mall-net.com/mcs/madcow.html
MEMorrisNJ
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2001 - 6:40 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I saw an Associated Press (AP) article similar to the Wall Street Journal in one in my local paper yesterday. Perhaps, you can find the same AP article in your own local papers.
Ruth
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2001 - 8:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just found the article about Synthroid at www.msnbc.com. Look under Health.
MEMorrisNJ
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2001 - 2:32 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And here is Abbott Labs' reply

http://abbott.com/news/press_release.cfm?id=260

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