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Breakfeast foods

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clarissa
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 5:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

what can ieat for breakfeast besides bananas oatmeal cold cereal eggs crackers and p-butter clarissa
Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 6:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here are some ideas but I'd like to hear more too:

1. Nuts (e.g, organically grown almonds) ground up and placed over fruit
2. A grain (e.g., quinoia, buckwheat, millet) ground up into a flour and then mixed with egg and a little water to create a pancake consistency and cooked over the stove.
3. Just a plain grain cooked with water. (Be careful not to overcook so that you don't release the free glutamates.)
4. Left overs from the previous day's lunch or dinner
Deb A.
Posted on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 11:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can you handle farina?...not the boxed cream of wheat which has additives. I buy it bulk at health food stores. You can buy it as whole wheat farina, too. I boil it up just until thick enough to eat, ( I like it rather runny, since I like it plain with honey or sugar stirred in it...no milk, although that's good). I make it thicker sometimes, and then pour it into a buttered bread pan, and chill overnight( like people do with cornmeal). Then you slice it, since it's firm, and fry in oil or organic butter, and eat with syrup or honey. (homemade)It's good with eggs, and so are fried potatoes. I also fry leftover rice with some chopped onion and eat with eggs.
I make bread, and eat toast with grapefruit or oranges a lot. I bought a juicer, and now buy 15 lbs. of organic carrots, apples, and lemons to juice all at once and freeze in quart jars. Any fruit can be juiced this way, but I like that
combo. I make pancakes (several recipes in the book), and French toast, using water or rice milk . Try making waffles, biscuits, and muffins in large batches and freezing them individually. Waffles are great substitutes for bread, too. Almond butter and homemade jam are great on them and on pancakes. Some people eat leftovers for breakfast, but I enjoy those for lunch. Kavli rye crackers are safe, also.
I always boil a dozen eggs for the week to have on hand for quick eating. Or chop up and add oil and fresh lemon juice, sugar, salt, and dry mustard for egg salad sandwiches or topping for crackers. I also cook up 6 or 7 cups of white or brown rice each week. I freeze some for meals, and keep the rest in the fridge to eat for breakfast. One way I enjoy rice, is to add some water to make it moist, heat it, and just add sugar or cinnamon sugar. I will occasionally add a tiny amount of organic whole milk or rice milk, but I love it without, too. Be sure to rinse white rice a few times, since the vitamin carrier is cornstarch. I also eat Zoom and Red river cooked cereals. I bottle lots of fruit, and there's nothing better some days than peaches with some whole wheat toast or cinnamon bread...homemade. A breadmaker is a great asset. I make several loaves in my Bosch mixer and freeze. Hope this helps.
Carol H
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2001 - 2:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb A, I'm printing out your post and sticking it on the fridge! :)

A friend gave me a recipe variation on french toast. Take a large brioche loaf (Whole foods sells them if you don't want to make them). Slice in thick slices and layer them in a buttered large casserole dish. In a separate container, stir together 1. rice milk, or organic whole milk, 2. eggs (raw scrambled), 3. vanilla. Pour mixture right over the bread until the bread is soaked. Sprinkle with cinnamon and brown sugar (if you can tolerate it and are not too hypoglycemic.) You can add more safe butter pats on top if you like. Bake in the oven until cooked through. Cut in squares and serve with fruit juice sweetened toppings, or your favorite pancake topping. It tastes like french toast without as much work, and the kitchen doesn't fill up with smoke, just a nice cinnamon baking smell. I cut up the rest into squares and freeze. My boyfriend loves this so much, he's requested it as Sunday breakfast from now on...
Deb A.
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2001 - 6:38 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yum! Thanks Carol....it's so great to get more breakfast ideas, and that sounds like a great one. Here's another I just started making. I buy safe lean ground pork from a butcher (no phosphates, hormones, etc.) I mix in sage(about 1/4 t. or more per lb.pork, salt, pepper, and a little honey or maple syrup..2 t. is plenty. I also like to add a little cayenne(a dash) and 1/4 t. of marjoram or thyme. Anyway, it makes delicious pork sausage breakfast patties. I've even fried it up with green peppers, and onions, and layered that over buttered sliced bread in a casserole pan, and poured a mixture of beaten eggs and rice milk and salt, pepper,...over the bread and baked until set. Really good eating for breakfast or anytime. I will definitely try the french toast casserole, Carol. I am having a ton of company over next weekend, and that would be a great breakfast idea. ..no standing over the hot stove frying up french toast all morning! Thanks again!
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 5:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Deb A
I just received the Battling the MSG Myth cookbook. I'm assuming it's your creation? Are you the Debby Anglesey who wrote the book? If you are, "Congratulations on doing such a good job". I can only imagine how much work went into this. I'm a Computer Instructor and when I started off, there weren't many instructor / student guides available, so I had to write them myself. It takes a lot of time and energy. You have done an excellent job!
It was also my first purchase on e-commerce, but everything went quite well. I received the book in less than 2 weeks, and I live in Canada, so it had to go through customs.
I do have a question for you though; is it possible to make a Rice bread using baking powder (no yeast) in a Breadmaker. The Breadmaker is a Mother's Day gift, so I haven't used it yet. Maybe someone out there who is Gluten, yeast & MSG intolerant may be able to give me some advice on this.
Deb A.
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 6:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Pam,
I've never used a breadmaker, and the only bread I have made without yeast is the one in the book (yeastless bread) and I have made that with wheat flour. Kneading is used to develop the gluten, so that the gas from the growing yeast can be caught in the pockets of gluten protein. It's my guess that you could use the bread machine to develop any gluten (which isn't much in rice flour) that may be present in the flours you use, but too much kneading may cause the baking powder's effects to be diminished. I only say this, because I have read recipes for breads calling for baking powder (in gluten free books) and many suggest mixing the baking powder or soda with a little liquid and then quickly adding that to the batter just before baking it. But to try and get a texture more like bread, it may be worth a try to see what happens with your recipe in the machine. If it is flat, knead the flours first, and try adding the baking powder with a little water at the last. Please be careful about any dough conditioners you may be adding to your wheatless flours. They often contain glutamate. There are others who post here who are gluten intolerant, and I'm hoping they will respond to your inquiry.
I'm so glad that you are enjoying the book and that you can appreciate the work that went into it. When I began it, I had no idea of the hours it would take to revise, revise, correct, correct. (it took 1 1/2 years to complete!). I still keep tweaking it from time to time!
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 8:32 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Deb
The reason I'm using the breadmachine, is because of degenerative Disk disease and Fibromylgia etc. I have too much pain to do it by hand these days, so I'm thinking the machine can be a huge help to me.
The breads I have made in the past have been mixes which contain Rice flour, cornstarch and/or potato flour along with Xanthan gum or Guar gum.
I could never eat more than a slice or 2 before sensing something wasn't quite right. I would get a reaction.
After reading about MSG, I have a feeling it could be something in the mix.
Today I will try it with just Rice & bean flour, guar gum and baking powder with a little salt and olive oil.
These breads are usually dense and heavy, like a cake, but it's better than nothing.
I'll try it in the breadmachine on cake mode, then I'll do one in another mode (there are a bunch of settings to experiment with).
I'll keep you posted on how it turns out.

About your book; To the writer, your book is like a work in progress, it's never finished, but to your readers, it's perfect.
I used to paint as well (may go back to that someday). I never wanted to say it was finished because I could always find a flaw, but to the buyers, they couldn't wait to own it!

Pam
Pam M.
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 9:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just found a site for Gluten Free Bread Machine Baking for those of you who are cursed by more than one affliction.
http://www.sonic.net/webpub/bread-machine/gluten_free.html
Still haven't found one without yeast, but I'll keep looking.
Anonymous
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 11:39 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Be careful with heavy flours in a bread machine. It's probably not good for the motor. I tried it once and was not successful. Just stay around so you can keep tabs on what's going on inside the machine.
Carol H
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 4:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pam, I was just diagnosed with wheat allergy. I am not allergic to yeast so I have been trying different things in my bread machine - all disappointing. My nutritionist recommended Foods By George in Mahwah NJ (201) 612-9700. I have the order form, but I haven't ordered from them yet. They make blueberry muffins, corn muffins, brownies, pound cake, crumb cake, chocolate chip cookies, pecan cookies, cinnamon currant cookies, pecan tarts that are yeast, wheat, and gluten free. For those who can tolerate yeast, they make wheat/gluten free pizza crust and english muffins using a rice, tapioca, potato flour base. The ingredients are all listed on the brochure. They look very simple.
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2001 - 5:10 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds good Carol, I'll have to check it out.
By the way,I spent all afternoon pouring over recipes for different breads, put together one that was yeast free and gluten free and set it all up in my brand new Bread Machine and guess what?... Just after it started to bake, the machine display came up with an error. I looked in the manual and it said to call the 1-800 #! I reset the machine only to have another error occur and I had to unplug it!
I couldn't believe it! Everything was going sooooo well and wammo, my big experminent was over before it got started.
I took the half baked loaf out and put it in the oven. I guess the next step will be the garbage can.
I'll return the machine tomorrow.
Oh well, it's a good thing I have a sense of humor.

Pam
Deb A.
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2001 - 8:13 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Pam. Thanks again for the very encouraging words about the book. Sorry about the bread experiment. You might try the yeastless recipe in the book using rice flour. It does not need any kneading. I have had better luck with brown rice flour, for some reason, than white rice flour. You could add some potato flour (or mashed potatoes...not the big Idaho ones..they are treated with AuxiGro most of the time) to the recipe, or any flours you like. Please keep us posted and ood luck. You're sure right about how we look at our "creations", Pam. Thanks.
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2001 - 5:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just bought another BreadMaker, a "West Bend" with two beaters in the bottom.
I will be trying it out tomorrow.
I'll keep you posted on the results.

Pam
Ruth
Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2001 - 9:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pam,
I went through 6 or 7 bread machines before I found one that was any good. I found it at a department store. It is a Breadman Plus,
TR 800. I tried everything that Target, Walmart, and Service Merchandise had. None of them were useable for one reason or another. With this one, the pan screws in-with a slight turn. I had one machine where the pan bounced itself right out of the base, just stirring up the flour, and it is a light, white bread. Had various problems with all the others. This Breadman was on sale-can't remember exactly how much I paid, but it was well under $100. I use my bread machine constantly to make bread with organic white spelt flour ( the only thing I can find without additives-it's available in bulk at my Whole Foods), and sweet rolls. I use the bread for French toast, a staple for me because of the protein in the eggs (I throw away most of the yolk though). Wheat and gluten don't bother me, but I think the additives in most flours do. If your new Westbend doesn't work, maybe you could give the Breadman Plus TR 800 a try.
Laurie M
Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2001 - 8:31 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ruth,
Why do you throw away most of the yolk? If you are using free range brown eggs there shouldn't be a problem with the yolk. The nutrients in the yolk are really good for you. With the diet most of us follow you really shouldn't have to worry about cholesterol.
Ruth
Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2001 - 2:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Laurie M.,
I use regular eggs from the grocery store, and I have been tossing most of the yolk for quite a while because of cholesterol. I eat a lot of eggs and beef, and no fish or chicken any more. Can't find a safe source. I've never tried free range brown eggs, but maybe I will. Are the yolks different?
Thanks.
Laurie M
Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2001 - 7:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ruth,
I think free range eggs taste better and,having worked on a chicken farm, i know they get better food. I get headaches from regular grocery store eggs but not free range. Free range eggs are also much higher in omega 3 fatty acids which are supposed to be really good for you. It is found in ocean fish too. If you are not getting any fish it might be a good idea to try the eggs.
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Friday, May 18, 2001 - 5:39 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well everyone, I admit defeat!!!
The The West Bend Breadmaker I tried out today didn't have a Quick Bread or Cake setting, eventhough the manual said it did.
By this time, I had my batter made, and put in in the pan.
I went to press the correct mode and WALLAH!! No Quick Bread Mode!
I went back to the book, and sure enough their was the QB recipe. When I looked closer, it said some models didn't come with a QB mode.
I'm taking this thing back and buying a mixer (a tough one)!
I'll have the price of a breadmaker spent in gas just returning the machines!!
My cake/bread is now baking nicely in the oven. I had the fore-thought to turn my oven on this time before I started the bread.
Can't fool me twice, three times maybe, but not twice! ;-)

I went out today to check out the KitchenAid Mixers. Both places had them priced at $380.00 not including tax. Sears also carries them but much more expensive and larger.( I live in Canada).
It was too much for my pocket book, so I went for the "West Bend" mixer at Sears.
It's supposed to be heavy duty and has two extra coil type beaters for "dough mixing". The bowl is 4 qts. and comes with a smaller bowl as well. Cost $89.oo before tax.
It looks like it can handle the rice flour, but time will tell.
I hope all this trial and error stuff is helpful to some of you who have just found this discussion group and are new to the "Diet". I don't want to clutter the "air waves" so to speak.
After I try out the machine, and everything goes well, I'll put this topic to rest.
Thanks to all of you who gave me tips on the breadmakers/mixers.
I think we have all come to the conclusion that if all one needs is a cake cycle and can't use MSG, yeast, milk nor gluten, one is just as well off using a mixer that can handle the dough and then bake it in the oven.

Tks
Pam
Carol H
Posted on Friday, May 18, 2001 - 3:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pam, when I want to give up, I just toast myself two wheat-free, gluten-free, waffles, and eat them with two eggs over easy on top. I try to pretend its bread under there. It sort of works (sigh). This week in my bread machine I made a yeast bread with a special mix. I reacted to it. The guar gum in the mix is related to the legume family. Please be aware that if any of you have soy allergy, you may react to guar gum like I do. This is going to be a long hungry summer. You definitely have my profound sympathy, Pam.
Deb A.
Posted on Friday, May 18, 2001 - 4:46 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Guar gum contains glutamate according to NoMSG.I don't know what it is produced from...it may be hydrolyzed, fermented or cured????
Carol H
Posted on Saturday, May 19, 2001 - 6:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb, Guar gum is made from a member of the bean family by the following process http://www.food.us.rhodia.com/brochures/hydrcllds/Page6.asp. Being in the legume family it already is probably high in protein. During its processing it is heated which may be where the trouble is. Locust bean gum which is related to carob and guar is hydrated during processing. If heat is involved I'm betting hydrolysis is too. xanthan gum is not related to either of these gums, but it is actually ground up lab microorganisms (how disgusting is that!) Lesson for today - avoid gums as thickeners.
Deb A.
Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2001 - 4:32 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the facts, Carol, and good advice!!!!!
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2001 - 9:55 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi everyone
I've been away from this forum for a week or so because I'm having medical testing done.
In the meantime, I've experimented with bread and I've come up with a recipe that works for me. I thought I would be nice and share it with others.
It's a mix and match from others and some original stuff from me.
Hope it helps those of you who are intolerant to more than one thing.

WHEAT FREE, YEAST FREE BREAD

DRY INGREDIENTS

2 Cups “Bob’s Red Mill Stone Ground White Rice Flour”
½ cup Tapioca Flour
¼ cup Potato Starch
6 tsp. Corn free & gluten free baking powder
1 tsp. Salt
2 tsp. Xanthan Gum Powder
2 tbsp. Sugar

WET INGREDIENTS

2 tsp. Apple Cider vinegar
1 oz. Extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 cups warm water

Mix WET ingredients together in an electric mixer bowl
Mix DRY ingredients together in separate bowl

Insert Dough beaters in the mixer, turn mixer on and select medium speed.
Gradually add the DRY ingredients to the WET slowing the speed of the mixer down to Stir or Fold after 5 minutes then continue stirring or folding for 10 –15 minutes.
Bake for approx. 60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean at 350 degrees F.
Makes 1 small loaf.

You may need to experiment with this recipe till it fits your diet.
I am Gluten, milk, egg, yeast and MSG, preservative intolerant.
So far, I can eat this bread without any repercussions.
I use a mixer because I have Myofascial Pain Syndrome. You may want to mix this recipe by hand, but I can’t vouch for the results.

Pam Maddigan
Paul
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2001 - 7:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am gluten intolerant as well and found an excellent brown rice bread in my local health food store. They also make a very good brown rice soda bread. I was quite happy to find a bread that tasted somewhat like regular bread after it is toasted . But I have read that one ingredient in the loaf gelatin is a source of msg.I would appreciate any advice on this or I will have to throw this loaf out and start searching again.Thanks for this site and your help.
Paul
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2001 - 7:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am gluten intolerant as well and found an excellent brown rice bread in my local health food store. They also make a very good brown rice soda bread. I was quite happy to find a bread that tasted somewhat like regular bread after it is toasted . But I have read that one ingredient in the loaf gelatin is a source of msg.I would appreciate any advice on this or I will have to throw this loaf out and start searching again.Thanks for this site and your help.
Deb A.
Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2001 - 6:04 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul, the amount of free glutamate in gelatin varies, but it is always present. If you do all right with the bread after a month of using it, you may be fine with the amount. However, if you get too much free glutamate from other sources, the bread may just be the thing to tip the balance. Trust what your body tells you. Good luck.
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2001 - 10:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul, I am also gluten intolerant. I used to buy the rice breads from the store as well, but found they made me feel sick after just a few slices.
You may want to check the yeast as well as the gelatin. I found I couldn't tolerate having yeast in anything.
Maybe Deb can speak to the subject of yeast and MSG.
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2001 - 7:18 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pam,

It's what's done to the yeast that matters:

http://www.nutrition.cornell.edu/nutriquest/yeast.html
Ruth
Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2001 - 10:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think the yeast in breads is different from autolyzed yeast, though maybe heating the baker's yeast when making bread changes its properties. I do know that some yeast companies have added ingredients recently. I buy only the one that says yeast, and nothing else. Problem is, breads that rise also need gluten.
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2001 - 3:27 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you can't have yeast, there are places that sell breads without it. Here's one:

http://www.pacificbakery.com/
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2001 - 3:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here are a couple gluten free bakeries:

http://www.glutenfree.com/

http://www.glutensolutions.com
Anonymous
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2001 - 10:00 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Don't be like me and assume that a packaged food with organic ingredients or gluten-free ingredients is safe. There may still be other ingredients in it that have MSG in it. In fact, I now keep a paper copy of George Samuels' list with me to refer to and share with others: http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources.html
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2001 - 12:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the links Roy. I will check them out.
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2001 - 12:19 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anonymous
Thanks
I'm very careful when reading the ingredients label. I too carry a list from George Samuels and am a frequent visitor to his site.
Marcia
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 4:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What is George Samuels web address?
Anonymous
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 5:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it Jack Samuels-Truth in Labeling, that you are speaking of?
Deb A.
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 7:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jack and Adrienne Samuel's site is www.truthinlabeling.org. The e mail address is found there, I'm sure.

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