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Index to Battling the MSG Myth

Battling the MSG Myth » How You Made the MSG Connection » Index to Battling the MSG Myth « Previous Next »

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Wilson Callan
Posted on Saturday, February 25, 2006 - 6:19 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

last year i started typing up an index to the book as i read it. well i only go thru page 56 but maybe somebody will find it useful, so i thought i should post it anyway:

BAD INGREDIENTS call (800) 555-1212 for food companies’ toll free numbers
· Accent – MSG. P11
· Adobo – MSG. P42
· Ajinomoto – MSG product. P11. p25
· alcohol – can be made from corn, and have MSG. p27
· alkalies – used to make MSG. P9
· amino acids – some people react. P55
· annatto – can be spiked with MSG. used to color butter and cheese yellow. P22. p25
· Appetize – fat substitute. Can cause reaction. P27
· ascorbic acid (vitamin C) - most is from corn, but may not contain glutamic acid. P31
· aspartame – another amino acid neurotoxin that causes cancer and migraine. P7, 23
· aspartate – another exitotoxin made from vegetable protein. P10, 55
· aspartic acid – amino acid in aspartame. P13, 55
· autolyzed plant protein – MSG. P22
· autolyzed yeast – chemically processed yeast. MSG. P9, 22, 25
· Auxigro – 30% glutamic acid sprayed on Idaho potatoes and other vegetables. P32
· bacteria – used to make MSG. P9
· barley malt – some MSG from enzyme reaction. P9, 22, 25
· beef flavoring – MSG. P9
· bouillon, canned stock (chicken/beef/vegetable)–often contain MSG. long cooking. P26
· broth – foods made with this often contain MSG, due to long cooking. P22
· brown rice syrup – foods (cereal) made with this often contain MSG. P22, 34
· calcium caseinate – hydrolyzed milk protein. MSG. P9, 22
· caffeine – causes migraine for some. P17, 34
· Caprein – fat substitute. Can cause reaction. P27
· carmel flavoring or coloring – from malted barley and hydrolyzed corn. P22, 26
· carrageenan – from seaweed. Often contains MSG or has it added. P9, 22
· citrate – made from corn. Found in supplements. P55
· citric acid – now made from corn. foods made with this often contain MSG. P22, 49
· corn protein – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· corn syrup – less MSG than maltodextrin. Can have sulfites. P9, 28, 50, 55
· corn syrup solids – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· cornstarch – less MSG than maltodextrin. P9, 22, 49, 55
· cysteic acid – another exitotoxin made from vegetable protein. P10
· D-glutamic acid – MSG. P9
· dextrin – from corn? foods made with this often contain MSG. P22, 49
· dextrates – from corn. MSG found in vitamins and mineral supplements. P23, 28, 49
· dextrose – from corn. may contain MSG. P22, 28, 49
· disodium guanylate or inosinate – used to enhance MSG. MSG is usually present. P23
· dough conditioners – some include lecithin, whey protein or L-cysteine. P22, 23, 27
· dried seaweed – MSG. P9
· dry milk solids – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· enriched “anything” – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· enzyme modified “anything” – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· enzymes – if present MSG is usually present. P22
· excipients – in vitamins. P55
· fermented “anything” – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· flavors – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· flavoring – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· flowing agents – added to salt. foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· fructose – made from corn. May contain MSG. p28, 55
· gelatin – always contains MSG, varying amounts. Processed animal by-product. P9, 28
· Glutacyl – MSG. P11
· glutamate – MSG. P11, 55
· glutamic acid – amino acid is natural glutamate, but appears on a label as MSG. P9, 55
· gluten – some people react. P55
· Glutavine – MSG. P11
· Gourmet Powder – MSG. P11
· guar gum – foods made with this often contain MSG. fat substitute. P22. p27
· gums (guar, vegetable) – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· hydrolyzed protein – animal, vegetable (plant) or milk. MSG. fat substitute. P9, 27, 28
· invert sugar – made from corn. May contain MSG. in cereal. p28, 34
· kombu (extract) – dried seaweed. MSG. P9, 28
· L-Cysteine – another amino acid neurotoxin. P7. p23
· L-glutamic acid – natural glutamate in plants and animals. P9
· Lawry’s Seasoning Salt – MSG. P11
· lecithin – MSG if from hydrolyzed soy. foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· lipolyzed butter fat – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· liquid malt (syrup) – form of barley malt that contains MSG. p25
· malt extract or flavoring – some MSG from enzyme reaction. P9. p22
· malt syrup – some may react to this sweetener in cereal. P34
· malted barley (flavor or flour) – contains MSG. P22. p25
· maltodextrin – from corn. High in MSG. fat substitute. P9, 22, 27, 28, 55
· Manitol – created sweetener that can give stomach problems. P55
· Mei-jing – MSG. P11
· milk powder – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· milk solids – contain MSG. p31
· modified food starch – made from soy, potato, whey or corn. Often contain MSG. p27
· mono and di-glyceride – okay from vegetable or animal, not okay from corn. P49
· monopotassium glutamate – MSG. P11
· monosodium glutamate – MSG. P9
· natural beef flavoring – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· natural chicken flavoring – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· natural flavors or flavoring – can be autolyzed yeast or hydrolyzed protein. P28
· natural pork flavoring – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· nitrates – known to cause headaches. P32
· nitrites – known to cause headaches. P32
· oat protein – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· Olestra – fat substitute. Can cause reaction. P27
· pectin – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· phenylalanine – amino acid in aspartame. P13
· phosphates – meat rinse. Also in soaps and detergents. P56
· plant protein isolate – sulfites. P50
· potassium bisulfite – sulfites. P50
· potassium metabisulfite – sulfites. P50
· potassium sulfite – sulfites. P50
· protein fortified “anything” such as “milk” –often is MSG. P22
· protease (enzymes) – if present, MSG is usually present. P22
· reaction flavors – if present, MSG is usually present. P22
· rice protein – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22, 55
· rice syrup – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· seasonings – contain MSG. Sometimes is just a real spice. P7, 22, 29
· smoke flavor or flavorings – most have MSG from hydrolyzed protein. P9, 29
· sodium bisulfite – sulfites. P50
· sodium caseinate – hydrolyzed milk protein. MSG. P9, 22, 29
· sodium metabisulfite – sulfites. P50
· sodium sulfite – sulfites. P50
· Sorbitol – created sweetener that can give stomach problems. P55
· soy extract – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· soy protein (concentrate or isolate) – MSG from processed soy beans. P9, 22, 29, 55
· spice – can mean MSG, especially in meat products. P22, 29
· Spike – MSG. P11
· sprouted corn or wheat – free glutamate is created. P52
· stock – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· Subu – MSG. P11
· sugar cane – used to make MSG. P10
· sulfites – author is allergic to, as well as MSG. don’t have to be on labels. P6, 33
· sulfur dioxide – sulfites. P50
· sulfuric acid – sulfites. P50
· tetra sodium pyrophosphate – guy sick after eating canned clams with this. P21
· textured protein – MSG. P22, 30
· Torula Yeast – MSG. P11. p25
· tyramine – in chocolate. effects some people negatively. P27
· ultra-pasteurized “anything” – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22, 30
· vegetable gum – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· Vestin – MSG. P11
· vitamin enriched “anything” – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22
· Wei-jing – MSG. P11
· wheat – contains natural glutamate. Wheat starch is used to make MSG. P9, 28
· wheat protein – foods made with this often contain MSG. P22, 55
· whey – some free glutamate. also “whey” can mean hydrolyzed milk. P31
· whey protein (concentrate or isolate) – MSG if hydrolyzed milk protein added. P9, 31
· xanthum gum – fat substitute. Can cause reaction. Can be from corn. P27, 49
· yeast extract – chemically processed yeast. MSG. P9. p22. p25
· yeast food – MSG. P22
· yeast nutrient – used as a dough conditioner. MSG. P22. P27
· yeast, instant or special bread – contain nutrient or L-cysteine. P28
· Zest – MSG. P11

FOODS
· Alcohol
o BAD: wine, beer – sulfites. P50
· Applesauce
o GOOD: fat substitute in baking. P33
· Baby formula
o BAD: often has MSG. p23
· Bacon
o BAD: “smoke flavoring” can contain hydrolyzed protein or MSG. p29
· Bagels
o GOOD: if made without liquid malt. P25
· Baked goods (Bread, biscuits and muffins)
o GOOD: made using baking powder, soda or plain yeast. P25, 26
o GOOD: some rye bread and sourdough bread. P39
o BAD: from bakeries – some contain L-cysteine or MSG. P23, 24
o BAD: bread, dough conditioners, bread crumbs – sulfites. P50
· Baking powder
o BAD: can contain cornstarch. P27
· Barbeque sauce
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24
· Beans
o GOOD: dried (lima, chili, black, navy, kidney and garbanzo). P33
o GOOD: S&W low sodium kidney or canned black beans (rinse well). P41
o GOOD: Safeway refried beans – no fat. P41
o BAD: light color – often contain sulfites. Worse if canned. P33, 50
o BAD: canned refried – commonly contains MSG. p24
· Beets
o BAD: sugar beets are used to make MSG. P10
· Beverages
o BAD: flavored - often contain MSG and aspartame. P17, 23
· Breath mints
o BAD: can contain MSG and aspartame. P23
· Butter
o GOOD: if no MSG additives including citric acid. P27, 33
o GOOD: ingredients are cream and salt only. Organic Valley. P39
o BAD: some have annatto, flowing agents, ultra-pasteurized cream. P24
· Buttermilk
o GOOD: make your own. Recipe on p33
o BAD: commonly contains some MSG. p24
· Candy, candy bars
o BAD: often contains MSG and aspartame. MSG from whey. P7, 23, 31
o BAD: sweets often contain MSG. P17
· Carrots
o GOOD: if not treated with Auxigro. p32
· Catsup
o GOOD: make your own. P26
o GOOD: Muir Glen. P40
o BAD: store bought - always contains MSG. P7, 24, 34
· Celery
o GOOD: p30
· Cereal (dry or cooked)
o GOOD: shredded wheat, farina, oatmeal, puffed wheat & rice. p34
o GOOD: rolled multi-grain. p34
o GOOD: some Barbara’s. Kashi. Red River cooked. Envirokids. P39
o BAD: many contain MSG. P7, 24
· Cheese
o GOOD: cheddar, mild - some can tolerate. Avoid pre-shredded. P32
o GOOD: colby cheese, mild - some can tolerate. P32
o GOOD: monterey jack cheese, mild - some can tolerate. P32, 39
o GOOD: mozzarella – most are okay. P39
o GOOD: Tillamook Colby Jack. Imported Romano and Parmesan. P39
o GOOD: mild cheddar sticks. Mozzarella cheese sticks. P45
o BAD: cheddar, aged – enzymes create MSG from milk. P32
o BAD: processed – MSG from “smoke flavor”. Sulfites. P17, 24, 29, 50
o BAD: yellow – also contain annatto for color. P32
o BAD: blue cheese - enzymes create MSG from milk. P32
o BAD: cottage cheese - most have carrageenan, whey and gum. P24, 33
o BAD: cream cheese - commonly contains MSG. p24
o BAD: romano cheese - enzymes create MSG from milk. P32
· Chili
o BAD: canned - commonly contains MSG. p24
· Chili sauce
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24
· Chinese food
o BAD: often contains MSG. P7
· Chinese Seasonings
o BAD: MSG. P11
· Chips
o GOOD: no preservatives or flavorings. P34, 43, 51
o GOOD: some tortilla chips and salsa. P34, 45, 52
o GOOD: Ruffles plain potato. Santitos corn (water soaked). Juanitas tortilla. P40
o GOOD: corn chips – if without lime soak. P34, 52
o GOOD: guacamole recipe. Onion dip recipe. P46
o BAD: flavored - contain MSG and/or sulfites. P17, 24, 50
o BAD: some tortilla/ corn chips soaked in sulfuric acid. Could create MSG. P52
o BAD: corn chips – slow cooked could release MSG. P52
· Chocolate
o GOOD: high quality imported. P26
o GOOD: dark chocolate. P40
o GOOD: Ghirardelli dark chocolate chips – may bother some. P40
o BAD: contain MSG/sulfites. Milk solids, dry milk, whey, lecithin. P27, 35
· Cider
o GOOD: locally made. Pasteurized is safer. P40
o BAD: some contain sulfites. P50
· Clams
o BAD: canned or smoked - tetra sodium pyrophosphate, MSG or sulfites. P21, 50
· Cocoa
o GOOD: baking. Most brands are okay. P27, 35, 40
o BAD: mixes – some contain MSG (whey, milk solids). P35
· Coffee-free roasted grain beverage
o BAD: made from barley malt. p25
· Confectioner’s sugar
o BAD: can contain cornstarch. P27
· Cookies
o GOOD: Cookie Lovers crème supremes – may bother some. P41
o GOOD: Paul Newman’s cream filled. Walker’s plain shortbread. P41
o BAD: can contain sulfites. P50
· Corn on the cob
o GOOD: fresh. P27
o BAD: contains natural glutamate, and is used to make MSG. P9, 49
· Crackers
o GOOD: Soda crackers - most are okay. Plain Wheat usually okay. P34
o GOOD: Ak-Mak. Kavli. Old Stone Mill. Tree of Life. Matzo. Wasa. P39
o BAD: esp. if (smoke) flavored or contain whey. P7, 17, 29, 31
o BAD: can contain sulfites. P50
· Cream
o GOOD: organic, whole. P27, 33
o GOOD: whipping cream – okay if without carrageenan or additives. P39
o BAD: can have carrageenan as MSG. p26
o BAD: whipping creams - some contain MSG. p24
· Creamers (non-dairy)
o BAD: commonly contains some MSG. p24
· Croutons
o GOOD: recipe on P27
o BAD: store bought commonly contains MSG. p24
· Dairy
o BAD: processed milk can contain MSG. p23
· Diet food
o BAD: contains MSG and aspartame. P7, 23, 24
· Dressings on fast food
o BAD: contain MSG. P17
· East Asian seasonings
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24
· Egg substitutes
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24, 32
· Eggnog
o BAD: can contain carrageenan MSG. p26
· Eggs
o GOOD: whole. Boiled. P32, 43
· Fast food
o BAD: most contains MSG. P7
· Fish
o GOOD: salmon, canned – naturally smoked okay. P35
o GOOD: fresh - most okay if not breaded or seasoned. P35
o GOOD: Erickson’s Choice canned salmon. P40
o GOOD: tuna, canned - low sodium without broth. P26, 35
o GOOD: Safeway Tongol canned tuna. P40
o BAD: tuna, canned – often contains MSG in broth. P7, 35
o BAD: frozen - some frozen contain sulfites. P35
o BAD: phosphate rinses can cause MSG-like reaction. P23
o BAD: fresh – some contain sulfites. Ask at counter. P50
· Flour
o GOOD: Gold Medal organic. Arrowhead Mills. Bob’s Red Mill. P34, 39
o GOOD: Most whole wheat and other grain flours. P39
o GOOD: Arrowhead Mills. P41
o BAD: bleached – has malted barley flour. Also cornstarch. P24, 34, 49
· French fried potatoes
o BAD: contain sulfites and can contain MSG. P6, 17
· Frosting & fillings (baked goods)
o BAD: commonly contains some MSG. p24
· Frozen snacks and meals
o GOOD: some Cascadian Farm organic frozen foods(vegetarian meal). P41
o BAD: often contains MSG. P7
· Fruit
o GOOD: dried - use dehydrator to make your own. P26
o GOOD: dried - unsulphured (unsulfured) dates/raisins. Dry pears. P35, 40, 51
o GOOD: mango, papaya, pomegranate, kiwi, pineapple. P46
o BAD: canned–can contain citric acid (corn). Sulfites not on label. P26, 33
o BAD: dried - some react to lecithin, phosphates, sulfites. P35, 50
o BAD: fruit rolls – some contain MSG and sulfites. P45
o BAD: maraschino cherries – sulfites. P50
o BAD: cut fresh fruit, frozen apples, flaked coconut – sulfites. P50
o BAD: grapes - treated with Auxigro. Imported often have sulfite. P32, 50
o BAD: apricots, dried - contain sulfites. P6, 51
· Fruit juice
o GOOD: grape juice - add water and sugar to make grape-ade. P25, 33
o GOOD: grape juice - heated and spiced. P33
o BAD: often contains sulfites and MSG. In pouch/can/bottle. P6, 33, 45, 50
o BAD: concord grape juice can contain white grape juice with sulfites. P25
o BAD: white grape juice – sulfites and corn syrup. P25, 52
o BAD: papaya nectar – sulfites from white grape juice. P52
· Fruit syrup
o BAD: contains sulfites. P6
· Gelatin desserts and candy
o BAD: contain MSG and possibly sulfites. P17, 24, 50
· Granola
o GOOD: granola bars. Trail mix. Homemade. P33, 43, 45
· Gravy
o BAD: bottled - commonly contains MSG. p24
· Gum
o BAD: can contain MSG and aspartame. P23
· Half & half
o GOOD: make your own with half cream & half milk. P33
o BAD: store bought commonly contains some MSG. p24
· Hamburgers
o GOOD: ok if no protein filler, seasoning salt, special sauce. P44
o BAD: fast food - can contain MSG. P17
· Hams
o BAD: commonly contains some MSG. “smoke flavoring”. P24, 29, 43
· Herbs
o GOOD: grow and dry your own. P28
· Honey
o GOOD: sugar substitute. P30, 40
· Hot dogs
o BAD: commonly contains some MSG and/or sulfites. P24, 50
· Ice cream
o GOOD: breyer’s vanilla – occasionally small amount can be tolerated. P33
o GOOD: some Haagen-Dazs. P41
o BAD: most contain MSG, often from whey or skim milk. P7, 24, 31, 33
· Jam, jelly
o GOOD: make your on. Recipe on p35
o BAD: some react to pectin and/or corn syrup in store bought. Sulfites. P35, 50
· Juice
o BAD: canned - many have MSG and sulfites. P33
· Lemon
o GOOD: fresh lemons - as salad dressing. p32
o BAD: lemon juice, bottled – contains sulfites. P6, 50
· Lettuce
o GOOD: p32
· Limes
o GOOD: p32
· Low fat & no fat “items”
o BAD: foods made like this often contain MSG. P22
· Macaroni and cheese
o BAD: boxed - MSG from whey. P31
· Maple Syrup
o BAD: many are watered down and contain preservatives. P40
o BAD: imitation contains corn products and sulfites. P49, 50
· Margarine
o BAD: commonly contains some MSG. p24
· Marjoram
o GOOD: p30
· Mayonnaise
o GOOD: Best Foods, Helman’s or Saffola but some cannot use. P40, 51
o GOOD: make your own. Recipe on P46, 52
o BAD: MSG as “natural flavor”&sulfur treated lemon juice. P7, 24, 28, 50
· Meat (beef or pork)
o GOOD: if not injected with MSG or dipped in broth. P23, 29
o BAD: processed or cured – contains MSG. P7, 17, 24
o BAD: beef - phosphate rinses can cause MSG-like reaction. P23
o BAD: pork (tenderized) – tenderized with phosphates. P23
· Milk
o GOOD: organic whole - Use sparingly. P27, 33, 39
o GOOD: low fat - dilute whole milk. P34
o GOOD: rice - use plain variety. P33
o GOOD: look for “cream top” milk in glass containers. P48
o BAD: contains natural glutamate and may contain MSG. P9, 17
o BAD: skim, low fat, no-fat –milk solids and gelatin added. P23, 24, 27, 47
o BAD: dry or evaporated – contains some MSG. milk solids. P24. 27
o BAD: rice beverages–can contain MSG if ultra-pasteurized. P24, 30
o BAD: chocolate milk – carrageenan. P45
o BAD: sulfites also in dairy products. Cows feed sulfa drugs. P47, 50
o BAD: Vitamin D fortified – often derived from Torula yeast. P47
· Molasses
o BAD: contains natural glutamate (& sulfites). P9, 28, 50
· Mozzarella
o GOOD: mild, fresh or whole milk – some can tolerate. P32
· MSG-free versions of food
o GOOD: on www.msgmyth.com - p24
· Mushrooms
o BAD: contain natural glutamate. P9
· Mustard
o GOOD: several brands are MSG free. P35
o GOOD: New Organics, Whole Foods or Tree of Life. P40
o BAD: common brands contain MSG. P24, 28
o BAD: Dijon - wine mustards have sulfites. P24, 28, 50
· Non-dairy milk in cartons
o BAD: most are ultra-pasteurized and contain MSG. p30
· Nuts
o GOOD: sugar coated – some are okay. P26
o GOOD: raw roasted/dry roasted almonds, walnuts pecans or peanuts. P35
o GOOD: Select Harvest. Planter’s dry roasted, unsalted. P41
o GOOD: nuts, raisins and dark chocolate chips as a snack. Dates. P45, 46
o BAD: flavored – commonly contains MSG. p24
o BAD: carrageenan or hydrolyzed protein used to make salt stick. P35
o BAD: many are treated with sulfur dioxide. P41
o BAD: shelled (roasted or raw) – some contain sulfites. P50
· Oat flakes, old fashioned
o GOOD: oatmeal breakfast. P33
· Oils
o GOOD: Olive oil, Safflower oil, Sunflower oil. P28, 33
o GOOD: Spectrum Naturals olive oil. Saffola safflower oil. P39
o BAD: can contain sulfites. P28, 50
o BAD: Canola oil - some researchers say this is harmful to humans. P34
o BAD: soybean oil - can be from genetically engineered soybeans. P28, 33
· Olives
o GOOD: black – use occasionally, may contain preservatives. P35
o BAD: oil and vinegar cured or green olives - sulfites. P35, 50
· Orange juice
o GOOD: add water and sugar to orange juice to make orange-ade. P33
o BAD: calcium and vitamin enriching can cause reactions. P33
· Oyster sauce
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24
· Oysters
o BAD: canned or smoked - commonly contains MSG and/or sulfites. P24, 50
· Parmesan
o GOOD: imported – some can tolerate. P32
o BAD: domestic – enzymes create MSG from milk. P32
· Pasta
o GOOD: imported. P33, 43
o BAD: some have reactions to vitamin enriched pasta. P33
· Pastries
o BAD: can contain MSG. P17
· Peanut butter
o GOOD: Adams 100% natural. P40
o BAD: some contain MSG. p24
o BAD: high in protein and sulfites are used externally on some nuts. P35
· Peas
o BAD: frozen – MSG added for flavor or color. P26
· Pectin candies (shaped worms, bears, etc)
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. P24
· Peppers
o GOOD: if not treated with Auxigro. P32
· Pickles
o GOOD: make your own. P35, 52
o GOOD: Farman’s. P40
o BAD: store bought commonly contain MSG and/or sulfites. P24, 35, 50
o BAD: relish – sulfites. P50
· Pies
o BAD: mixes – commonly contain MSG and/or sulfites. P24, 50
· Pizza
o BAD: restaurant or deli – commonly contains MSG. P17, 24
o BAD: frozen – commonly contains MSG and/or sulfites. P17, 24, 50
· Popcorn
o GOOD: dry natural. P34
o GOOD: ACT II. I Want My Ya-Ya. Pop Weaver. P41
o BAD: some react to possible sulfites or genetically modified corn. P34
o BAD: flavored (microwave or theater) – contain MSG. P17, 24
· Pot pie
o BAD: frozen – commonly contains MSG. p24
· Potatoes
o GOOD: if not Idaho & if not treated with Auxigro. p32
o GOOD: Jo Jos- baked slices. Recipe on P46.
o BAD: dehydrated, frozen, canned or peeled – contain sulfites. P6, 24, 50
· Poultry (Chicken and turkey)
o GOOD: labels that say “no additives or preservatives”. P27, 32
o GOOD: Foster Farms chicken. Organic free range. P40
o GOOD: Acme natural turkey. P40
o BAD: deli bought (fried or rotisserie) – commonly contains MSG. p17, 24
o BAD: can be injected w/ MSG or dipped in broth. P27, 43
o BAD: phosphate rinse can cause reaction. P27
· Pretzels
o BAD: seasoned – commonly contains MSG. p24
· Puddings
o BAD: packaged – can contain MSG. P17. p24
· Quinoa
o GOOD: rice substitute. P33
· Red pepper flakes
o GOOD: p29
· Red wine
o BAD: causes migraine. P17
· Restaurant food
o GOOD: salad dressing - oil/vinegar, lemon/orange, sugar/salt/pepper. P42
o GOOD: grilled fish or meat – no marinade, seasoning salt, sauce. P42, 43
o GOOD: Chinese – stir fry beef strips with veggies in oil/garlic/ginger. P42
o GOOD: Chinese – egg foo yung with no gravy. P44
o GOOD: baked potato with butter. Mushroom omelet (whole milk). P43
o GOOD: steamed, unseasoned fresh veggies with lemon and butter. P43
o GOOD: Burger King – burger with no sauce is okay. P44
o BAD: U.S. – usually contains MSG. P7, 17
o BAD: sauces, marinades, canned soup, battered fish. P42
o BAD: croutons, salad dressing, appetizers. P42
o BAD: soup – “made from scratch” can have canned soup base. P42
o BAD: Mexican grilled meats, rice & beans – ask what has Adobo. P42
o BAD: KFC – MSG in everything from the chicken to the gravy. P42
o BAD: McDonald’s–ask for ingredients. MSG in everything. P42
o BAD: grilled steak or fish – pan fried is better than grill MSG residue. P44
· Rice
o GOOD: brown, red wild – p33
o GOOD: white – rinse to remove vitamin binders and cornstarch. P33, 56
· Sage
o GOOD: p30
· Saki sauce
o BAD: sulfites. P50
· Salad
o BAD: bagged or deli – some are rinsed in citric acid. P17, 23, 24
· Salad dressing and dry mixes
o BAD: often contains MSG and/or sulfites. P7, 24, 35, 50
· Salsa
o GOOD: fresh in refrigerated area, without citric acid. Can make your own. P34
· Salt
o GOOD: sea salt, canning salt, Kosher salt or Realsalt. P29, 30, 35, 40
o BAD: flowing agents & iodine can contain dextrose or cornstarch. P24, 35
o BAD: Phosphate. P30
· Sandwiches
o GOOD: use sliced homemade meatloaf, chicken or roast beef. P29, 43
o GOOD: egg and tuna salad with oil, vinegar and avocado (no mayo). P43
o GOOD: peanut butter and banana, honey or jam. P45
o GOOD: tortilla roll-ups. Many options. P45
o GOOD: avocado, tomato, sprouts, raisins and nuts. P46
o GOOD: fried egg, mustard and catsup. P46
o BAD: coldcuts - USDA allows “spice/seasoning” to be MSG. P24, 17, 29
o BAD: coldcuts – most often will contain sulfites in some form. P50
· Sauerkraut
o BAD: contains sulfites. P6, 35, 50
· Sausages
o BAD: USDA allows “spice/seasoning” to be MSG. Sulfites. P24, 29, 50
· Seasonings
o GOOD: red and black pepper - P29, 35
o GOOD: fresh garlic and garlic powder. P27, 29, 32, 35
o GOOD: Chinese Five Spice, oregano, cumin, cilantro – P35
o GOOD: ginger, paprika – P35
o GOOD: chili powder, chili pods (pasilla, ancho) – P35
o GOOD: basil - P29, 35
o GOOD: Mustard powder, dry. P28, 35
o GOOD: Thyme - P30, 35
o BAD: Garlic salt – sometimes contains hydrolyzed protein.
o BAD: seasoning salt - commonly contains MSG. P24, 29, 35
· Seeds
o GOOD: sesame, poppy, sunflower, flax, caraway, fennel – P33
· School lunches
o BAD: contain MSG. P17
· Shrimp
o GOOD: large or farm raised. P35
o BAD: phosphate rinses can cause reaction. Avoid tiny shrimp. P23, 35
o BAD: sulfites sprayed on boat. P50
· Soda pop, soft drinks
o BAD: contains sulfites and MSG. P6, 7, 17, 34, 50
· Soup
o GOOD: frozen – make extra and freeze leftovers. Recipe on P29
o BAD: canned – often contain MSG and sulfites. P7, 29, 50
o BAD: dry mixes and dips – commonly contains MSG. p24, 35
· Sour cream
o GOOD: whole – okay for most people. P32
o GOOD: Knudsen’s or Daisy whole sour cream. P39
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. cultured product like cheese. p24, 32
· Soybeans
o BAD: processed - used to make MSG. P10
· Soy beverages, soy milk
o BAD: extremely high in MSG. p24, 30
· Soy sauce
o BAD: contains MSG from fermented soy beans. P9, 22, 29
· Spaghetti sauce
o GOOD: frozen – make extra and freeze. Recipe on P29, 34
o BAD: store bought commonly contains MSG. p24, 29
· Stevia
o GOOD: sweet herb ok if without maltodextrin. P23
o GOOD: Wisdom of the Ancients. P40
· Stuffing
o GOOD: recipe on P30
o BAD: mixes – commonly contains MSG. p24, 30
· Sugar
o GOOD: white cane. P30, 40
o GOOD: Sucanat. Raw sugar. P40
o BAD: brown sugar - Made from molasses. Can contain sulfites. P28, 30, 50
o BAD: beet sugar – sugar beets high in natural glutamate. Sulfites. P30, 40
o BAD: sugar production – can contain sulfites, especially beet sugar. P50
· Supplements
o GOOD: avoid them and eat more fresh fruits and vegetables. P31
o GOOD: Beyond-A-Century B6, Taurine or CoQ10 all as powder. P41
o GOOD: Nature’s Life vtmn C crystals. Ecological Formulas Tri-Salts. P41
o GOOD: vitamins without excipients. P55
o GOOD: put contents of gelcap in applesauce or with sugar and water. P55
o BAD: gelcaps – if made from gelatin or hydrolyzed vegetable protein. P23
o BAD: can contain MSG in cornstarch. Tablets. Sulfites. P17, 31, 49, 52
· Sweet potatoes
o GOOD: p32
· Tapioca
o BAD: tapioca starch is used to make MSG. P10, 28
· Tarragon
o GOOD: p30
· Tea
o BAD: flavored – “natural flavors”, citric acid or malt. Sulfites. P24, 34, 50
· Teriyaki sauce
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24
· Tofu
o BAD: made from fermented or hydrolyzed soy, so contains MSG. p24, 30
· Tomato
o GOOD: puree – recipe on P30.
o GOOD: Muir Glen puree. P41
o GOOD: raw or just heated through. P29, 32
o BAD: Tomatoes contain natural glutamate. P9
o BAD: stewed tomatoes - commonly contains MSG and/or sulfites. P24, 50
o BAD: canned – commonly contains MSG as citric acid. P24, 30
o BAD: store sauce, puree or paste – contains MSG/sulfites. P24, 30, 50
· Tortillas, flour or corn
o GOOD: without malted barley flour. Can make your own. P34
o BAD: can contain sulfites. P50
o BAD: flour - some contain exitotoxin L-cysteine. P23
· Vanilla Extract
o BAD: corn syrup often added along with corn alcohol. P49
· Vegetables
o GOOD: Stahlbush Island Farms frozen. Yokes organic frozen. P41
o GOOD: onions - if not treated with Auxigro. But high in sulphur. P29, 32, 52
o GOOD: cabbage - but high in natural sulphur. P32, 52
o GOOD: garlic – high in natural sulphur. Caution? P52
o BAD: canned or dried – many have MSG and/or sulfites. P33, 50
o BAD: bagged or seasoned – some contain MSG. p24
· Vinegar
o GOOD: organic pure apple cider (or plain rice sparingly). P30, 35, 51
o GOOD: Hain organic apple cider vinegar. Unseasoned rice vinegar. P40
o BAD: wine and balsamic contain sulfites. P30, 35, 50
o BAD: white distilled - MSG from grain fermentation. Sulfites. P35, 50
· Water
o GOOD: add lemon slice or organic peppermint tea bag. P25, 34
· Wheat flakes
o GOOD: rolled – breakfast cereal. P33
· Whey beverages
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24
· Whipped cream topping substitutes
o BAD: commonly contains some MSG. p24
· Worcestershire sauce
o BAD: commonly contains MSG. p24
· Yeast
o GOOD: Red Star plain yeast or “yeast” as the only ingredient. P24, 29
o BAD: most have some MSG. plain yeast does not have much. p24, 26, 29
· Yogurt
o GOOD: whole milk – culture on protein food may create MSG. P31, 35
o GOOD: Brown Cow or Dannon plain whole milk yogurt. P39
o BAD: usually has natural flavors, gums, milk solids, whey. P7, 24, 31, 35
o BAD: most often contains sulfites in some form. P50

OTHER BAD THINGS
· Air
o BAD: car exhaust, paper & lumber factory fumes – sulfites. P51
· Chicken pox vaccine
o BAD: contain free glutamate. P23
· Cleaning agents
o GOOD: All Free and Clear detergent. P41
o GOOD: Whole Foods grapefruit seed extract cleaning products. P41
o GOOD: Borax, baking soda, white distilled vinegar, hydrogen peroxide. P51
o BAD: can have lecithin, citric acid, citrates, hydrolyzed protein. P23
o BAD: avoid those with acids made from sulfur. Sulfamic acid. P51
o BAD: sodium lauryl sulfate/ammonium lauryl sulfate/sodium laureth sulfate. P51
o BAD: avoid phosphoric acid and phosphates. P51
o BAD: chlorine. P51
· Cosmetics
o BAD: can have lecithin, citric acid, citrates, hydrolyzed protein. P23
o BAD: sodium lauryl sulfate/ammonium lauryl sulfate/sodium laureth sulfate. P51
o BAD: avoid phosphoric acid and phosphates. P51
· Lotion
o BAD: can have lecithin, citric acid, citrates, hydrolyzed protein. P23
o BAD: sodium lauryl sulfate/ammonium lauryl sulfate/sodium laureth sulfate. P51
o BAD: avoid phosphoric acid and phosphates. P51
· Medication
o BAD: can contain MSG and/or sulfites. P23, 52
o BAD: hospital IV – can have MSG and/or sulfites. P23, 52
o BAD: sulfa drugs – author is allergic to, as well as sulfites. P6, 50
o BAD: pharmaceutical glaze for easier swallowing – hydrolyzed protein. P55
· Mouth wash
o BAD: can contain aspartame and “natural flavor”. P23
· Shampoo and conditioner
o GOOD: shampoo for color treated hair. Avoid hydrolyzed proteins. P41
o BAD: lecithin, citric acid, citrates, hydrolyzed protein. P23
o BAD: sodium lauryl sulfate/ammonium lauryl sulfate/sodium laureth sulfate. P51
o BAD: avoid phosphoric acid and phosphates. P51
· Soap
o GOOD: Clearly Natural. Dr. Bronner’s. Dove for sensitive skin. P41
o BAD: can have lecithin, citric acid, citrates, hydrolyzed protein. P23
· Toothpaste
o GOOD: baking soda or Homeodent
o BAD: can contain MSG (natural flavor) and aspartame. P17, 23

REMEDIES
· B6: may help. P53
· Calcium: Calcium, magnesium and glutamate interact. P55
· Coenzyme Q10: daily. P53
· Magnesium: help prevent glutamate from entering brain. P53, 55
· Orange juice: when symptoms begin. P53
· Taurine: during symptoms or daily. P53
· Water, laxative, fasting, enema: remove offending food. P53, 54
Dee 1950
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2006 - 7:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a problem with this list. I believe a person should learn to READ the labels instead of picking certain foods that are "bad" and eliminating them forever, or, even worse, picking foods that are "GOOD" and eating them without reading labels. Manufacturers CHANGE their products....what may be good today, may be bad tomorrow and vice versa.
By the way -- I have some non-fat powedered milk that does NOT have MSG.....are you saying that even though it's only has milk as the ingredient, that there may be MSG in the product anyway???
Pam E.
Posted on Tuesday, May 09, 2006 - 12:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The list is simply an index this gentleman has started to the book "Battling the MSG Myth" written by Debby Anglesey (the author of this web site). The Good and Bad labels are what this man has interpreted from reading the book.

Thank you for your concern, though most of us know that the food industry are changing their ingerdients all the time and we must continue to read labels even on items we have found to be safe.

Milk is naturally high in bound glutamates. The process used to powder the milk frees the glutamate. Free glutamate is the bad part of MSG. I would not use powdered milk.

Pam E.
Dee1950
Posted on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 - 11:25 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow -- thanks for the info on the milk....I hadn't known that -- and I use it all the time -- I USED to use it all the time -- won't any more!!!!
thanks again
ted lorup
Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 5:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently bought a box of kashi (brand name) Tasty Little Crackers. The front of the box contains this claim - No Hydrogenated Oils, Zero Grams Fat, All Natural.

When I read the ingredients, I discovered that the crackers contain autolyzed yeast. A search of the internet informs me that autolyzed yeast produces free glutamates which, it is reported, attack the central nervous system and cause a host of health problems.

A further search of the internet produced pages of links to supposedly health food and organic food stores selling this item.

I am flabbergasted that Kashi successfully passes this product off as wholesome and all natural and that so called health food stores sell this product.

As I learn more and more about the potentially harmful effects of the ingredients I see in the foods I buy, I have come to a conclusion.

To protect my health, I must stop eating!
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 5:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ted lorup,

To protect your health, you just have to watch out for junk like Kashi's Ranch or Country Cheddar cackers.

http://www.kashi.com/ourfood/TLCSnacks/Crackers/Default.aspx

Reading labels before you buy is a good start.

http://www.msgmyth.com/hidename.htm
Debbey
Posted on Friday, June 16, 2006 - 10:53 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you can eat just keep reading :-)
there is alot of food that is safe-it will take you a little while but I promise it will work
sometimes the labels look safe but it does not work...but try not to get frustrated.

I cannot eat sugar either but you get used to cross referencing the labels

crackers there is a water cracker I think Carrs makes it and there is 1 brand of matza I can eat.
I will look next time I go to the store.

..many organic products have maltodextrin :-( it amazed me in the beginning that organic was not always "safe"

lays organic potato chips work for me
they are awesome
organic cheetos are full of poisons
Star
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 04, 2010 - 5:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi there wondering about cornstarch? I have been avoiding all msg and free glutamate foods for two months now, and my energy is still low. I am slowly losing weight but not as quickly as I would like.. I am wondering where it might be hiding! I am avoiding all ingredients other than basic whole food ingredients..
I am thinking of getting an allergy test,
as well just thinking that it takes awhile for my body to balance out...
any feedback would be appreciated in regards to how long it took people to be symptom free...?
star
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 04, 2010 - 5:38 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hmmm I am wondering if it from the inorganic veggies that I have been eating!!! I have been so strict!!!!! But due to budgetary constraints have not been able to buy organic....!!!!!!!!!!!
Star
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 04, 2010 - 6:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ha, ha... I am also thinking baking powder!!!
I found this awesome link that I wanted to share:
Baking Powder is basically Baking Soda with additions like Creme of Tartar... with the active ingredient of tartaric acid that has been linked to many complications.... including Chronic Fatigue/Fibromyalgia.... !

http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/home/eng/candida.asp
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2010 - 4:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

star, very interesting article, something to research and ponder. thanks.
EmilyS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2010 - 10:43 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Star, give your self some time for your body to adjust to your new diet, it takes time. My conversion to this diet was spanned over 5 years so I can't give you an idea of a time frame but others here have said it took awhile for their bodies to adjust. Good luck!
Mariann
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2010 - 4:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Star you are correct in wondering about cornstarch it is on the list that Deb A.'s book lists as a problem. I have been trying to be really clean for almost 3 years. I had pretty good results right away, but continued to get migraines about every 10 days. That is pretty good considering I was getting 3 or 4 a week. I read here many times about changing soap, toothpaste, cleaning items even my contact lens solution. I had a lot of trouble with potatoes. I only eat organic or the ones from a local farm that proved to be OK for me. Non Organic veggies are definitely a problem for me, although some here do ok with them. I now use baking soda for toothpaste, an old standard hydrogen peroxide lens cleaner, that my eye doctor recommended, I will give you more info if you need it. I use goat's milk soap or one of the ones recommended here. Shampoo is an issue, innocent looking ingredients like citric acid are not innocent. I clean now with water and vinegar, I clean my sinks and bathroom appliances with baking soda. Use a baking Powder that is aluminum free. There are so many pitfalls, give us more information and we will one by one give a thumbs up or down for you. Keep at it, it is worth your health. Mariann
Star
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2010 - 11:05 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks guys/gals for the inspiration!!! When I get some extra $$ I am definitely getting Deb A's book as well as some more about grains and what not. I keep cleaning up my diet!! It is getting better every day... but what I am noticing is a sensitivity to sugar - especially apples. We'll see if it is still there with organic apples, and once I get my health care sorted out I am going for allergy testing! Any feedback that I need to be aware about the allergy testing process?
Again, thanks so much,
luv S
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2010 - 3:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Star,
Apples are mostly coated with corn wax this time of year. Even organic apples can be coated with GMO corn wax so we avoid them unless they are in season or unless I have a trusted source.

Grocery store produce can be full of trouble because of hidden ingredients. All bananas are gassed with ethylene (GMO corn gas) and so are potatoes and tomatoes. I am very careful with those particular fruits and veggies. Some veggies are OK if conventional, others I won't buy unless organic. I never buy conventional fruit, squash, cucumbers, rutabagas, potatoes, carrots, beets. I never buy prewashed produce or salad in a bag....I do buy conventional broccoli and cauliflower, peppers, turnips, green beans, I can't think off the top of my head. I don't buy tomatoes unless from a farmers market - same for mushrooms. I have found that I can eat both of those now as long as they aren't contaminated with GMO corn so I only buy them from local farmers. Local farmers don't wax veggies or gas them with ethylene or wash them with citric acid. That is only done to produce that needs to travel a long way.

I avoid cornstarch like the plague because I am corn allergic, but I think everyone should because it is GMO corn. I use only baking soda for quickbreads. What kind of meat do you eat? I have had the best luck with meat from local farmers, too. Meat gave me a lot of trouble until I figured out that they treat it with citric acid and lactic acid during processing. I look for meats that aren't treated with anything, now.
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 2:24 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's interesting that even organic apples can be coated with a GMO product. I wouldn't have ever thought that. But even if it is can't it be peeled off? Are organic bananas, potatoes and tomatoes also gassed with GMO corn gas?
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 12:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Di, as I understand it, organic produce can be contaminated with GMO corn wax or gas. I am trying to get a confirmation, but the produce managers don't know anything and the organic produce companies are not very forthcoming.

Also, lactic acid and citric acid made from GMO corn is approved by the USDA for use on organic meats. All vitamin D milk contains GMO corn, even the organic milk. Everyone is under the impression that buying organic keeps them safe from GMOs, but that just simply isn't true anymore. You wouldn't believe some of the stuff that is approved for use by organic farmers - the big organic corporate farms like Earthbound farms and Grimway use some mighty nasty stuff and are still considered organic.

Organic apples that are coated with corn wax can be peeled to minimize exposure but the skin is porous and there is contamination from the knife passing through the corn wax when peeling. No one has ever tested to see how much soaks in, but I can tell you one of the worst reactions my daughter and I suffered all year was from eating one clementine (satsuma). That was when I found out about corn wax on produce.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 1:48 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently felt off for a week and was going crazy trying to figure out the culprit..clementines I had been eating regularly. Kristy is so right. Those sprays contain hydrolyzed proteins and preservatives.
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 3:24 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So when you react to GMO corn wax or gas is it from the GMO or the corn factor?

It's unbelievable that you can't even trust organic to be safe - what can we eat?
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 9:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am not quite sure, to be honest. We call ourselves corn allergic because it is true that we can tolerate no corn and most people understand allergies. I am not brave enough to try eating heirloom corn on the cob to test my theory, but I do believe it is the GMO that we are reacting to. For one thing, we also cannot tolerate soy, canola, papaya or squash from the grocery store. For another, GMOs really are toxins and it makes sense that our body would reject them. I have done a lot of research on GMOs and I think our bodies react to them as if they are a toxin or allergen. I also believe that as long as you are not super sensitive, your body can tolerate these toxins in small amounts for a long time (but not forever and they are being used in ever-increasing amounts and even placed in pantry staples). We are more sensitive (my entire family seems to be, so I would say it is a genetic predisposition), so we have a lower tolerance for these GMO food additives. Repeated ingestion caused health problems that further hampered our body's ability to filter and remove the toxins so we got progressively worse.

I also believe that people who seem to be in perfect health could feel a marked improvement in their well-being if they were to avoid all food additives. I am still looking for a volunteer to prove my theory. :-)

None of this is proven in a scientific study although I have read studies that support my ideas. As long as corporations that profit from GMO corn derivatives (health insurance, pharmaceutical industry, hospital industry, food manufacturers, GMO patent holders) hold the purse strings for further research, I don't believe that there will be any studies to prove these things. As long as health care in this country is a vehicle for profit, there will be no significant advances on finding the true cause of our modern epidemics of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, acid reflux, autism, dyslexia, anxiety and depression. Our pharmaceutical industry would not survive without GMO corn because they are so heavily dependent on it to create drugs, but also because they are heavily dependent on it to create symptoms. I always say that without GMO corn, there would be no pharmaceutical industry, but without GMO corn we probably wouldn't need it.

The same can be said for grocery stores. They are so heavily dependent on GMO corn that without it, the shelves would be virtually empty. There are only about a dozen food items in my local Kroger that are completely GMO corn-free (counting produce as a food item and spices as a food item). There are probably not more than twice that even in Whole Foods. We are going to have to find a good farmers market and make friends with farmers or learn to grow our own or get involved with politics in hopes of changing food laws. The only problem with the last option is that there are six lobbyist for every congressman in Washington and there is no way we could compete with them financially.
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 2:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, Thanks, you are very well spoken.

I guess you have to trust someone sometime, but can you even trust the local farmer to be truthful? I live in Michigan and I don't trust anyone trying to make money, farmers included.
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 12:59 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is a lot easier to detect whether someone is telling the truth when you are standing face to face and watching them talk. Also, those corn tricks aren't generally done by local farmers.....they are mostly done to produce that needs to travel a long way. Most local farmers aren't even set up to gas potatoes or wax veggies.
EmilyS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 11:03 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Star, you mentioned you wondered about the allergy testing process. I've looked through some past postings and can't see what your current symptoms are. What symptoms are you experiencing within minutes or hours of eating (any swelling, hives, etc.)?

There are two tests for actual Ige allergies- a scratch test and a blood test called a RAST. Both have false negatives (more so with the scratch test) so it is important to look at what's happening in real life to your body and use the testing as a guide.
Mariann
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 12:54 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't use Baking Powder often, but I just noticed the ingredients on the Rumford BP Aluminum Free, but it says monocalcium phosphate, bicarbonate of soda, cornstarch (from nongenetically modified corn.) I love the last line, because it means a lot of people must be worried and informed about that. I am wondering if I should just make my own from Debs book. It makes me wonder if some of the mystery headaches I have gotten have been from that. What do you think? Mariann
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 1:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you bake often using commercial baking powder, the recipe in my book is very easy and not expensive, even though the cream of tartar is the most costly of the 3 ingredients. I just mix baking soda, cream of tartar and arrowroot powder. I quadruple the recipe and store it in a glass jar. You can even freeze some of it for longer shelf life, if you like. It works just the same as any commercial brand I've used. In the book, there's also a recipe for using just baking soda and either vinegar or fresh lemon juice where baking powder is called for. Can't recall the amounts.
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2010 - 8:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mariann, You are so right. Almost all baking sodas and yeasts contain corn (the yeast is grown on corn so it may not show on the ingredients). Featherweight baking soda is corn-free. Also, Red star yeast in packets in corn-free, but the Red Star in a jar isn't. I can't find Featherweight around here anywhere so I just continue to use Deb's mix. I had trouble finding even the ingredients when I lived in AL, but now all of them are readily available. I can't find the yeast here either so I just make quickbreads instead of yeast breads. (We like biscuits better than yeast rolls in my family anyway!)

Also, you can look for Kosher for Passover items. You can sometimes find corn-free versions of some things like white chocolate chips, chocolate chips, marshmallows, condiments, jam, confectioners sugar (whole foods and trader joe's now carry confectioners sugar with tapioca starch instead of cornstarch all year). If I could find KFP items here I would love it.
Mariann
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2010 - 12:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi guys thanks for the info, I looked and looked in the book for the recipe and can't find it. I did look for arrowroot today and found Mc Cormick is that OK, I am going to Whole Foods tonight, it is right up the street from my grand daughter's soccer game, so I can do two things at once for the trip. If you see this in enough time Deb, what brand do you use of arrowroot, and is there any reason not to buy the Mc Cormicks, anything I should know about cream of tartar, do you use Organic. Sorry I am so full of questions, but when I think I may have dispelled a hidden source of fga I get so energized. Kristy I do use the Red Star packets,I am going to see if I can find some safe Vanilla since Passover is on the radar screen. Is tapioca safe for us? I tend to avoid that. I would love to be able to have it and add it to Deb's pudding recipe. Deb I don't know what I would do without your book. I am reading it over again now for the 4 time probably. I was looking for the rec. for Baking Powder sub., and got hooked again on all the good information. It is amazing how much you miss even after a couple of readings. You have probably heard "The head will absorb, what the seat will endure" That is so true and the info is so riveting and pertinent to our lives you just want to absorb it all in in one sitting, NOT GONNA HAPPEN! I appreciate the info, I'll let you know how I make out. I am printing more and more information and putting it into 3 ring binders, in case the internet becomes unavailable. Mariann
Mariann
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Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2010 - 4:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Deb and Kristy, I just got in from Whole foods. They have vanilla without alcohol, but it has glycerin in it, with vanilla extract and water. I didn't know about the glycerin. It wasn't organic either. The organic one had alcohol. I found two arrowroot products, one by 365 brand and one by Frontier, neither is organic. They had 2 cream of tartar. same brands, neither organic as well. Kristy I think you get your vanilla from Amazon, is that right. You get your cocoa there as well if I remember correctly, I will be putting in an order. I did read a recipe for doing your own vanilla extract using vanilla beans and it specified good potatoe vodka from Poland I think. I was a bit concerned about the potatoe vodka because of the spraying, but if it is from Poland it might be OK. I'd love to make my own or find it without alcohol if the glycerin is OK. One more ques. Deb I saw French twice milled soap at Whole Foods, they had Lavender and many other delightful fragrances. The only ques. I had was that they list vegatable glycerin and veg. oil, palm oil or olive oil in the Lavender one, and I didn't see a plain olive oil soap. Does that sound like the one you get. Thanks Mariann
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, March 10, 2010 - 9:28 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Mariann, I have a link to Amazon for the vanilla and cocoa that I buy on my blog. Look in the right column for my Amazon links and you should find the exact products I buy. I just noticed tonight that I need to get more vanilla. I always buy whole beans and ground so I may try making my own vanilla extract, too, this time. http://www.livingitupcornfree.com/

I don't remember what brand of arrowroot that I bought in a large bag (maybe bob's red mill?). I haven't seen any of it here except in the small spice jars. I have had no trouble with McCormick arrowroot or cream of tartar. I have read of cross contamination issues with some tapioca, but I can't remember which brands (I'm pretty sure Ener-G brand is safe).
Deb A.
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Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2010 - 4:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, what marshmallows are you able to eat? All the ones I found have corn syrup, egg whites and gelatin. Mariann, sorry I missed your inquiry about the arrowroot. I just buy it bulk along with the cream of tartar at my local health food store. You should be fine with the products you bought, even the soap. Sometimes we just have to try something and be guinea pigs. :-( I do make tapioca pudding sometimes... for the large fish eye pearls, I soak in water overnight before simmering in a little more water on low heat...I add the milk and cream at the end, since I don't like cooking milk long. I also add the sugar and egg yolks after the pearls are soft...I do the same for medium size pearls, but they don't need to soak overnight...just an hour. Instant...no soaking. Tapioca contains some glutamate, but natural glutamate in moderation is the key. I have no problem with glycerin in some items.
kristy
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Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2010 - 5:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Deb, We don't eat marshmallows, but there is a mock marshmallow cream made from rice that is corn-free called Suzanne's Ricemellow cream. I don't know what the ingredients are because I have only read about it - it may contain a bunch of unnatural or GMO ingredients. Also, I think there are kosher for passover corn-free marshmallows. I don't have access to any KFP foods here so I don't really know anything about it except what I read on the forums.

You're right about being a guinea pig. I am about to go out on a limb buying meat for us. I have done all the checking that I can possibly do - now all I can do is hope everyone holds up to their promises and we don't get sick from it. In the end, that is really the only way to be sure.
Mariann
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Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2010 - 6:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the tips Kristy and Deb, can you give me a hint which page or section the recipe for Baking Powder substitute is listed. I checked the substitute section and a few other spots that looked like it could be listed, but I can't find the measurement amount. I know it is baking powder, cream of tartar and arrowroot, but not how much of each. I hadn't picked up the glass spice sized bottles at Whole Foods, just read them and decided to wait. I am going to check out a local health food store to get it in bulk, that feels a little safer. Your right sometimes you just have to take a leap of faith. It is easier if I have been feeling good for a longer period of time. Kristy good luck with the meat, I know you got burned and I admire your guts. Thanks for being there. Mariann
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, March 16, 2010 - 3:46 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mariann, the baking powder recipe is on page 186.
Mariann
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Posted on Wednesday, March 17, 2010 - 9:40 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is a great piece of news, (for me anyway). I was talking to my daughter and told her I was re-reading your book Deb. I told her I was looking for the Baking Powder recipe and she said Oh it's on page 186 Mom. I was stunned, "How did you know that I said." She told me that she was reading the one that I gave her 2 or more years ago. Changing the foods they eat more and more and finding new lunch ideas for her 2 wonderful children. She has always done their lunches instead of school lunches because brilliant kids that they are, they don't like school lunches. I am so happy that she is doing her own research. Thank you Deb for sharing all these good ideas and information to live by for us all. And thanks for the page number on Baking Powder. I think I may have to do the baking soda with vinegar or lemon juice because I understand that Cream of Tartar is from fermented grapes, not sure how that will be for me. I use Santa Cruz organic pure squeezed lemon juice, not from concentrate. I do OK with it, but don't use it often so I am not sure what would happen if I use it a lot.Anyway Happy St. Patrick's Day to all. Mariann
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, March 17, 2010 - 6:52 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mariann, sometimes I just use baking powder if I dont' have any baking powder mixed up....I am not sure it makes any difference to add the arrowroot and cream of tartar but I just keep doing it. I would be interested in making two batches of the same thing using each and see if there is any difference.
Mariann
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Posted on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 6:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, sometimes I get a little bit chicken to try new things when I haven't had reactions. It feels so good to feel good. Mariann
Deb A.
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Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2010 - 9:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So happy to hear about your daughter, Mariann. I am so thrilled because my brother-in-law who I have suspected to be MSG sensitive, and my sister, are now taking me seriously. It took 15 years! He has been getting progressively worse, and in recent months, has been rushed to the ER with chest pain and racing heart. No attack. One of the many doctors he saw, ordered a liver sample, suspecting he was in the last stages of liver cancer! Then followed several more specialists and tests. I told them I suspected his symptoms were caused by MSG, even the stomach pain. Finally, after all the tests, including allergy tests were concluded and negative, he called two days ago to say he knows MSG is the culprit. When he mentioned it to his doctor, the nurse said she was "allergic" to it, too. But she called it a preservative, and she said it was the high concentration of sodium in it that was bad. Yikes! These medical professionals get me so irked! I seem to do okay with the cream of tartar I buy at our health food store. Yes, it may contain sulfur residues, but I suspect that the amount used compared to the size of the baked good is not enough to bother me. Most of the cakes I bake call for just baking soda...which needs an acid in the recipe to react...like sour cream, vinegar, lemon juice, apple sauce, etc.
kristy
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Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2010 - 2:26 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb, I always get great results with baking powder and now I know why. Since we can't find corn-free milk, I use Daisy full fat sour cream as a milk replacer. I knew it made exceptional biscuits but never did think about the acidity......I was always disappointed that I couldn't find corn-free buttermilk. Duh! Also, I don't remember if I ever posted it, but Featherweight baking powder uses tapioca starch instead of cornstarch.

My Mom has finally starting making changes, too. She has a lot of the same symptoms that I had so I helped her find safe versions of her staples and she started cooking more from scratch and she is so excited about her improvement. I also got her hooked on fermented veggies because she suffered from heartburn and reflux so terribly. She was taking prilosec every day but still was unable to eat after 2 pm or reflux would keep her up all night. She is now convinced that fermented veggies are a miracle cure. I was so worried about her....it only took her a year to come around. :-)
Mariann
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Posted on Sunday, March 21, 2010 - 2:39 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb thanks for the info on the baking powder, I think I will use the baking soda and an acid like the sour cream that Kristy uses. I have used Daisy sour cream a lot lately after reading about it in one of Kristy's posts. I love it. I make dip with my own organic dill from last summer, that I dried, my parsley and store bought pioneer organic oregano. I also baked a bunch of onions as per Kristy's recipe on her blog. Living it up corn free. PS (I love that blog Kristy, so much good info.) So that will work well and I bet it makes the baked goods so moist. Thanks to all of you. Mariann
Kaye
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Posted on Monday, March 22, 2010 - 9:39 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How can I find Kristy's blog? Thanks
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 1:06 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the compliment, Mariann. I just made some onion and cauliflower dip tonight for tomorrow. I tried the cauliflower because I had the florets along with chopped red bell pepper and onion in the fridge for a salad. I knew I would never be able to eat it before it went bad so I decided to roast it. We liked it so much that I purposely prepared cauliflower and onion this time (saving the red pepper for taco rice) just for the dip. These will be the last ones since we are about to go strictly no grains and sugar again now that we got our side of beef. Yahoo!! I bought some pork chops from the meat processor - it is from corn-fed hogs but has no corn added during processing so we will see if we can tolerate it. keep your fingers crossed.

Kaye, here is the link to my blog: http://www.livingitupcornfree.com/
Mariann
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Posted on Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 5:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy that dip sounds so good. I will be trying that one. Good luck with the meat Kristy, we will be thinking of you. Let us know what happens. I am going to make your ketchup for my husband today. I think it is on your blog. I may have printed it, I keep a lot of the postings in my 3 ring binder, now I even have them in order so I can pull up anything I need to know at any time. Now that I feel well I am a dynamo again. I just finished tiling my bathroom floor and today we put in the new john and vanity. I love working with my hands. I am anxious to have the house all in order before my surgery, so it gave me a little push to get started. Mariann
kristy
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Posted on Friday, March 26, 2010 - 12:03 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You are amazing, Mariann. I've never tiled a bathroom, but I have done my fair share of painting and building. Hope your hubby loves the ketchup as much as my kids do. I am trying to get my seedlings started and I haven't even found my seeds yet. I think I have plenty of time since it won't get dry here long enough to plant. My mom is coming over next week to help us get some tomatoes and herbs started. She bought us some of those upside down tomato planters and a raised bed contraption so I can get a few things started. If I could just get some cucumbers, squash, tomatoes and peppers, I would be happy this year. If I can get a chicken coop built she could hatch a couple of chicks for us.
Mariann
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Posted on Friday, March 26, 2010 - 5:16 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh my word, I would love to have chickens. Oh and a goat too. No room here though. Kristy be careful of some of the seed starter mediums because of the feather meal ingredient. Nothing better than planting with your Mom. My grandson and i have a little greenhouse contraption, pretty cheap to buy. Just a metal tubular frame like a book case sort of with wire racks that go in. It has a plastic cover with a zippered door of sorts. We love it. I got my organic seeds this week. I have a little sun room out back that I put it in, but you could just put it in front of a sunny window. Make sure you have catch trays under each seed starter to collet the runnover water. They have new seed starter kits that give you the bottom tray, a seed section and a top to self water. You just fill the troth in the bottom tray once a week. It is like a mini greenhouse. I have been doing the beds and getting ready. I am very upset though about my compost bin that B made for me. It is about 4 ft. square with boards that slip up and out and a sectioned top. I have been composting since last year at this time. As I would turn it over, there were so many worms it was almost scary. Then the pond in my back yard started coming up, up and up. My bin is half under water. I hope all the nutrients have not leached out. I am hoping that the rich water from rotted leaves and little water critters and duck, "stuff" will enrich the compost instead of rob it. Oh Well, the garlic is coming up though and I am thrilled about that. We are having a ton of rain in New England right now, hope it isn't as bad as last year. We went to a play last night that my grandson was doing lights and music for, my granddaughter informed me tha at the high school they have an agriculture group and you can get eggs there on Fridays, for free. I am definitely going over there today. I will gladly give them some kind of donation for that. As for tiling, it is so easy, just take your time, it is like playing in mud, seriously and nothing is more satisfying. Nothing I like better than tearing out a wall or tiling. We have done a lot of that in our 45 years as a married duo. Good luck with the planting and by the way how is the meat working out. I keep thinking of you with that. Mariann
Evelyn
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Posted on Friday, March 26, 2010 - 6:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And now I know why you appreciate my sense of humour, Mariann - from one (transplanted) New Englander to another! Can you tell us where to get the greenhouse? I was going to do raised beds here, but am afraid to go to a lot of trouble, ie. more than to drive downtown to the farmers Market or out to Tonopah Robs CSA farm, and end up with nothing, since I have never gardened in the desert.
kristy
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Posted on Friday, March 26, 2010 - 7:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Mariann, I have a freezer full of beef (and a little in the refrigerator freezer, too) and we have already sampled some ground beef. I figured if there was going to be a problem it would be with the ground beef. It was delicious and no reactions!!

full freezer - half cow

I was even able to get all the fat and bones so I can render some tallow and make some bone broth. I feel so much better now that I know we won't starve.

You know, Evelyn, you can make one with a clear shower curtain and a baker's rack. If you want to start with something easy, try radishes and lettuces and herbs. Just a little raised bed will grow plenty of those. You could try one of those upside down tomato planters, too. I've had one before and we had tons of tomatoes from it. You do have to water it every day, but that is it. Plant it and water it and harvest tomatoes....easy as pie.
kristy
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Posted on Friday, March 26, 2010 - 7:04 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Evelyn, I meant to say that you could make one of the greenhouses...... Also, I was going to say that zucchini is extremely easy to grow. One plant will keep you in zucchini all season. I have actually grown tomatoes and peppers in containers when I had only a balcony.
Mariann
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Posted on Friday, March 26, 2010 - 7:39 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Evelyn, the greenhouse I was talking about looks like a bakers rack with a shower curtain over it, only it has a really cute zippered door, that you can unzip and roll up. I got mine at the super pharmacy near here, but you can get them at Walmart or any discount store, or hardware store, they are all over the place. If that fails try online. I think I paid about 20 dollars for mine 5 or 6 years ago. i just hose it down after and let it dry then it all comes apart and into a big garbage bag and goes away for the winter. Kristy is right zuccini is incredible. I don't know how it will be to garden in the desert, but you could probably have fruit trees or avacados too, I drool when I think of having my own avacado tree. Not gonna happen here though. Just stick those plants in and water them, something will happen. I was happy to get one piece of vegetable when I first started. It just grows each year. I must say gardening has taught me patience. I just bought a new book about composting today.
Kristy I am so happy about the meat you got, it looks just beautiful. Simple things huh, like not starving can make you so happy. There are blessing to this problem that we all share. It has been a journey and I see there are some new people weighing in here as always. Keep posting and asking questions, you will learn so much and you WILL get better. Every single person can benefit from getting rid of free glutamic acid from their food, whether you are as sensitive as we are or not. You will feel healthier, because you will be healthier. Good luck to all and Kristy trully I am so happy for you and your family, have fun with Mom planting. Mariann
Evelyn
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Posted on Saturday, March 27, 2010 - 5:39 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok! I'm going to take the plunge and try the raised beds. Thanks for all the info. I could live on zuchini, so that will be nice to have, yellow squash too - these are things we grew in NE. And Mariann - you'll be jealous, I have fresh grapefruit, lemons and oranges. Others grow plum and pomengranate. I'm going to root around for some heirloom seeds today.
Mariann
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Posted on Saturday, March 27, 2010 - 11:06 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Evelyn you are so right, I would love fruit trees. I would choose fig, organge lemon, grapefruit, apple and of course avacado. I bought some blueberry and rasberry sticks, they call them bushes, but they are very tiny. Also got some strawberries and 2 grape starter bushes. I am loving growing my own food. I just finished my last butternut squash harvested last late fall. I have a very cool corner in my basement sort of walled off and it kept them very well. Mariann
kristy
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Posted on Sunday, March 28, 2010 - 3:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Evelyn, Good luck with your gardening. Keep us posted on your progress.

Mariann, I believe you are in the NE, aren't you? I read Eliot Coleman's book "Four Season Harvest" - he's in Maine and he has fig trees. It is a fantastic book. One of the few gardening books that I actually bought after borrowing it from the library. I need to get some blueberry bushes, too.
Mariann
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Posted on Sunday, March 28, 2010 - 5:58 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy I will look that book up. I was looking for the Ferment Book at Waldens Book store yesterday, but no luck. I think I will order it or look on Amazon. Some books, you just need to own. Yes I am in New England, little old Rhode Island. I am so excited about the blueberry bushes. I bought 3 actually. On the tag it says they need a cross pollinated bush and it lists the ones to choose from. I have two of that one and another name. However, plant number 3 isn't on the list. So I have to go get another one. Oh well 4 bushes will be fine with me. I am going to try a fig tree by golly. I can't get the picture of your freezer out of my mind, it was just beautiful. I remember when I was smitten with make up and jewelry now it is a freezer full of safe meat. Life is good. Mariann
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, March 29, 2010 - 12:57 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, the picture of your freezer inspired me! I am going to clean up my fridge and freezers this week. I have one for meat and one for fruits and veggies in the garage. Will take some time!
kristy
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Posted on Tuesday, March 30, 2010 - 1:00 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mariann, there is a link on my page to both of those books at Amazon. I remember watching Eliot Coleman and Barbara Damrosch (sp?) on their gardening show back a few years. Another book that is an absolute keeper is Nourishing Traditions. Those have to be in my top four reference books of all time (the other is Deb's).

Deb, We really didn't have any choice...we were forced to play freezer tetris to get it all to fit. We laughed and laughed trying to figure out how to get it all in there. I am definitely going to be looking for a small chest freezer for veggies this summer. The only place to put it is in the living room, but it has to be done. I am looking for a good dehydrator, too. I want to dehydrate my own spices and herbs this year.
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, March 30, 2010 - 8:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow! You are doing some great things. It's sure worth it.
Mariann
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Posted on Tuesday, March 30, 2010 - 3:38 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks for the tips Kristy. I have the first B. Damrosch book and I saw an updated Organic one the other day at the book store, I should have just picked it up, I will have to go back now. Kristy I dried my parsley in the oven according to a method on the internet, you do it low and slow. It stayed very green and beautiful, I use it all the time. Next year I will grow more, or I should say this year. I hung my dill plants upside down hanging into a large brown paper bag and then just crumpled it between my fingers, it breaks down really easy. Alas, however, the garlic I planted in the fall is under water right now. In RI we are having much flooding. I have a pond behind my house and it is inching closer every hour. My back gardens are under two feet of water. I'm thinking the garlic will rot. I did put it in 3 different areas of the yard, to see where it would grow best. It looks like one area may make it. Here is the good news the rising water will recede and my ground will be fertilized organically. My compost bin is capute though. Well a lot of people are worse off than we are, so I won't complain. My house is up some above the under water area so I think the house will be OK. My parsley from last year is popping up. It said it was possible for it to be perennial in some areas. I guess we are in that area, so I am hoping to get my hands on a fig tree too. Mariann
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, March 30, 2010 - 8:59 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hope the water recedes real fast, Mariann. Heard about the flooding in your area. So sorry. We're worried about lack of water for gardens and lawns in our area, S.E. Washington...it's a desert climate that relies on 3 rivers for irrigation...from melting mountain snow, which we had little of this year. Not all of our state is wet!
kristy
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Posted on Wednesday, March 31, 2010 - 1:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have had a very wet winter here in MS. We are just now into a stretch of 4 days without rain which is the longest we have gone in quite some time. I was worried if it didn't stop raining that I was going to be growing either rice or cranberries! Sounds like you have had it worse than us, though, Mariann. Deb, I didn't realize there were areas of Washington that weren't all wet. I bet you hear that alot.
Mariann
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Posted on Thursday, April 01, 2010 - 5:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb I felt the same way that Kristy did about Washington State. We all can learn a lot more about our great country. I thank God for all of you and this site that let's us learn how to be safe and healthy to then help others in turn. Well the water came within inches of the house, but we are dry, if not high and dry right now. All my back gardens are under water by a couple of feet and the compost bin is at least a foot under water. It is about 3 ft or more tall. The compost was so black and beautiful with a gazillion worms. This is the highest water in over 100 years here. So many people are in real trouble, I feel blessed to only have lost some gardens. I had not put my blueberry, rasberry, grapes or strawberry plants yet. I was going to put them near the pond, because blueberries especially like wetness, I will re thing that one. You know Kristy I could probably do cranberries. I buy a case and a few extra small preserve jarred cranberry sauce from an organic farm in Mass. I use it as jam on my peanut butter crackers. It is like strawberry preserves, a nice jelly and some pieces of cranberry. It has only org. cran. water and org. sugar. It works great. I will definitely look into cranberries. Deb we were worried about water not that long ago too. Our pond which is about 10 acres almost dried up a couple of times, but it recovered. Who knows, life is interesting. Kristy, I have some fermented carrots and turnips that I did at the turn of the year, so that would make them 3 months old, never opened, are they still OK. If they don't smell bad is that the way you can tell. Mariann
kristy
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Posted on Saturday, April 03, 2010 - 10:02 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mariann, they should be just fine. They will probably just taste more pickled than newer ferments do. Back in the day, most people preferred sauerkraut after it had aged for at least a couple of months. There are recipes out there now that call for fermenting at a cooler temp for 6 weeks at a minimum.
Mariann
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Posted on Monday, April 05, 2010 - 1:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Kristy, I will try them I tried to respond last night to your answer, but had trouble making a post, so I will try it again now. I am happy that you think they will be OK. I will smell them and make the decision to taste. Mariann
Anonymous
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Posted on Monday, April 05, 2010 - 2:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Star, a noticed feeling better after a week, but it took a solid year even to start losing weight and really recovering :-)
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 7:28 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I love to surprise people about this warmer, sunnier corner of WA. The lilacs are blooming now. The Olympic mountains divide the state in the middle, so the rain falls west of them. The hills here are covered with sagebrush and tumbleweed, unless irrigated. This is an agricultural part of the state, thanks to extensive canals...the orchards and vineyards surround this area. Our farmer's market is ranked #1 in the state. So glad your home is safe, Mariann. Happy to hear about your berry plants, too.
Mariann
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Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 3:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Deb, it was a little scary watching the water edge it's way toward our house. A lot of the state is really in trouble, many people are in dire straights. I feel so bad for them. Your state sounds just beautiful. I am looking to put my new plants in this week, can't wait. Mariann
EmilyS
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Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 7:17 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mariann, I'm so glad to hear your home is okay. Sorry to hear about your yard and compost- keep us posted on how the rest of your yard recovers from the high waters.

What an interesting thread about our different locations. Lilacs blooming already- how exciting! We had snow again here in Utah. My garlic is growing in the garden that I planted last fall and I just transplanted my 30 indoor tomato plants to larger pots. I've started quiet a bit of vegetables indoors this year that I'll transplant into the garden next month. My indoor lettuce is almost big enough to start eating. :-)
Mariann
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Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2010 - 4:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Emily how are you doing the indoor lettuce? That sounds very interesting. I put garlic in last fall as well, one garden with it is underwater. The poor little things, they were about 6 inches tall. I have a few in a small garden and I have a bunch in the front garden. So hopefully I will have some. I tried, what they called green garlic for the first time from our local farmer's market. I just means the skins are not dried yet. It is very different than the regular stuff. It is so good. All of my flower bulbs are up and I am getting my seedlings ready. I love this time of year. Thanks for your good thoughts, I will just get another compost bin going. Many people here have lost so much, I can't complain. Mariann
EmilyS
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Posted on Friday, April 09, 2010 - 11:13 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Mariann, I grow my plants indoors under one warm and one cool bulb. I use shop lights and adjust the height with the chains that come with the lights as the plants grow. If you send me an email at savoryseasonings at gmail dot com I'll send you some pictures of my indoor set up.
Mariann
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Posted on Friday, April 09, 2010 - 3:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'll do that Emily, I start my plants in a portable greenhouse, just shelves and a plastic house over it, but the grow lights might be really helpful. I am going to have to put the rest of my planting on hold for a bit. My surgery is on Monday, can't wait to get it over with. I will check out savoryseasonings. Thanks. Mariann
Star
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Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2010 - 4:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Kristy wanting to pick your brain about Corn..
re: bagged salads - are they usually rinsed in citric acid? I know I react something furious to citric acid... and are all produce inorganic or organic rinsed in citric acid or other crap???

wow, no wonder i have problems with even fresh veggies!
I am going to stop assuming it is my digestion that is the problem!! I am having an epiphany! This whole time I think I have been reacting to the crap on the produce... !

p.s. re: a question put forth back in March about the allergy testing... good advice. My symptoms mainly are bloated, gassy, instant bathroom trips within 30 minutes of eating, foggy headed, irritabilility, low energy, and anxiety. But as I posted previously.. they are disappearing! And I am building my stamina up. I am now becoming this master detective, as I see others are, and I am going to scrutinize, scrutinize everything I buy in the store, and will stop assuming that I am the problem!!!!
thanks again, everyone!
luv Star
kristy
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Posted on Friday, June 18, 2010 - 2:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Star, I'm glad to hear you are figuring this whole thing out. Let me know if I need to post the addresses to the best corn sites. I think I have but can't quite remember. I don't buy any produce that is prewashed, bagged or sliced or packaged and I don't buy any peppers, cucumbers, squash, eggplant or fruit that isn't organic. I have much better luck buying my produce at the farmers market because the corny stuff is reserved for produce that travels a long way to keep it "fresh". My farmers market is excellent and if the vendors offer produce that isn't grown by them, they will tell you. They also know everything that was done to it, unlike the produce manager at the grocery store.

I just read someone on the AC forum say that her Publix grocery store is ordering green bananas for her so that she doesn't have to buy the gassed ones. I never even considered that an option, but I have never had any luck with the produce manager at my store. He seems to know less about the produce than I do.

Other things to be aware of: cornstarch in packaging. It is used in things you would never guess like deli meat, cheese, paper plates, frozen veggies and fruit, etc. Corn adhesive is also very popular on products like the produce stickers, first and last paper towel or toilet tissue on the rolls, feminine products, envelopes, temporary sticky like post-its, some pens and stationary are very corny as well.

Some clear plastic cups and take-home containers are made of corn now. The berries in my store are in corn plastic. Hairspray, deodorant, shampoo, lotion, make-up, toothpaste, Q-tips, cotton balls, lip balms, fabric and new clothes, memory foam, cigarette paper, most domestic alcohols including wine, beer, and liquor. Vanilla extract, spice blends, some essential oils, cheap olive oil, enriched foods including organic milk and almost every supplement and Rx or OTC med. Bottled water and water filtration systems, charcoal, lots of building supplies and household chemicals, anything scented (febreeze and air fresheners), pet food and treats, many yarns and other craft supplies. Baby wipes and some diapers and nipples
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, June 06, 2012 - 12:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Corn starch/flour. Is there a difference. I have a new biscuit recipe i have been happily making for the kids and it contains cornflour. All seemed well with them, until yesterday. Day four of eating the biscuits and my youngest is in bits. She is in a full swing reaction. Ive bathed her in epsom salts ( i finally got to try out the theory that that may help) and i have to say she has calmed somewhat today. Im thinking it is the cornflour she cant tolerate? Any feed back appreciated as to what the issue is with cornstarch. Thanks Ali
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Wednesday, June 06, 2012 - 9:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would also like to know the answer to Ali's question!
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Wednesday, June 06, 2012 - 11:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ali and Ada, to make corn starch the corn is steeped for 30 to 48 hours, which ferments it slightly. Arrowroot can be substituted as a thickener. It is also possible that she is reacting to genetically modified corn.

http://www.againstthegrainnutrition.com/newsandnotes/2009/04/14/genetically-engineered-corn-may-cause-allergies-infertility-and-disease/
jjmartin
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Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2012 - 1:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Once I tried to use corn starch for talcum powder but within about four days I was having a reaction. This was applying it to my skin!!!! So yes I stay away from corn starch modified or not. However I love corn meal and never have a problem with it.
ali
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Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2012 - 6:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On looking again at the packet it is labelled corn flour then underneath it says "starch extracted from corn" It is definitely not gmo corn. She is still not good today. It is the only new thing added to her diet, so i am 100% sure her reaction is due to the corn. The epsom salt baths have helped somewhat. She had three days of eating it before her reaction (in retrospect she did show some symptoms earlier, but she is only three and its hard sometimes to figure out what is a reaction and what is "just being three!!")but it is taking her a long time to get back on a level.
Deb A.
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Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 12:41 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sometimes enzymes are added to the soak water to separate the starch from the other parts of the corn kernel...this can free up glutamate as well.If the product is not organic, food grade sulfuric acid can be used instead to speed up the process.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 5:31 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How do you know it's not GMO? You must be in Europe. Lucky. :-) Everything is likely to be GMO unless explicitly stated otherwise!
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 5:32 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oops I meant to say "everything in the US" (that contains corn, canola, or soy)
ali
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Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 10:21 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes im in Europe. Ireland. Ive yet to find gmo corn for sale, though im sure the day will come!! Ireland is already the biggest import in europe of gmo animal feed. Eek!
ali
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Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 10:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would sulfuric acid cause a sulfite reaction? SHe is highly sensitive to sulfite and that also causes bahavioural issues with her on a par with FGA exposure.
Di
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Posted on Monday, June 11, 2012 - 3:53 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ali, I think these articles are from 2009, using the term "voluntary", do you know if this is still in effect?

In Ireland: All GM crops were banned for cultivation in 2009, and there is a voluntary labeling system for foods containing GM foods to be identified as such.
http://www.examiner.com/article/what-countries-have-banned-gmo-crops

IRELAND ADOPTS GM-FREE ZONE POLICY
DUBLIN - The Irish Government will ban the cultivation of all GM crops and introduce a voluntary GM-free label for food - including meat, poultry, eggs, fish, crustaceans, and dairy produce made without the use of GM animal feed.

The policy was adopted as part of the Renewed Programme for Government agreed between the two coalition partners, the centre-right Fianna Faíl and the Green Party, after the latter voted to support it on Saturday.

The agreement specifies that the Government will "Declare the Republic of Ireland a GM-Free Zone, free from the cultivation of all GM plants". The official text also states "To optimise Ireland's competitive advantage as a GM-Free country, we will introduce a voluntary GM-Free logo for use in all relevant product labelling and advertising, similar to a scheme recently introduced in Germany." [1]

The President of the Irish Cattle and Sheepfarmers Association, Malcolm Thompson, said he was delighted by the announcement, adding, "The Government's new GM-free policy is the fulfillment of what we at ICSA have held for the last five years. I very much look forward to its full implementation." [2]
http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_19360.cfm
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Monday, June 11, 2012 - 6:27 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A 2011 article on Ireland and GMO's:

http://www.naturalnews.com/031630_GMOs_Ireland.html
Jerry Story
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Posted on Monday, June 11, 2012 - 4:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Seems to me if GE foods are so wonderful as I imagine Monsanto would have us believe, then they ought to be eager to label them GE in order to promote them. It's normal for a company to promote its products, right? But not Monsanto.

Seems to me at least non-GE foods should be allowed to be labelled non-GE, provided of course that's the truth. Monsanto doesn't want to allow non-GE to be labelled non-GE. What the 773H does Monsanto find wrong with saying that a non-GE food is non-GE? What?! Telling the truth about a product should be against the law??

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