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Rice dextrin?

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Rice dextrin? « Previous Next »

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AdaLovelace
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Posted on Monday, October 08, 2012 - 11:02 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anyone ever heard of it? Any comments? It's an ingredient in some gluten free cookies I purchased today... ;)

I know processed stuff like this isn't great, but I wonder if it could contain free glutamate?

Thanks!
ali
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Posted on Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - 7:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i cant see where you say what the ingredient is Ada.
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - 9:00 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rice contains some glutamate, naturally, but not nearly as much as say, wheat or soy. Yes, it is a highly processed sugar or starch made from rice. Manufacturers use different methods to isolate substance from the original material...some more natural than others....enzymes, bacteria, chemicals... to break down the rice or whatever, to isolate what they need.
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - 9:03 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wikipedia says it's a carbohydrate made from starches (rice starch) broken down by enzymes or by heat and acids (chemicals).
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - 6:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ali the ingredient in question is rice dextrin. Thanks Deb for the info! :-)
ali
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Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 - 7:43 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks Ada. Ive wondered about that ingredient too. But given we cant tolerate maltodextrin, the word dextrin rightly or wrongly made me avoid it.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Thursday, October 11, 2012 - 6:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think it's safer than maltodextrin, but it's not something I would want to eat every day. One more question--is "yeast culture" safe in food or pet food? I'm looking for a MSG free pet food. I found this brand called Nature's Logic.

Check out the ingredients in the cat food:
Rabbit, Water Sufficient for Processing, Turkey Liver, Dried Egg Product, Porcine Plasma, Montmorillonite Clay, Cottage Cheese, Cod Liver Oil, Egg Shell Meal, Brewers Dried Yeast, Dried Apple, Dried Apricot, Alfalfa Meal, Dried Artichoke, Dried Blueberry, Dried Broccoli, Dried Carrot, Dried Chicory Root, Dried Cranberry, Dried Kelp, Parsley, Dried Pumpkin, Rosemary, Dried Spinach, Dried Tomato.

Sounds pretty fantastic to me! The dried food contains "yeast culture," so I just need to figure out if that is safe. The other two varieties of canned foods do contain "broth," so I have already written the company to see if they will disclose the ingredients in the broth. One thing that I find amazing is they don't use any synthetic vitamins in their products. Here is the full product page: http://www.natureslogic.com/products/cp_can_ra.html
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Thursday, October 11, 2012 - 7:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My mom found this food. She also found some helpful information regarding labeling for pet food. The laws are different. For example, did you know that hydrolyzed protein doesn't even have to be labeled in pet food?!
LisaS
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Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 11:37 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It seems to be at least added for a different purpose than flavor:
http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/hrs3184

Although this says the opposite:
http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=badingredients

I'm sure it has glutamate in it; anything produced with yeast and then dried probably does. The question is, how much and is it worth the other benefits?

Lisa
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 1:06 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well the reason I ask is that brewer's yeast or "regular" yeast doesn't have the issue of being high in free glutamate (as far as I know)... right?

The company wrote back to me today saying that "the broth is made from cooking the specific meat or poultry in water. For example, chicken broth is made from cooking chicken in boiling water to create chicken broth." Woohoo! :-)
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 1:07 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So I'm just trying to differentiate between brewer's yeast and autolyzed yeast and now "yeast culture" to see what kind of yeast that is...
Deb A.
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Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 1:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Brewers yeast is rich in glutamate. Autolyzed yeast and yeast culture are processed to create more protein and flavor in a product..mostly the latter. They are made using enzymes, bacteria or chemicals to isolate the protein part of the yeast. Am not sure, but brewers yeast is a by-product of beer making...know it is high in B vitamins, proteins, and glutamate.
Deb A.
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Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 1:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Found online:

Nutritional brewer’s yeast
Commercial, nutritional brewer’s yeast is inactive yeast
(dead yeast cells with no leavening power), remaining
after the brewing process. Brewer’s yeast is produced by
cultivation of S. cerevisiae on malted barley, separated
after the wort fermentation, debittered and dried. It is
an excellent source of protein and it is used as a nutrient
supplement rich in B vitamins.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Saturday, October 13, 2012 - 5:06 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Deb. The different kinds of yeast are a bit confusing. Especially when you figure that a lot of people (especially people that eat "health food" or follow a vegan or vegetarian diet) use yeast extract in order to supplement vitamins into their diet. :|

Nature's Logic got back to me regarding my question about their ingredient, "yeast culture". I asked if they were using it as a flavor enhancer. They said this:

"Yeast cultures are a food yeast full of natural B Vitamins. We do not use synthetic vitamins which can be toxic, so we use the food yeast to cover the required B vitamins. We use the entire yeast cell that is cultured/grown. Yeast extract is removing the yeast cell wall and using the extract to create flavorings and other applications."

They are awesome!!! :-) Can't wait to get my kitties on this stuff!
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 - 11:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All yeasts are rich in glutamate, naturally. Let us know how your kitties do.
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 - 11:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I will. If anyone has any better recommendations for pet food let me know, but this is the best I've found thus far. Ladytron has blood in her urine and I'm trying my best to help her! <3
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 2:05 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pet food ingredients to avoid:

http://www.halopets.com/pet-education/ingredients-to-avoid.html

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