Topics Topics Edit Profile Profile Help/Instructions Help    
Search Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Traveling Abroad, advice?

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Traveling Abroad, advice? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 8:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We are about to embark on a wonderful 7 week trip abroad. We are mostly staying in apartments where I can prepare our own meals. The one week we stay in a hotel I have been e-mail the head chef (it is a high end place). I found a very nice organic whole food store just blocks away from that. tho everything is closed on Sunday, the day we arrive. I am trying to get some bread delivered to the Hotel.
We are going to be in Ireland (Dublin area) for 2 weeks, then Finland for 1 week.
We then head to visit family in The Netherlands. My father in law worked as a chemist in the food industry for many years and they are already thinking of safe foods for my son before we arrive (this is wonderful!!- so I feel very good about the 3 weeks we will be there).
We end our trip in Brussels at an apartment, again where I can prepare foods.
Just wanting any experience and/or advice for those who travel.
It is our 9 yr old that has the very bad reactions (seizure like mood swings- crazy! and depression and anxiety). For the trip over I can make sandwiches and bring Larabars for him. Keep him of just water and fruit like bananas at the airports. It is going to be keeping him full during the airplane travels I am mostly worried about . . .please share (for me and others!)
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 11:02 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, i live in Ireland and lived in Holland for twelve years. Will you be cooking for yourself in Ireland? If so you are fortunate to be in the Dublin area as outside of Dublin it can be pretty hard to find organic foods. There is an organic butcher in Dublin. For bread, stay clear of anything prebaked here. Most supermarkets stock Polish bread.Its not organic but has just the basic ingredients of flour, water, yeast, salt, sugar and oil. No nasties and its pretty tasty too.

Holland is a lot easier if you are near a big town or city. Most have a mini supermarket that is just organic with a butcher inhouse. I lived close to Haarlem. Their organic store is called De Gimsel. Im not sure if this is a chain or individual store.
For the airport i would take the fruit and water approach. Thats what i do with my kids.
Let me know where in Holland you are staying and if i know the area i can maybe make some suggestions.
Also if you are cooking for yourself in Dublin let me know and i will dig out the butchers address for you and any other stores there.
Good luck
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 11:04 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh i just remembered that before we left Holland/Nederland in 2005 the big chain supermarket Albert Hein had issued a policy statement saying that within five years they would offer an organic alternative to every item on the shelf. Im unsure as to wether this came to fruition but can recommend the store as having a good organic selection of fruit and veg.
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, April 12, 2012 - 12:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ali,
Oh- I want to know more about my options in IE. We will be in Dun Loaghaire (The Royal Marine Hotel) for our first week. There is an organic store not far from there. I am not having much luck with the head chef at the hotel for food advice. What do you know about that area?
When in Dublin we are staying in an apartment for a week where I can cook my own food. The area we are is Rathmines. If you have any advice for that area I'd appreciate that. Are food additives listed by name or EU # there?
When we are in NL we are fine. There is a rather large store in my family's town that is a natural grocery store, they have just upgraded from a vitamin store. My family is already investigating the right foods for us. We usually shop at AH though this is our first 'educated' visit.
I'm a little lost about Finland though. I would assume they list by EU#, and I hope that the local bakers can help me with bread. Cheese will be find and fruits and veggies. I can get something made from that!
if you want to send me e-mail off line you can use my username at my yahoo address. I might stalk you to get all the advice I can!!!! Thank you.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, April 13, 2012 - 11:52 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Email: johndowney@organicfoodsireland.com
Address: 97 Terenure Rd Terenure Dub 6
Phone: (01) 4909 239
Fax: (01) 4901 522
Open: Mon - Sat, 8:30am to 5:30pm
Wed, 8:30am to 1:00pm
This is the address and contact details for the organic butcher in Dublin centre. Its easily accessible from Rathmines.
Most supermarkets offer a range of organic fruit and veg(except tesco) but its limited.

Lidl supermarket :-
some organic fruit and veg.
organic tomato ketchup(this is really tasty, my kids love it and have zero reaction to it),
pasta and spaghetti,
organic minced meat (i think you call this ground beef?)
Free range (not organic but we do good with it)chickens and chicken fillets.The regular lidl chickens give me migrains as do anyones regular chickens but i find im good with lidl free range though not other free range!)

eggs
coffee (only organic instant coffee ive ever found and its good! :-))
milk,
yoghurt.
For organic lidl would be my choice of regular supermarket but they by no means have everything!!

Tesco :-
organic olive oil,
organic balsamic vinegar,
organicweetabix( a wheat cereal for breakfast which my kids do great with),
heinz organic beans,
organic eggs
milk

Supervalu:- (not very good for organic here but maybe better in Dublin??)
some organic fruit and veg
organic milk
polish bread

If you see a polish shop get their bread. The supermarket bread is terrible. Its full of nasties. I once counted twenty ingredients in a loaf...eek! :-(

As regards your unhelpful chef. Well i can only say that that is consistant wiht my experience here in Ireland! We just dont really eat out. I find they will look you in the eye and tell you that something is cooked from scratch but it rarely is. If we do eat out, we find italians much more open about what is in their food and happy to show us their ingredients labels, Indian restraunts are happy to accomodate and show you ingredients lists, and if you find a Greek restaraunt you should be just fine,but always check.
If we want a quick snack we find the fish and chip shops are safe enough on chips. Check they use sunflower oil not rapeseeed as canola is known here. Only get chips though the rest is processed. But just for walk on the beach with chips as a mid day snack is really nice and you come to no real harm but maybe not to good on the waistline ;) hehe.

I wish i could offer you more help with your chef but all i can really say is to tread very carefully and order very plainly...forget any idea about having a sauce on anything!! Boulion or stock cubes are pretty much in everything!!

Ive jsut found and organic supermarket that isnt too far from Dun Laoghaire. I order on line and have deliveries from this store (spices and herbs mainly) but have never visited their shop.
Here are the contact details. You should find everythign you could possible need under one roof here!! :-) But i would say its more expensive than say lidl!
The Organic Supermarket,
2c Main Street, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland
T:01 278 1111E:contact@organicsupermarket.ie

I hope this helps somewhat so that you have a happy healthy stay in Ireland
Ali
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2012 - 4:58 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For the plane, we often just eat snacks. Cashews, chips, carrots, trail mix, cheese (if you buy cheap ice packs and make sure they are well-frozen, they often go through security without an issue. I've never had one thrown out but I know others have). Bringing your own granola is a good option to have on hand when you can't find other stuff, because most places have whole milk.

At Vitamin Cottage, there are some yummy "junk" food in the raw section -- pricey though.

And as I mention before, we do prophylactic ibuprofen twice a day on vacation, usually.

(I'm just now finding out how much the supplements we give our son are helping...because now I'm much more sensitive than him. We ate Peeps the other day...awful headache. I could have been something else. He's had gelatin before without issue but it's been high-quality gelatin (Great Lakes, which tests for FGA). Anyway, I would suggest you bring magnesium glycninate or citrate, taurine, PS choline, Vit K if you have it, Vit C supplements). For me the magnesium -- 2 every 4 hours -- has been working as well as ibuprofen (usually I need both the day after exposure).

Have fun on your trip!!! Just remember, you can deal with this...meltdowns aren't fun but they aren't the end of the world, either. After all you've dealt with them for a long time. Be careful, but don't ruin your vacation worrying too much.
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2012 - 4:59 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

(I edited this but forgot to refresh...sorry for the duplicate).

For the plane, we often just eat snacks. Cashews, chips, carrots, trail mix, cheese (if you buy cheap ice packs and make sure they are well-frozen, they often go through security without an issue. I've never had one thrown out but I know others have). Bringing your own granola is a good option to have on hand when you can't find other stuff, because most places have whole milk.

At Vitamin Cottage, there are some yummy "junk" food in the raw section -- pricey though.

And as I mention before, we do prophylactic ibuprofen twice a day on vacation, usually.

(I'm just now finding out how much the supplements we give our son are helping...because now I'm much more sensitive than him. We ate Peeps the other day...awful headache. I could have been something else. He's had gelatin before without issue but it's been high-quality gelatin (Great Lakes, which tests for FGA). Anyway, I would suggest you bring magnesium glycninate or citrate, taurine, PS choline, Vit K if you have it, Vit C supplements). For me the magnesium -- 2 every 4 hours -- has been working as well as ibuprofen (usually I need both the day after exposure).

Have fun on your trip!!! Just remember, you can deal with this...meltdowns aren't fun but they aren't the end of the world, either. After all you've dealt with them for a long time. Be careful, but don't ruin your vacation worrying too much.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2012 - 11:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I dont know how much you guys pay for ibuprofen but if you go to Holland before coming to Ireland stock up there as its half the price! Also, i find it very difficult to get clean supplements here. You may have more luck in Dublin ( i live out in the country in Cavan).But i would strongly recommend that you bring your own tried and tested brands with you.
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, April 16, 2012 - 6:01 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Ali, we head to Dun Laoghaire then Dublin, then Finland then NL and lastly Burssels on our trip, so I will bring items with me.
I just heard back from the head chef from the hotel and he says they use "Irish baking flour". I listed several things and that the flour needs to be 100% whole wheat. Can you tell me what "Irish Baking flour" is? Is it safe?
I also found a bagel store (it is a chain) and they say they import their wheat from America- so we will not be going there!! In NL we have much more possibilities for good healthy foods.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - 10:16 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Irish baking flour i would presume to be just plain flour. But im uncertain. It must be a catering term for bulk buys as i havent seen it in the shops. We have the usual flours plain, self raising, cream flour. All are "improved" aside from the cheaper non brand flours that are just flour (strange but true!) Personally i only use organic flours. Which is something i forgot to mention to you. I cant find organic flour in regular supermarkets only in health stores. Most health stores stock dove-farm organic flours at a reasonable price.The reaon i steer clear of conventional flour and wheat products ie pasta(all supermarkets stock organic pasta) is that our wheat crops are systematically sprayed with round up seven days before harvesting to aid the drying process (madness!!)
Another thing i forgot to mention was that we have issues with a lot of imported fruits.Especially American raspberries. They send my daughter on a really bad reaction. I suspect sulfites? Same with kiwis. She can eat the insides but not the skins (she is three and seems to like kiwi skin...most odd!)
If i think of anything else of help ill let you know.
Oh nearly forgot, if i cant get organic flour i stick to the cheapest unbranded flours (usually supermarket own brand) as they are just flour and not improved.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - 10:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just thought i have a friend who buys bulk for her catering business. I will be seeing her tomorrow and will check if she has Irish baking flour and see can i peak a look at the packaging.
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 9:08 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Ali, I mapped out the Lidl stores, one is a block away from our accommodations in Dublin.
The hotel manager has been much more helpful for us, they will get someone to get bread for us for Sunday arrival.
any advice is MOST appreciated!!! thank you!!
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 9:48 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You are very welcome. Hope you have a lovely safe stay in Ireland.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 9:51 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

just to say that at this time of year organic potatoes are hard to come by but lidl still have them in stock. Both tesco and supervalu dont have them this time of year.
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2012 - 8:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just heard back from some people in Helsinki, Finland. Seems organic natural foods (the real kind) is common there. As it was put it is popular among city dwellers. So if the public demands it they will get it. I've been hoping that this would be the case. I was given a list of natural grocery stores and reassured that wheat is usually unchanged from its natural product.
there is a chin now in The Netherlands http://www.ekoplaza.nl/ that have organic, they call it Biologishe (biological) foods. My in-laws are looking for us to see if it fits our needs. Optimistic about our trip and keeping my son healthy!
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2012 - 9:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wanted to add that I heard from a store in Dun Laoghaire called, The Art of Eating, and they have worked with the hotel to get the best choice bread based on the information I gave them. Can't wait to report back. I have also heard back from the grocery store in Helsinki and they will be working with me at the store for options. I am so pleased at the help I am getting. I do admit to saying, "my son has a metabolic disorder" which I think makes the seriousness more emphasized! And while a depressed 9 yr old may not seem like a bad reaction in some books, it is huge in our books because it is altering the brain of a developing person!! We depart our home in less than 24 hours and our new adventure begins!!!
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2012 - 10:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi there. I hope you are having a wonderful safe trip. Id hoped to message reply before you set off, but i see you are probably already en-route. Good luck and i hope you enjoy Europe and keep your son safe x
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2012 - 10:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I love all this information about traveling. It's very informative especially since I hope to go to Europe again soon. I am writing to tell everyone that I've survived two three day music festivals in the past month. The festivals last all day and you can't really come and go. I was able to sneak in my own food. I really had to get creative, especially since at one point I was denied entrance and had to sneak past the security guards. Haha. However in the future I am wondering perhaps I could be a little more careful and bring a doctor's note?
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, April 23, 2012 - 7:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For example... what if you go to a place such as Disneyland where you plan on being there all day?
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, April 23, 2012 - 10:20 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have been talking about this scenario with summer approaching and planning a few daytrips out with the kids. We will be phoning ahead and if our food isnt allowed with us through the turnstyles we wont be going. Its a nightmare.
Well done on the safe music festivals!Im green with envy both on the safe eating front and the getting to three day music festivals!!! We took our eldest to Glastonbury when he was small. Sadly we cant afford to take all three!!
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 3:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most places do not allow food. The only thing I can think of is a doctor's note, but I don't like to create a fuss or a scene (plus I'm not sure if that would even fly). I figure sneaking it is easier for me right now. However it can be difficult when you are checked very stringently! I'm a bit of a nonconformist so I suppose it works out for me. :-) I don't want to miss out on any experiences. :-)
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 4:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My son is thinking of doing a summer camp this year for a week...it will be interesting. I do think he can bring some of his own food, though, and they list a large number of diets that they do support, so at least it isn't typical cafeteria food. I have to talk with the director and find out if he can use a microwave, since he doesn't eat much cold food at lunch/dinner usually.
Hoteru
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 2:28 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi AdaLovelace,
You mentioned going to Europe and I have no information on that but in the U.S. if you carry a letter from your doctor stating for medical reasons that you are only capable of eating what you bring in yourself the facility will probably not give you any problems. It becomes an ADA matter ( Americans with Disablities Act) and since there have been so many widely publicised suits most companies will do anything to avoid trouble
Also I believe it is against the law for them to ask you what your disability is since it implies discrimation based on kind of disability.
I haven't had any trouble because I just tell places I have "major food allergies" and
1. If don't eat my own food soon I might faint, which has happened to me.
2. If I eat their food I will be throwing up all over within 15 to 20 minutes. Then I just smile and say something like neither one of us will enjoy that and I'm just here to have a nice time. Well, I have thrown up within 15 to 20 minutes from getting msg in food unsuspectingly. When the person at the gate thinks about my throwing up all over his gate area they usually change their objections fast.
Anyone else have information about
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, April 27, 2012 - 4:37 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Im writting from Ireland...all is going well. I found a chain store called Marks and Spencer that has many options for us. We've gone 6for days without incident. Today our son is a bit low but not sure if he is just tired or ate something. So happy with the responses from restaurants and grocery stores with helping keep him safe. Keeping with Marks and Spencer for food this next week while in IE.!
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, April 28, 2012 - 4:31 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So happy to hear you are finding the food you need to stay safe here in Ireland. Enjoy your stay. Ive never shopped in M and Spencers food hall. Ill be sure to check it out sometime soon. Have a great vacation.
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2012 - 2:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

another reaction today. We are eating with family that I hoped would be doing some of the research for me, but I fear I will have to police more.
Here, the Netherlands, they have citric acid in more items that I think in the US!
So far Ireland and Finland have been easier then in The Netherlands for finding foods. No Ice-cream in the bigger store nor the biological store. Possibly the bread from the baker, my mother in law did the investigating for me not myself . . .bummer.
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2012 - 4:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The problem is carageenen...in whipped creme. As much as I thought I could count on others......I cannot. But now they get to share the results with us for the rest of the week.
Ali...any suggestions for toetje/ dessert here in NL?
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2012 - 8:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sadly people sometimes just dont believe there is a problem until they have to witness it. I once had a good friend i thought was onside that brought my son home two hours into a playdate in a terrible state. Tearful, aggressive etc etc. She did have the good grace to tell me she had given him sweets because she actually thought it was in my head!!!!
Toetje in Nederland.....its been a while since i lived there. I do remember that most of the dairy has carageenen in , even the childrens yogis(sort of fromage frais deserts) . Natural yoghurt and fresh fruit sweetened with honey always goes down well with my kids. I remember the biologische shop had a good selection of sweets/candy with natural food colourings....Pancakes are pretty easy to make from eggs, flour and milk, a quick desert with lemon juice and sugar. Or maybe popcorn for a snack. I bough kelkin popcorn there and made it myself either in a pan or microwave for two minutes in a paper bag. The bakery in Holland was a no go for us. But the bakery in the biologishe store was good with clear labelling of ingredients. I basically always cook from scratch, so im not much use on suggesting ready made deserts as i gave up on them long ago. Stewed apples with sugar,cinnamon and raisons (how do you sp that???)is nice with natural yoghurt and pretty quick to make....
Citric acid is in just about every prepacked/tinned item as you say.
I hope he soon recovers from his reaction and you can enjoy the rest of your stay.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2012 - 9:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just remembered what else i did for bread. There are a lot of Polish living in Nederland and they have their own polish stores that stock polish bread. Its just basic ingredients flour, yeast, salt,sugar,oil and water. We did great with that both in Nederland and Ireland.
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 3:04 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

wanting to know of a good Dutch website for FGA information. My sister in law is asking, it is too much for her to try to understand the English websites.
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 6:34 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here are a couple:

http://nl.hicow.com/mononatriumglutamaat/smaak/levensmiddelenadditief-2787870.html

http://winworld.forum2go.nl/vrij-van-glutamaatzuur-msg-t1617.html
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 6:41 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is a complete English translation of the Dutch text in the second website:

"MSG is in the body into y-aminobutyric acid, a substance which certain nerve centers in the brains blocks. In the body, this substance is degraded by mono-amine oxidase, leaving a balance is maintained. By use of medication (MAO inhibitors) or hypersensitivity to glutamic acid personality changes can occur, such as tantrums, schizophrenia and apathy. MSG competes with other neurotransmitter substances causing the production of acetylcholine (another neurotransmitter) is increased, leading to neurological and behavioral symptoms such as hyperactivity. MSG should not be used in infant formula for babies under 3 months. It dissolves easily in water, the solution is neutral. As a flavor enhancer, it is only effective at a pH of 5 to 8, in protein-rich food products and in the presence of sodium chloride. It is usually used in amounts of 0.2 to 0.5%. Higher concentrations give a sweet taste. With a mixture of 95% monosodium glutamate and 5% sodium inosinate ten times as strong an effect is obtained.


Monosodium glutamate of Conimex

Because monosodium glutamate is a flavor enhancer is often used in the food, especially in Chinese restaurants. The complaints after visiting a restaurant often resemble food poisoning. Often, however, there is a hypersensitivity reaction to monosodium glutamate. Usually caused the intake of more than 5 grams of complaints. The quantity Ve-tsin that cause symptoms is often different for each individual. The complaints are known as "Chinese restaurant syndrome 'or Kwok` s disease. People who are sensitive to this substance can develop problems such as pressure in the face, headache, chest pain and a burning sensation in various parts of the body, general feeling of malaise, gastrointestinal complaints, tachycardia, and tingling. MSG is added to various products you may be taking. Canned soups and suit, bouillon, broth, potato chips, savory snacks, ready-prepared meals, spice mixes, Oriental dishes, particularly meats and salt substitutes, known as low-sodium products.

The glutamate acid in protein foods is called L-glutamine, glutamic this causes no symptoms of nerve or other side effects. The unbound form of the D-glutamate and glutamate does not occur naturally in higher organisms. However, we find this form in the cell wall of the aforementioned bacteria Micrococcus glutamicus. At the end of 1800 and early 1900 they began producing free glutamic acid, D-glutamic acid. This form caused by animals in laboratories damage to the brains and in humans causes skin problems, heart palpitations, depression and epilepsy. D-glutamic acid is also added to pesticides and fertilizers. This allows residues in our food and our plates arrive. It is not strange that someone at the store one time and sometimes react negatively to the same kind of lettuce has no complaints. The cause probably lies in the use of fertilizers and / or pesticide on the vegetables.

The FDA is by definition that MSG is a natural product because, as mentioned earlier, occurs naturally in certain foods. Where people do not talk about is the difference between 'natural' and 'in natural form. " The MSG that is used in the food is not in its natural form. The term "natural" is therefore very misleading.

MSG may occur in processed foods, food supplements, diet products, cosmetics and medicines. It can be used on fresh fruit and vegetables, in pesticides, fungicides, fertilizers and growth promoters for plants. It can long remain in the edible portion of the plant such as leaves, fruits, nuts and grains. MSG is found in plant products AuxiGro, the products are all approved because the MSG in the product is "natural". In 1997 when these products hit the market, people had different ziekteverschijnselenna eating lettuce or strawberries sprayed or whose land had been treated with AuxiGro.

The annoying thing about this whole MSG thing is that you as a consumer can never be sure that a product really MSG-free. Several products that are advertised as "free from MSG," "no added MSG 'and' no MSG ', do contain MSG. As you already may have read above there are several names of MSG or other glutamate and the important thing is that MSG is still considered 'natural' is aangeprijsd. In a restaurant, this problem is even greater because there is the cook or buyer less attention to the hidden form of monosodium glutamate, then when you do buy and read the label carefully before using this product in your shopping cart places. Even in 'natural' products can MSG occur. The designations, which is used, "Hydrolyzed soy protein" or hydrolyzed soy protein, you will not arouse suspicion.

For the people who are sensitive or allergic to MSG, there are two neurotoxic (damaging to the nerves) amino acids present in foods are used. These two amino acids L-cysteine ​​and aspartic `` acid. Aspartaatzuur found in the sugar substitutes "neotame" and "aspartame." L-cysteine ​​is usually used in flour products. As a consumer you should ask or look for products carrying the words "free glutamate acid. The seller who is aware of MSG, prefers to talk about products that are 'free glutamate acid' in place of saying that monosodium glutamate in the product is processed. The American names such as autolyzed yeast, Hydrolyzed pea protein, carrageenan, Sodium Caseinate, enzymes and a host of other lesser known names means that the product contains acid or free glutamate that during production there has arisen.

Do you really want to cook your food completely safe, use different herbs that are also a great taste to the food business. Besides what's wrong with eating real fresh chicken or vegetable soup?"
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 7:31 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.smaakversterkers.eu/info/producten_msg.html
This link should take you to a list of products that definately contain msg....
http://www.smaakversterkers.eu/artikelen/msg.html
and this is from the same site and explains the problem with msg...hope this helps.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, May 20, 2012 - 7:33 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The second link also gives a list of hidden msg names. It is practically the same list that Deb A has in her book...Get your sister in law to write it out and check labels....
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 28, 2012 - 10:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you for the links. She lives in Belgium and has been very helpful.
I am very suspicious of the bread here. While my son had a full blown reaction to cargeenen, he is still not 100% himself and all I can think is the bread.
I went to the biological/organic store here. Even their breads contained extracts and whiteners. A gal there said it is really a shame that they do it. The GF breads have more crap in them to fluff them up.
She suggested I try to fine some bread from a company called Zonnelied. It is produced within biking distance from me but I could not find them. A good bit of driving on farm roads here in Zeewolde. I will be in Amsterdam Wednesday and look there for some.
I will pass on all the links!
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2012 - 2:21 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

see if you can find a polish shop for bread. My eldest couldnt tolerate any bread in Holland but the polish bread. I do know we have laws here in Ireland that enforce fortifying all white flours with B vitamins and i forget what else, even organic white flours. That may be an issue with the dutch flour too. As much as i hate that they do this here, we thankfully do tolerate the add ons in the organic flour okay. But i use very little white flour. You are right about the gf breads, the labels for the flour blends for this are horrendous!
I hope your son is soon better.
And im very jealous you will be in Amsterdam. I miss Amsterdam!! :-(
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2012 - 6:53 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm home now.
My observations:
Ireland was very helpful and kind. The Marks and Spencer grocery store had many safe options and the stores we visited were very willing to look up ingredients and help us. We stayed the 2nd week in the south of Rathmines and there were several organic stores for us to work with and loved the selections, even chocolate muffins! A wonderful store in Dublin called Natural that was friendly and helpful.

Helsinki Finland. The people of Finland demand better quality for themselves so finding safe food was again very easy. Finding safe breads was all over, including chocolate muffins! I did not need to interact with the people very much, they do label food products well. It is not necessary to read Finnish, but creative interpretation might be useful. Stockmann's grocery store is full of safe products, in store breads and wonderful selection of cheese. We never ate out, so I can't say anything about that.

The Netherlands. I thought this would be my easiest experience and was sadly disappointed. Even at the Biological Stores "Ekoplaza" were the breads filled with yeast extract and many other fillers and colorings. It was a lot of label reading, and not always was it easy to decipher. Our son was moody nearly the entire 3 week we were there, so always some exposure even with trying to keep his diet clean. the Albert Heijn has a line of biological products I found safe and at a very good cost, even a whipping cream we could use.

Belgium- a great experience. Hagen Daz has a restaurant with waffles and ice-cream, even fresh cream that is safe! Food Factory (looks and sounds like crappy food) was safe for pizza and pasta. No problems even eating street food (waffles). They were not always so happy to help, but they would if pushed. Don't take the eye rolls too personal.

I came to some odd unfounded conclusion that croissants were generally a safe choice when you can't ask about the ingredients. I think because they are difficult to make outside of basic ingredients. So we ate a lot of them. We found this to be true for our son.

AirPlane food- completely out of the question, and don't bring fruit on the plane back to the US unless you like to go through more security checks.

All in all- a great experience and encourage others to get out there and experience food abroad~! We have only been at this for 4 months before we headed out and only once did I find it exhausting, but my 9 year old stepped up the plate and took responsibility for himself and would ask too!
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2012 - 8:28 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow, that sounds quite a trip!! I know first hand the horrors of food in Holland. Im happy to hear that Albert Heijn had its eco range up and running. When we left Holland seven years ago, they had pledged that within five years they would have an organic version of all their products available at comparative cost. I forgot about croissants. My son used to always eat criossants if we were on the go in Holland. Most were okay, but not all.

Glad you had a positive experience for the most part and enjoyed your holiday.

I must check out Marks and Spencers when im in the city next. What products did you find safe in there?
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2012 - 1:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Glad you got to try the waffles from street vendors in Belgium. They're a real treat and I miss them. I've had what they called "Belgian Waffles" elsewhere, but they're not the same and don't compare.
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2012 - 4:17 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Welcome back!!

We've found criossants to be the best choice at buffets or church potlucks here too, whenever faced with limited choices. I should remind my son of that before his camp this year, though it's unlikely they'll have them. (I need to call the chef at the center...sigh. It's on my list).
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, June 11, 2012 - 2:23 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

good to hear you agree on the croissants!
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, January 26, 2013 - 12:12 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does anyone have any tips for London and Berlin? Restaurants? Grocery stores? Specific food items? Any information would be greatly appreciated! I'm planning on spending two weeks in Europe, and it will be my first time out the country since I started my healthy lifestyle!
Dutchbabiesx2
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, March 30, 2013 - 2:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ada,
call ahead, call, ask for ingredients, be kind about requesting the list, make up a quick line about why. I say my son has a metabolic disorder and cant metabolize particular foods, this seems just enough info for people to help.

maybe they have Marks and Spencers in London?? Higher end restaurants would more likely make things from scratch (no low budget vacations unfortunately).

good luck, have fun if you did not already head out.
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, March 31, 2013 - 12:18 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you Dutchbabiesx2 for the advice! I won't be eating out. I'll mostly just be purchasing some things from markets. :-)

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Post as "Anonymous"
Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Administration Administration Log Out Log Out   Previous Page Previous Page Next Page Next Page