Topics Topics Edit Profile Profile Help/Instructions Help    
Search Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Vinegar on the Test Diet

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Vinegar on the Test Diet « Previous Next »

Author Message
KMGood
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2011 - 1:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi everyone! Would vinegar (any kind) be safe to use on the test diet? It would help making salad dressing easier.

Thanks!
Kristen
sara
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2011 - 2:31 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I found I probably react to all vinegars. Some have luck with organic apple cider. I tried it and also tried a couple of balsamic vinegars (one organic, one not) and ended up not using any for now. I think some suggest using lemon juice.

Oh I did the "test diet" back in early Dec I think it was and still trying to figure out what is and isn't safe. I am getting plainer and plainer all the time - plain chicken, plain potato (reacted to some I think), plain veggies etc.
Jerry Story
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2011 - 2:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vinegar is poison.

I use white vinegar to dissolve deposits in my steamer.
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2011 - 2:43 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I agree, vinegar is tough. Lemon works well as a replacement.
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, May 07, 2011 - 9:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

jerry's comment is on target for "distilled white vinegar" aka (more truthfully) Acetic Acid- no one should be putting that stuff in their body:
http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/chemweek/pdf/aceticacid.pdf
..."For many years, the bulk of commercial acetic acid was produced by the oxidation of ethanol. Today, most
industrial production of acetic acid is by the Monsanto process, in which carbon monoxide reacts with methanol under
the influence of a rhodium complex catalyst at 180EC and pressures of 3040 atm..."


YUMMY. no wonder the whole inside of my mouth peels if i accidentally eat anything made with conventional "vinegar"! (ie potluck potato salad-oops)
works great as a degreasing cleaner tho- my those glasses are sparkly :-)

i would also recommend using caution with Balsamic Vinegars, both red & white are derived from wine grapes which (tho delicious) are too frequently EXTREMELY high in Fluorides due to toxic modern farming practices. i have discovered that more than to msg, i am highly sensitive to fluorides- my body no longer tolerates any grape products unless homegrown in clean soil.
plus, recently a lot of the 'flavored' vinegars are no longer actually flavored with spices but with so-called "natural flavoring"... don't believe the label, that stuff is politically protected poison. nothing natural about it except the word.

there are 2 vinegars i have found consistently safe and even beneficial for everyone in my family: Rice Vinegar provided it is made the old-fashioned way (so far we do well with trader joes & i also used to buy nakano) and "With the Mother" (=raw/unfiltered) Apple Cider Vinegar (ie Braggs and a few other OG brands)

of course not everyone on this board is able to tolerate even those... as we all have highly individual body chemistry & sensitivities... you will need to experiment carefully to find your own tolerance level.
and di's suggestion to skip it & just use lemon is good too.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2011 - 12:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do fine with organic apple cider vinegar and of course, fresh lemon juice...which you can freeze in ice cube trays, remove and put in freezer bags, if you decide to squeeze a lot.
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 5:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I reacted to even Bragg's ACV in the beginning, but as I began to heal, I found I could tolerate it just fine. It is still the only vinegar that I can eat and just being in the same room with white vinegar will make me react.
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 69.151.64.197
Posted on Friday, March 01, 2013 - 7:58 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What about vinegar in mustard?
Deb A
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 05, 2013 - 7:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If the mustard is organic, the vinegar will not contain sulfites and will be organic, too.
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, March 11, 2013 - 12:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've read that even organic wine has sulfites, because the grapes pull it out of the soil. It doesn't have nearly as much because they aren't allowed to add extra. So organic vinegar will have some sulfites, just not very much.

I react to organic wine, particularly white which has the most sulfites naturally. It could be the flouride, I never knew about that!

That said, I've never reacted to vinegar like I do to even a 1/2 glass of wine.
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, March 11, 2013 - 10:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's funny you mention that Lisa, because I had just been on a quest to find low fluoride wine. What I came up with is that we should be buying organic varieties, preferably NOT from California in order to reduce fluoride exposure. I bought some organic wine from Italy from Trader Joe's for just $5.99 a bottle.
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 7:26 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Though I would love to have a wine that I don't react to ever (part of the issue is that I sometimes react and sometimes don't which really hurts the willpower, because my brain seems to be an eternal optimist), I've basically switched my (already low) alcohol consumption to Skyy Vodka.

When I was reacting very badly to all alcohol but was going to a festival that I would feel a bit "unfairly left out", I decided to experiment. I talked to a liquor store owner about the vodkas. I tried a potato (awful reaction), a freeze-distilled cherry (bad reaction), and Skyy which claims to have the best filtration around. I didn't and never have reacted to the Skyy, plus they have awesome all-natural flavors without any sugar. I've tried plain, Dragonfruit and Ginger and both are good but I prefer the Ginger. I only drink at all a couple times a month at a women's group, but love being able to have something, and Skyy rocks.
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 12:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow that is great to know! I order vodka sometimes at bars to try to reduce exposure to other, more unhealthy cocktails, so I'm stoked to know that Skyy is safe.
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 12:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do have a question though about flavored vodkas (or flavored anything, for that matter). The ingredients used to create the flavors are a big question mark--were you able to find out what exactly they use to make the dragon fruit and ginger flavors?
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 7:40 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If Skyy is safe enough, it could be used to make a safer vanilla extract. I heard it's easy to make...just add the split vanilla beans and let steep for 3 months in a closet, I think. Don't know measurements, though.
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 199.208.239.141
Posted on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 9:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

greetings, I believe I have reacted to vinegar--it was the only "unsafe" item I'd eaten (other than the salad greens, which I admit are possibly suspect...rinsed with who knows what).

Is vinegar as a rule high in free-glutamate? I haven't seen it on any of the "hidden names lists" or otherwise referred to as "naturally high" (e.g., tomatoes, mushrooms, parmesan).

Continued thanks!
SK
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 2:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Re: Skyy -- I only investigated to read on their website that they use all natural ingredients for flavoring. There is no coloring.

Re: vinegar, it's high in sulfites and many of us react to those similarly. Also, salad greens at some places, notably the Whole Foods Salad Bar, are sprayed with a sulfite solution so it could be the greens for sure.
Jennifer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2013 - 1:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was reading the other day in a Wine Country magazine for tourists (I happen to live in "Wine Country") that there is a difference between organic and 100% organic wine. 100% organic wine should have the label "No detectable sulfites". Organic wine may or may not have higher levels, but it's never added for preservation to the end product. I do OK with 100% organic, not as well with the regular organic. There is something about wine that packs a punch and two glasses are about all I can tolerate, and not because of the alcohol.

I also do well with Grey Goose vodka. It's top shelf and the flavor is almost tolerable. It's probably delicious as far as vodka goes.

My drink of choice is sake, but none of the plum or flavored versions. Unfiltered probably has glutamate or something in the residue, but reactions have been fairly mild.
SistineKid
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2013 - 12:47 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Lisa! Much appreciated...I haven't been exploring the sulfite aspect. I've been focused on high free glutamate.
SK
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 22, 2013 - 6:28 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Very interesting, Jennifer! I don't know as I've ever seen "100% organic" here; I'll have to look. Red wine is such a ritual around here in some of my groups. It would be nice to have some once in a while.

A while back I did find a reference that said free glutamate is part of the flavor profile for a really good red wine. Luckily my tastes are cheap :-)
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 22, 2013 - 1:57 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes that is a great tip about 100% organic wine! I will have to look out for it as I have not seen anything like that since I started reading labels.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, March 22, 2013 - 8:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the vinegar organic apple cider vinegar? I do best with that.
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 10:09 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Has anyone tried raw coconut vinegar? I just bought some from Tropical Traditions (along with 2.5 gallons of unflavored coconut oil -- they had free shipping so I'm splitting a 5-gal bucket with a friend for deep frying :-)
Jennifer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, April 15, 2013 - 8:46 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Even in the heart of wine country, there are only two brands I've seen in the grocery stores. I can only remember one brand, Frey, from Hopland, CA. Not the same as the more known alcohol-free wine with a similar name. I can't remember the other brand but I don't care for it.

I drive past a winery frequently called Deer Valley, or Deer something or other. On Highway 12 north of Sonoma, possibly located in Kenwood, CA. The sign says "organic". I haven't checked them out but they might have something also.

Jennifer
Jennifer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, April 15, 2013 - 8:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can also make you own vinegar pretty easily. I made rice vinegar by adding a teaspoon of raw apple cider vinegar to leftover sake. It was interesting...not exactly "good". It was weak, but then I added vodka to it a few months later and it bumped the acetic acid level up enough to make it taste like vinegar. It takes a while to ferment. But you can make vinegar out of anything that contains alcohol. If you can find an alcoholic beverage you can tolerate, that would probably be the best base for a vinegar.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Post as "Anonymous"
Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Administration Administration Log Out Log Out   Previous Page Previous Page Next Page Next Page