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Sunflower Seed Butter -- problematic?

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Sunflower Seed Butter -- problematic? « Previous Next »

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Ziva
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Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2011 - 10:09 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, everyone! I was wondering about sunflower seed butter (in particular, Sunbutter Organic). The only ingredient is "fresh roasted organic sunflower seed."

It's very tasty, but I'm starting to wonder if it's a problem. I find myself craving it like crazy, and then when I eat more than a little bit I flush and my cheeks get hot and, strangely, break into a sweat. I'm also trying to figure out if it might be responsible for a subtle negative effect on mood -- not nearly as dramatic or clear-cut as a typical msg reaction, though.

Might this be a glutamate issue? Is it potentially something else? Any thoughts or ideas are very much appreciated!
ali
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Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2011 - 11:43 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Ziva, ive no experience of sunflower seed butter, but if you feel its a problem it most probably is. Trust your instinct and what your body is telling you would be my advice based on personal experience. You can always try it again later and see what happens.
Ali
Jerry Story
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Posted on Friday, April 22, 2011 - 12:48 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I quit sunflower seeds and sesame seed butter when I found they had too much omega-6 and not enough omega-3.

A high ratio of omega-6 over omega-3 promotes tumors.
Di
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Posted on Friday, April 22, 2011 - 4:23 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Foods rich in glutamate and aspartate:

1) Grains: Wheat, barley, and oats are highest. Corn and rice are lower than the previous three but higher than potatoes.

2) Dairy Products: All Cheeses (cheddar, Swiss, Monterey Jack, Mozzarella, PARMESAN) are very high. Casein is very concentrated in cheese and is 20% glutamic acid by composition.

3) Beans: Soy, Pinto, lima, black, navy, and lentils

4) Seeds: Sunflower, pumpkin, etc.

5) Peanuts: Very high, as are cashews, pistachios, and almonds. I have more detailed charts on the site to show exact values for the various nuts. Everything in moderation applies when eating nuts of any kind. So, I do not recommend you reach for nuts when you are really hungry unless you can stop after a few. Nuts are very good for you..in moderation. For example, seven almonds a day gives you what you need .

6) Diet drinks: Primary source of aspartate (aspartame/Nutrasweet)

7) Prepared foods, soups: 70% of prepared foods and many soups have MSG

8) Meats: Note: All meats are naturally rich in glutamate and aspartate. Lamb (and eggs) are the lowest, while rabbit and turkey are the highest.

http://dogtorj.tripod.com/id31.html
Jerry Story
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Posted on Friday, April 22, 2011 - 8:06 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Glutamate can be bound or unbound. In #6 and #7 it is unbound and therefore is bad. Do we need to be concerned about the others?
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Saturday, April 23, 2011 - 5:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jerry, I don't seem to ever react to bound forms of glutamate.
Di
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Posted on Saturday, April 23, 2011 - 8:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Once we've got a handle on 'our' own particular sensitivities, we know what to watch out for, but sometimes newbies (or super sensitive people) need to know what foods are high in glutamate, because it doesn't take much processing of those foods to turn them into the free-glutamic form. Just thought it would be good to pass the list (albeit shortened) to Ziva who was wondering about (processed) sunflower seed butter.
Ziva
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Posted on Saturday, April 23, 2011 - 9:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I really appreciate all of the responses! I am generally pretty good at avoiding glutamate-rich foods, but I seem to have a couple of blind spots :-)

In particular, ali, thank you for the reminder to trust what my body is trying to say -- not sure why I was trying to rationalize away what seems like a pretty obvious reaction!

Also, Di, thank you for the list from DogtorJ - I have definitely been "burned" by quite a few items from that list in the past. It's helpful to see sunflower seeds up there in the company of parmesan, peanuts, and most prepared foods (of course), all of which I know to avoid.

Finally, it's helpful to be reminded of just how processed this product is -- roasted, blended, concentrated, etc. And it probably didn't help that I was enjoying it in abundance!

Thanks again to all. This board is an amazing resource.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, April 24, 2011 - 1:36 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You're very welcome Ziva! :-)

I can only speak from my own experience but i generally dont react to bound glutamte unless its cooked tomatos...i have no luck with tomatos, which is a shame because i love tomato soup and bolognese!! Ive tried and tried (i dont like to admit defeat) but finally had to concede
that my body does not like tomatoes. My youngest daughter cant tolerate them either. Sometimes we all have blind spots or dont want to admit that a favourite food is a problem. Good luck in your endeavour to find all your triggers
Ali
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Sunday, April 24, 2011 - 3:32 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ziva, I only react to tomatoes if there has been citric acid added to them.
evelyn
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Posted on Monday, April 25, 2011 - 8:48 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Di makes a good point - we can "process" foods in our own kitchen, that are high in bound glutamate by the way we cook them. Slow cooking in water hydrolyzes protein, as we know, so using a crock pot, will free glutamate.
Deb A.
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Posted on Monday, April 25, 2011 - 10:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ali, have you ever tried the tomato sauces in our book? One is simply cutting up fresh tomatoes (firm and not overripe, or they will contain more glutamate). Also, most of the glutamate is in the seeds and juice, so you can try removing some of those. Add some olive oil, fresh minced garlic, dry or fresh basil, salt and pepper. Let that sit out for a couple hours and then toss with hot pasta. If you like, you can add the garlic to some hot olive oil in a pan and cook slightly, then add the rest of the ingredients and just heat through and serve on pasta. I like to add some hot pepper flakes and a little stevia, too.
ali
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Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2011 - 12:00 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I havent Deb. I must get the book down off the shelf and have another good read through the recipes. I got a little disheartened with the recipe measurements being in cups. It was quite time consuming to convert everythign to european metric measurements. But Mariann kindly sent me a set of cups and teaspoons so i really must have another go at the recipe section. I do still make the oriental beef (oyster sauce) noodle recipe every week from your book. Its a family favourite as are some of the cake recipes. Ill be sure to have another look through and try some of the tomato recipes in there. Thankyou Deb.

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