Topics Topics Edit Profile Profile Help/Instructions Help    
Search Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Sulfite Sensitivity anyone?

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Sulfite Sensitivity anyone? « Previous Next »

Author Message
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 4:02 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is there any relationship between sulfites & MSG sensitivity?

In looking through my food diary of past reactions, I wonder if my pizza reaction was caused by FGA or sulfites?

Here's an interesting link which says:

"reports that up to 2,900-percent higher levels of lead, 2,840-percent higher levels of added sulfites and 586-percent higher levels of arsenic in low-price imported dehydrated garlic produced with an outdated process in which the garlic is dried over coal fires."

http://westernfarmpress.com/mag/farming_garlic_imports_high/
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 5:30 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Someone was kind enough to prepare an index of Deb A.'s book:
http://www.msgmyth.com/discus/messages/2/1116.html

I discovered she did a nice write-up sulfites on page 50.

She says that "a large percentage of MSG sensitive individuals are also sulfite sensitive"

Interesting.
Jennifer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 10:55 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There sure is a relationship between sulfites and FGA sensitivity.

I am extremely sensitive to sulfites. I've tried to research it, and here's a excerpt from my notes:
. Sulfites knock out the enzyme Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH). GDH
metabolizes glutamate into alpha-ketoglutarate, and important component
of the Kreb's cycle, among other things. (Interestingly sulfa drugs do the same
thing - http://www.beatcfsandfms.org/html/Sulfides.html. Explains why some people are
"allergic" to both, contrary to logic.)
http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/full/279/41/43035
http://www.chem.uwec.edu/Webpapers2005/mintermm/pages/GDH.html
http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/abstract/M402759200v1

A defect in the Kreb's cycle (the source of fuel for cells) could possibly make brain (and other) cells more prone to excitotoxic damage....

Sulfites are also neurotoxic by themselves. Here's some links I found about it, though it's about children born without the enzyme to metabolize sulfites:
http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic2172.htm
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/116/3/757.pdf

I don't know if the additional neurotoxic load of sulfites enhances the effects of FGA or if there's a separate action going on.

Jennifer
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 11:06 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you VERY much Jennifer.

As someone who is sensitive to sulfites, are you by chance reactive to crushed, raw or cooked garlic?

You've given me content for another 6 hours of researching on google :-)

Thanks,
Mike
Jennifer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 11:25 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Before I found Deb's page I was reacting pretty badly to garlic products, and onions to a lesser extent. I took it easy on the garlic for a while, but can now have normal amounts. I don't know if 3 or 4 cloves would do me in, but I could probably tolerate that much depending on what else I've recently eaten.

Once I roasted and ate an entire bulb of garlic on bread, and that was one doozy of a strange reaction. I'm not going to do that again, ever.

Jennifer
Jennifer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 11:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had an article open from one of I links I just posted and read the following text:

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/116/3/757.pdf

"The catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids,
namely, methionine and cysteine, contributes to the bulk of the sulfite load in the body. The metabolic pathway is shown in Fig 4.1,5"



This reminded of an article I read the other day. Is there a link? Hmm...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091216121456.htm
Diet High in Methionine Could Increase Risk of Alzheimer's

Jennifer
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 12:59 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Having done lots of reading on Sulfites, I know that dehydrated potatoes are probably one of the worst things.

The #2 ingredient of the perogies is dehydrated potatoes.

Looking back through my food diary, 8 months ago, I had KFC AND potato/onion perogies the same day.

Once concluding my troubles were MSG related, I of course concluded the KFC was the cause of that terrible episode.

Now I'm questioning all previous conclusions.

Another time I had those perogies with earth balance soy spread. I remember having a bad reaction, and at the time, concluding it must have been soy.

I guess the more data that's collected, the better the conclusions that can be reached.
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 3:34 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In browsing the internet today, I came across:

http://www.glutenfreetrading.com/ShopOnline/AM/150.html

ArrowHead Mills:

tapioca starch flour is denoted as (contains sulfites)

but tapioca starch carries no sulfite designation.

Originally, I was making gluten free bread using tapioca flour and xantham gum and/or guar gum. I don't think I felt great eating it, but there was so much stuff going on, I can't conclude anything.

I wonder if the distinction between
tapioca starch flour and
tapioca starch

is specific to ArrowHead, or in general??

Mike
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 2:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jennifer, Thanks for the link......"ScienceDaily (Dec. 17, 2009) A diet rich in methionine, an amino acid typically found in red meats, fish, beans, eggs, garlic, lentils, onions, yogurt and seeds, can possibly increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease."

This might be another reason to avoid a high protein diet, like in the South beach or Atkins diet, as most folks get the majority of their protein from red meats, fish, beans and eggs.

It's good to have you back posting - you are always so interesting.
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 2:57 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From:
http://allergies.about.com/od/foodallergies/a/sulfites.htm

Here is a list of sulfite foods group by qty:

Greater than 100 ppm of sulfites (very high levels, strict avoidance advised in people with sulfite allergy)

* dried fruits (excluding dark raisins and prunes)
* bottled lemon juice (non-frozen)
* bottled lime juice (non-frozen)
* wine
* molasses
* sauerkraut (and its juice)
* grape juices (white, white sparkling, pink sparkling, red sparkling)
* pickled cocktail onions

Between 50 and 99.9 ppm of sulfites (moderate to high levels of sulfite, avoidance advised in people with sulfite allergy)

* dried potatoes
* wine vinegar
* gravies/sauces
* fruit toppings
* Maraschino cherries

Between 10 and 49.9 ppm of sulfites (low to moderate levels of sulfite, may cause symptoms in people with severe sulfite allergy)

* pectin
* fresh shrimp
* corn syrup
* pickled peppers
* pickles/relish
* corn starch
* hominy
* frozen potatoes
* maple syrup
* imported jams and jellies
* fresh mushrooms
* imported sausages and meats
* cordials (alcoholic)
* dehydrated vegetables
* various cheeses
* corn bread/muffin mix
* canned/jarred clams
* clam chowder
* avocado dip/guacamole
* imported fruit juices and soft drinks
* ciders and cider vinegars

Less than 10 ppm of sulfites (very low sulfite levels, generally do not pose a risk, even for people with sulfite allergy)

* malt vinegar
* canned potatoes
* beer
* dry soup mix
* soft drinks
* frozen pizza and pie dough
* beet sugar
* gelatin
* coconut
* fresh fruit salad
* domestic jams and jellies
* crackers
* cookies
* grapes
* high fructose corn syrup
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 3:17 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

According to:
http://www.aaaai.org/members/allied_health/articlesofinterest/sulfite.stm

"Sulfites also occur naturally in a number of foods such as maple syrup, pectin, salmon, dried cod, corn starch, lettuce, tomatoes, soy products, eggs, onions, garlic, chives, leeks and asparagus."

------------------------------------

Back in August when on vacation, I had an out of the blue reaction. I had shrimp with soy sauce, shrimp scampi with lots of garlic, and salmon. Later, when MSG was on my radar, I assumed it was simply the soy sauce, but it must have been the sum total of that entire meal (FGA & sulfites)

Isn't retroactive analysis fun?!?!

Mike
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 7:01 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In researching a bad reaction to a marinaded steak four months, I was googling steak marinades to see typical ingredients.

OMG: reading this now, with everything I know now, this really looks like a toxic brew on so many levels:

Ingredients: Salt, Sugar, Monosodium Glutamate, Dextrose, Spices, Paprika, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Molasses, Wheat Starch, Citric Acid, Onion Powder, Garlic Powder, Maltodextrin, Caramel Color, Lemon Juice Concentrate, Soy Flour, Soy Lecithin, Natural Flavors, Bromelin, Papain, Sulfites.
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 10:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I found a support board for sulfites at:

http://allergy.hyperboards.com/index.php?action=view_board&board_id=25&start=1
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, December 25, 2009 - 6:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mike, shrimp is commonly dunked in a citric acid solution as soon as it is brought onto the boat to avoid black spot. You have to look high and low to find corn-free shrimp. Also, the meat marinade has the big baddie of citric acid but also has at least five other sources of GMO corn and three sources of GMO soy. Add that to the fact that most commonly available meat is bathed in citric acid when it is butchered and/or has a "broth solution" injected into it and you can see how you had such a horrible reaction.

Tapioca starch is commonly cross contaminated with corn thus usually avoided by corn allergic and guar gum is a GMO corn derivative that I must avoid like the plague. Almost all yeast is also grown on corn except Red Star plain yeast packets (can't use the Red Star in the jar - it has a corn additive) which is grown on potatoes, so there is another pattern to your reactions. Commercial yeast breads are impossible to find for the corn allergic and must be homemade because the brand of yeast is a factor that must be considered (and of course never listed on the label).

I will have a much worse reaction to something with more than one corn derivative than I would with something containing just maltodextrin for example. If you aren't actively trying to avoid the 180 some-odd corn derivatives in our food supply, you are most definitely ingesting some with each meal.

By the way, all of the following usually are treated with or contain corn derivatives:

* dried fruits (excluding dark raisins and prunes)
* bottled lemon juice (non-frozen)
* bottled lime juice (non-frozen)
* wine
* molasses
* sauerkraut (and its juice)
* grape juices (white, white sparkling, pink sparkling, red sparkling)
* pickled cocktail onions

these also are commonly corn contaminated (depending on the brand):

* dried potatoes
* wine vinegar
* gravies/sauces
* fruit toppings
* Maraschino cherries

The same with some brands of every one of these:

* pectin
* fresh shrimp
* corn syrup
* pickled peppers
* pickles/relish
* corn starch
* hominy
* frozen potatoes
* maple syrup
* imported jams and jellies
* fresh mushrooms
* imported sausages and meats
* cordials (alcoholic)
* dehydrated vegetables
* various cheeses
* corn bread/muffin mix
* canned/jarred clams
* clam chowder
* avocado dip/guacamole
* imported fruit juices and soft drinks
* ciders and cider vinegars

This is not to say that there is no such thing as a sulphite sensitivity, but to give you an idea how easy it is to reach that conclusion when it could very well be explained by a corn and soy derivative allergy. Isn't this fun? Now you can see why it took me forever to figure out my problem.

Kristy
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 26, 2009 - 3:08 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OMG: the degree of overlap between sulfites & corn sensitivity is HUGE, and very discouraging.

Looking back through my food diary, there were many times in the last year where I would eat 6 to 8oz of corn chips (fritos or frito lay organic yellow corn chips) each day for weeks without apparent problems.

My reasoning is that if I were so sensitive to corn that the trace amounts in citric acid, etc would be a problem, then actually eating 8oz of corn chips should have killed me, which it didn't.

BTW, the rash is finally nearly gone, and I'm feeling better so I am anxious to conduct some more conclusive experiments!

-Mike
Mariann
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 26, 2009 - 6:51 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow Kristy this is good information on the sulfites. I copied it and am going to keep it handy. Mike thanks for the sulfite compostition information. Mariann
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, December 26, 2009 - 7:48 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, Mike I would have to say that corn chips are very different from citric acid. I do know that citric acid is made from GMO corn and highly processed and corn chips cannot be made from GMO corn (there are recalls if some GMOs slip into the food corn). Seems strange to me that GMO corn isn't allowed into our food supply in its natural form but once it has been processed into chemical additives, it is perfectly legal.

Glad your rash is going - I had a horrible rash of hard, itchy tiny blisters between my fingers and on my palms from corn in the early days. It was maddening. Be careful with your experiments and remember that these things are cumulative. You may be clicking right along and then out of the blue, a tiny amount of something will push you over the edge. If you want to experiment, I suggest that you only add one thing (and a small amount at that) and then wait for at least three days before adding in anything else. I read somewhere that if you ingest something you react to that your heartrate increases immediately. I don't know if it is true, but it might make an interesting experimental criteria. Take your pulse before ingesting the test substance and then immediately after and record it in one of your spreadsheets. One of my reactions was rising body temp so maybe you could record your temperature with a very accurate digital thermometer as well. I am really interested in your experiments and if I hadn't been so sick that is exactly what I would have done. Good luck and keep us posted.

Kristy
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, December 27, 2009 - 3:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Kristy,

Your point about corn chips and ctric acid being different is interesting; maybe my assumption that if corn isn't a problem, then corn derivatives won't be either is incorrect.

I guess the two would be different if the mfg of citric acid concentrates a component which exists in corn in only small amount. Obviously that would NOT be corn protein which I presume is virtually non-existent in citric acid, but plentiful in corn chips.

I came across the pulse test method you mentioned last year when I was frantically seeking the cause.

This is a detailed write-up of the method :
http://synergyhn.com/fa1/

I never actually did it because I finally was able to locate IGG allergy testing.

-Mike
Marmix
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2011 - 11:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

BEWARE TO THE SULFITE CONTENTS IN ALL FORMS OF GARLIC

Hello, Everyone!

I have suffered from GARLIC allergies my whole life - I'm 53 now, and I have to carry an antidote with me all times, which I use quite often, for in the USA you may find garlic even in your ice cream and desserts. Even the smell of garlic from someone who has had it can lead me into an anaphylactic shock.

I wonder if somebody has anything about the amount of sulfites in raw and natural garlic?

Gratefully,
Marmix
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, January 22, 2011 - 4:22 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was glad to see that the link in MikeS post above works. I've noticed that when searching the archives, websites are frequently outdated - gone because they no longer exist. It seems a shame to lose this information and I was wondering if we might come up with a way of archiving these contents, for future reference. Possibly too large a storage burden for this website; if so maybe we can find other options - ie. archive.org or?
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2011 - 4:18 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey guys - I happened across this answer to my question above, regarding broken links: http://www.archive.org/about/faqs.php#The_Wayback_Machine

It was right ther on archive.org all along. Allows you to search archived versions of the internet, so if a link no longer works, you can try searching for it here!
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2011 - 7:22 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

im so glad you posted this- what a wonderful piece of Information to have!!
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2011 - 12:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It was pretty nostalgic looking at my first kids graphics site from years ago: http://web.archive.org/web/19970208050944/kwebdesign.com/kdesk/

If you click on one of the links you'll see an animated red "NEW" arrow. I see that all over the net to this day and no one knows that was one of my original images. Back in those days, stealing images was the norm and I just couldn't keep my stuff from being stolen....
Cathy218
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - 12:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wondering if you all use molybdenum to help with sulfite sensitivities?
Cathy218
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - 12:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have heard that dried potatoes sometimes have sulfites....what types of potato chips do u sulfite sensitive people eat? Thx!
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - 4:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I make my own. Thinly slice potatoes, lightly oil, and bake til crispy.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - 8:50 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do okay with Ruffles. I do take molybdenum and taurine.
AdaLovelace
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - 6:23 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Trader Joe's makes a variety of potato chips that contain nothing more than potatoes, olive oil, and salt. I was looking for a brand of chips that didn't use genetically modified oil (corn, cottonseed, soy, or canola) and didn't use oil high in omega 6... so these deliver! They are great. Whole Foods also sells delicious potato chips from Boulder Canyon that use olive oil.
sara
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, October 04, 2012 - 12:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

the corn free ppl suggest these - just sea salt ones

good health olive oil potato chips
good health avocado oil potato chips

I tried the olive oil ones - reacted to them same as Lays or Ruffles - probably an oxalate reaction -

these are available online at amazon in bulk (as well as other places) - the olive oil ones were available in single 5 oz bag at iherb.com which is where I purchased my trial sack

I have made my own too in the microwave - look for recipes for microwave potato chips - not sure it is good for the microwave- used my salad shooter slicing blades for the potatoes and sprayed olive oil on them before baking
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, October 06, 2012 - 10:36 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lays regular chips are also just potatoes, oil and salt. But who knows about the potatoes...
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, October 06, 2012 - 10:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And from the top of the chain: MSG & sulfite sensitivy - definitely related. (pardon if I am repeating) Sulfite sensitive people have an error in metabolism that results in lower amount of taurine produced in the body. Taurine is the inhibitory neurotransmitter that the body uses to counter act the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. The more glutamate you eat, the less taurine you will have for the other purposes your body needs it. So if you are sulfite sensitive and already naturally low in taurine, you will run down your reserves faster than someone who is not sulfite sensitive. I take taruine just to function, so imagine how much fun I have when I get too much glutamate! Add stress (and that includes good stress, like exercise!) and you can become downright unable to function due to lack of taurine (I did). Taurine balances your electrolytes at the cellular level - a number of people have reported being really thirsy when they start taking it. I'm guessing that is because taurine is doing it's job of balancing electrolytes and telling your body you need more water!
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, October 07, 2012 - 2:53 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Evelyn, interesting, thanks!
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 08, 2012 - 4:49 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Someone mentioned (it's been quite awhile) that Alpha Lipoic acid has something to do with sulfur compounds, I think. I know it can be taken as a supplement, but need to do more research. I'm sticking with taurine. Anyone know anything about DMAE supplements? I see it in all the health magazines. Sorry I haven't been posting lately...been so sick with a nasty bug...thought it was the flu, but that hasn't hit here yet.
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 11:26 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ALA both mobilizes mercury and crosses the blood-brain-barrier so anyone with heavy metal issues should be very careful with it.

What I don't understand about the taurine is that I read it contains sulfur and should be avoided by sulfur sensitive people (heartfixer.com/AMRI-Nutrigenomics.htm) -- but we find it very helpful.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 1:26 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the info, Lisa. Will avoid that one!
There are so many sulfur compounds and some are organic, which are the more dangerous ones for us.
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 9:49 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting! Maybe because it is naturally, organically occurring, as opposed to chemically added to our foods? Also states it is a 'thiol' or mercaptans - bonding strongly with mercury.

Wait a sec. Deb? you're saying the organic ones are more dangerous for us? I assume I am misunderstanding here, because when we have something in nature and then man tries to "improve it" by creating it in a lab, we end up with problems, despite claims (proof?) that it is chemically identical.

[which reminds me of a joke :-) pardon me if you have heard it!]

A group of scientists come to God and say, we don't need you anymore! We created life from nothing, just like you did. And God says, 'Yeah? Show me.' One scientist reaches down and grabs a handful of dirt and draws back a breath, preparing to breath life into in, when God stops him and says,'Hold it right there! Get your own dirt!'
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 22, 2012 - 4:26 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

URL posted above by LisaS (I believe I have seen this before) indicates, on the 'where to now' linked page, that Taurine should be avoided by people who are sulfite sensitive. This makes no sense to me, logically or experientially. Taurine is a by-product of sulfur metabolism, and the error in metabolism causes a lack of taurine in the body. And I've already said this, but taurine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that counteracts glutamate. I don't see the rationale, in the article, for avoiding Taurine - but I'll keep looking. I hate to see people being advised to avoid something that works so well for me!
marie12
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 22, 2012 - 1:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I suspect the reason those who are sulfite sensitive are advised to avoid taurine may be due to how it is processed? i.e. using sulfites? I believe I read that somewhere, and I just found it. This page says to avoid taurine, in the top of the page showing Easy List of Foods to Avoid, on the line for All:
http://www.readingtarget.com/nosulfites/where.htm
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 8:16 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Marie, very interesting speculation. Evelyn, if you find something, let us know -- I feel the same way. I hate to see something so helpful be ruled out, on the other hand I want to know if it's also contributing to one problem while helping with another.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 9:42 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am trying to find more information about sulfur compounds. People who are allergic to sulfites are not able to break down the this form of sulfur...into safer forms of sulfur...such as sulfides, which are inorganic. Sulfur dioxide is a form or organic sulfur (meaning the sulfur is bonded to oxygen, or can be bonded to other gases like nitrogen, hydrogen). If this is not converted to a safer form of sulfur in our body, we can react with various reactions...ammonia is a by-product...not a good one, for some of us when we ingest sulfur, as I recall. Sulfuric acid, sulfites...these are the more dangerous forms of sulfur...many found in nature...even garlic gives off sulfur fumes, as do skunks...
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 4:03 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Marie - I was referring to the page you sited. I found this on manufacture of taurine: 'taurine has been synthetically produced from isethionic acid. This process along with a resulting reaction between sulfurous acid and aziridine leads directly to synthetic taurine' and 'Synthetic isethionic acid is obtained from the reaction of ethylene oxide with aqueous sodium bisulfite, and is used for the industrial production of taurine.'

The taurine I purchase [from nutrabio.com] is 100% pure, us manufactured. Read the info: The taurine used in this free form L-Taurine and our CGT-MAX supplement is produced through chemical synthesis. Absolutely no animal products or by-products are used in its manufacture and there is absolutely no animal urine used in the manufacturing process. This is pure pharmaceutical grade taurine, USP grade - USP26/JP8. This taurine is NON-GMO, BSE/TSE free, and is not treated in any way including irradiation and EtO. This product is free of solvents, preservatives, and pesticides.
Go here and scroll down to read nutrabio's 'pure' message: http://www.nutrabio.com/Products/taurine.htm#.UIfX329G_Sk
I also call and questioned them about the source of their raw materials as well and was told (at time! things change!) that they purchase all raw materials in the US.

I don't love the idea of taking a manufactured, synthetic supplement, but there is just not enough in the foods I eat, to make up for what I lack.

So I am definitely not ruling it out - and maybe we need to help this site correct it's info or add info on the benefits of Taurine.

Once I got on the right track with a clean diet, Taurine is what brought me to full recovery. Just like with MSG, I can show you what happens when I take it, and what happens when I don't.

Wikipedia now has Taurine info that rings 100% true with my experience: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taurine

reading this, I noted so many problems that I see in my Mother, that's it's scary. (also noted the price [at nutrabio.com] has gone up a little - but it's still DARN cheap!! And it's worth it's weight in gold to me.)
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 10:33 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is your taurine from Nutribio.com a powder?
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 8:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Evelyn, how much do you take each day, and at what time of day?

Thanks!
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2012 - 4:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, Deb - it is in powder form. And Lisa I was taking 2Kmg/2X daily for a long time... Now I take 1K mg am (most days - though I get slack on that sometimes) and 2K mg pm in my liquid multi.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2012 - 7:38 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What liquid multi do you take, Evelyn?
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - 6:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Liquid health complete multi. Reasonable price and really decent coverage. Tastes pretty decent too. http://liquidhealthcomplete.com/
Roy Piwovar
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, November 01, 2012 - 1:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tend to get very bad reactions to many of the high potency vitamin mineral blends and would avoid supplements like liquidhealth complete due to its seaweed, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, amino acid blend, fluoride, natural flavoring, etc.
evelyn
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, November 01, 2012 - 9:30 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Definitley some questionable ingredients for folks with msg issues. And when I was very sick I went off it due to the seaweed mainly. I checked with the vendor on the natural flavoring and it was not a concern (but as I always say - things change, so if you are interested, check yourself!) I introduced it back sometime ago with no adverse effects. Not sure it's needed, but it is reasonable peace of mind, that what I don't get from what I eat, I get from my multi. Works for me! Your milage may vary :-)
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2012 - 9:03 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Usually, it takes me about a month, at least, to begin to react to a multi-vitamin that contains some small amount of glutamate or aspartate...been disappointed so many times, I avoid them now...stick to pure powdered forms or tablets that are excitotoxin free. Each of us is different in our tolerance level.
Cathy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, February 03, 2013 - 10:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What bran taurine are you all taking now?
Also is anyone taking molybdenum for sulfite reaction and if so, how much.
Also I am very mineral deficient thus I really want a mineral...but can't have mag, cal citrate. Anyone find one?
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, February 04, 2013 - 7:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We use Country Life Taurine and molybdenum (150mcg): http://www.vitacost.com/country-life-taurine-caps
http://www.vitacost.com/country-life-chelated-molybdenum

Also our multi (http://www.thorne.com/Products/Mens-Health/Multis/prd~VM5.jsp) has some molyb in it, but not a lot since we are only up to two capsules.

(Vitacost is having a they are having a 24 hour 10% off sale today 2/4/13, with free shipping over $49. I don't think I've ever seen a 10% off everything sale. Use the code, HEARTS. Also, if you are a new member and use this link: https://www.vitacostrewards.com/6YJDVh you and I each get $10 off.)

For minerals, check out Thorne. They have several that are very specifically formulated. E.g., this one has aspartate forms:

http://www.thorne.com/Products/Minerals/Multi_Minerals/prd~M202.jsp

Watch out though because some of their mixes have alpha lipoic acid which is a strong heavy metal chelator and heavy metals cause nasty glutamate reactions, for us anyway.
Di
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, February 04, 2013 - 10:49 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use NutraBio L-Taurine. Ingredient - free form L-Taurine. Works well.
Anonymous
 
Posted From: 76.184.229.7
Posted on Sunday, February 10, 2013 - 7:20 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Muir Glen tomato paste does have citric acid, naturally derived, whatever that means. I wouldn't take a chance on eating it.
Pat
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 - 7:19 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Had a bad reaction tonight - suspect it was 'bottled' garlic. I know garlic contains sulphur, but I never reacted to raw garlic before. Thus I didn't think bottled garlic would be an issue.

I haven't ingested MSM (methylsulfonylmethane) lately & think I should just toss the jar of it. Wonder if it would harm the compost pile or the soil in which future plants might be grown. Do plants transpose this stuff into usable & good edible veggies? And will the end product be more highly sulphur-ated?

There's just so much to know.
Thanks again to Deb for providing this website & for all who participate & respond.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 9:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry you had a bad reaction. Was there citric acid added to the bottled garlic. I do best with fresh garlic...love my garlic press!
Some plants need more sulfur than others...don't know which,though.
LisaS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 10:07 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is Emily still on the board? I know she is very sulfur-sensitive, and it would be interesting to know if she reacts to bottled garlic. I never have but I'm only sensitive to processed sulfites.
Pat
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 11:26 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I re-jar'd the bottled garlic into a smaller jar & forgot to save the label :-(.

Never had a reaction to it before, so I re-analyzed what I ate & came to the conclusion the culprit was 5 dates!

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Post as "Anonymous"
Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Administration Administration Log Out Log Out   Previous Page Previous Page Next Page Next Page