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Brand Names of Food Products You Have...

Battling the MSG Myth » Archive » Brand Names of Food Products You Have Found Safe « Previous Next »

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
Brand Names of Food Products Not SafeLaurie M90 10-27-01  10:50 am
Miracle Drug that helped meDeb A.23 8-30-01  10:08 am
Organic holiday treatsDeb A.12-13-00  12:28 pm
Safe VitaminsMEMorrisNJ28 6-04-01  8:41 am
Safe Name BrandsDeb A.39 10-02-01  8:07 am
Is margarine made from Safflower Oil safe?Carol H13 4-14-01  1:40 pm
Amy's organic soupValerie14 3-22-01  3:35 am
Safe hot dogs and pasta sauceDeb S4-19-01  3:44 pm
Is Soya Flour and Gelatin safe from MSG?Carole49 8-18-01  4:13 pm
Products I found safeRuth14 10-05-01  9:16 pm
Soya products , milk,yogourt etc.Tom Fernstrom5-23-01  7:41 am
Safe products?Ruth15 10-03-01  12:14 pm
  ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page        

Author Message
Gerry Bush
Posted on Tuesday, October 24, 2000 - 6:46 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

MMMmmmmmmm!!
All varieties of "DON POMIDORO" pasta sauce made in Italy and comes in a glass jar. Try the Primavera, Vodka Tomato, or Marinara, all are very delicious and very safe as they are really all natural. I make a mean sauce myself, but these are really like homemade. I get them at the local Italian deli. Enjoy.
Deb A.
Posted on Wednesday, October 25, 2000 - 7:55 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm VERY jealous, Gerry! Wish I could find that product here. It would be such a convenience to find a commercial sauce like that. Anyone in the Pacific Northwest have any luck finding a safe sauce like that?
Gerry Bush
Posted on Wednesday, October 25, 2000 - 12:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you have a good Italian deli, ask them about it. My local guy gets regular shipments from a US importer. You should be able to find it. If your local deli needs the name of the importer, let me know and I'll ask Mr. Sanguini.
Deb A.
Posted on Wednesday, October 25, 2000 - 3:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Gerry. We don't have a good Italian deli, but maybe I could do a search on the net for this product, also.
M-Y
Posted on Thursday, October 26, 2000 - 4:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm going to try the Olive Garden.
What worked or didn't work for you?
{{{apprehensive}}}
Vicki Ketch
Posted on Thursday, November 02, 2000 - 10:57 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

M-Y,
Go ahead and try the Olive Garden, trust me it is wonderful and the dressing is safe and very good. I have been told that they bottle it and sell it also, but of course you will want to check the label for anything they might have added when they bottled it. The Olive Garden is the only place I can go out and eat a salad!!
Enjoy
Vicki
M-Y
Posted on Thursday, November 02, 2000 - 2:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you Vicki....I miss eating out so I'm going to give it a try.
Vicki Ketch
Posted on Friday, November 03, 2000 - 6:09 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

M-Y,
I personally can eat all the salad I want with Olive Gardens dressing and I eat the cheese Ravoli with marinara sauce. That is all I have been brave enough to try. But, just eating a salad is such a treat!!! Enjoy!
Anonymous
Posted on Saturday, November 04, 2000 - 7:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

bread...jiff peanut butter is safe...welches grape jelly is safe...kraft mayonnaise is safe...you can survive on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches until you feel well enough to test other foods...wash things such as canned vegetables very thoroughly before cooking...also wash all meats such as pork chops and chicken before cooking...chicken dogs are safe but not beef or pork...is there a chemical you can test your food with?...
Carol H
Posted on Sunday, November 05, 2000 - 7:27 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, some breads are not safe, some people may react to Kraft mayonnaise, and canned vegetables are actually safer than you think. Most canned veggies are put in the can fresh with water and salt and heated only long enough to kill harmful organisms, which cooks them in the process. (Canned meats are another story - look for only meats with water and salt added.) Washing canned vegetables will actually reduce the content of water soluble vitamins even further. Vitamins B6 and C actually are necessary to deal with MSG to get rid of it. Washing meats won't get rid of MSG injected into them. Some beef hot dogs are safe. I'm not sure all chicken ones are. Unfortunately, we aren't aware of a test yet.
Deb A.
Posted on Sunday, November 05, 2000 - 8:49 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Welches grape jelly contains pectin, which is a source of free glutamic acid, and the fillers in pectin are sometimes modified cornstarch and similar substances.Most commercial jams and jellies also contain corn syrup, which very senstitive individuals can react to. AuxiGro is now being sprayed extensively on grapes, too. Jiff may not bother some people, but be careful of peanut butters that contain di- and tri- glycerides, products of hydrolyzed corn. Dextrose, and other corn sugars are sometimes added, too. Most mayonnaises contain sulfites added to preserve a very perishable product. It does not need to be labeled, just as in peeled potato products. The "spices" and "natural flavors" can often times just mean MSG. And the lemon juice used may contain sulfites. Jack Samuels and others tell us that many products, including some canned vegetables are "spiked" with MSG, meaning it's unlabeled and illegally done. MSG has been used for years to eliminate the tinny taste of vegetables and fuits that are canned. Look for those which are in cans lined with a white coating. Unfortunately, MSG binds with other proteins in foods such as meats, and cannot be washed out, as Carol said. Carol, can you give us the name of a beef hotdog you have done okay with??!!! I would love a good old-fashioned hotdog. To the moderately sensitive, such religious avoidance may sound extreme, but I deal with individuals who are so sensitive, that even minute amounts of MSG can land them in the hospital with seizures or anaphylactic shock. As for an MSG test, we know of none. It would be difficult to create such a test or to get accurate results, since 80% of the foods we eat contain natural glutamic acid, and such a test would most likely indicate a presence of both that and factory produced free glutamate, or MSG.
Carol H
Posted on Sunday, November 05, 2000 - 10:13 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The hot dog my boyfriend can eat without an asthma reaction is the Boar's Head BEEF hot dog in natural casing. Be aware that the regular ones have MSG. I hate buying any Boar's Head product but my boyfriend just loves these. Be VERY careful. Others very sensitive may not be able to eat these. Also safe for him are hot dogs made by Sussex Meat Packing in Wharton, NJ. As far as canned veggies go, you are probably better off using the organic frozen ones. There is not much you can do about adulterated products that are not labeled truthfully. Adulterated food products are the oldest form of cheating the consumer. The best thing to do is to try foods carefully and stick to brands you trust. As for tests, when I took food analysis class in college, the simple chemical tests for protein compounds were highly destructive because foods contain hundreds of compounds that get in the way, fiber, fat, etc. It's like physics where you change the thing you are observing just by observing it. The other more accurate tests, need expensive laboratory equipment you can't just carry around. It takes very skilled operators to even run the equipment and the samples still need adequate preparation.
Deb S
Posted on Sunday, November 05, 2000 - 10:37 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I found an uncured beef weiner with no MSG or nitrate/nitrite, made by Hemplers B.B. Meat & Sausage Co., Bellingham, WA. Ingredients listed on the package are: Beef, Water, Honey, Salt, Flavorings, Paprika. It is in the freezer section of some natural food markets. They are really delicious, too. They use beef grown without added hormones or feed antibiotics. I made it through one package without having a noticeable reaction, so they may be safe.

I found their website and just e-mailed the co. asking what is in the "flavorings" used.

http://www.hemplers.com/hemplers/

Their phone number is also listed there, in case anybody (Deb A.? Joanne G.?) would like to call them. I will post any response I receive.
Deb A.
Posted on Sunday, November 05, 2000 - 1:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Deb S.! My sister lives near Bellingham, and we visit her often. Please let us know what their response is to what the "flavorings" are, okay? A juicy grilled hotdog would be wonderful to taste again!
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Sunday, November 05, 2000 - 1:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Carol,

Anyone who trusts food manufacturers should read this book:

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Literature/Sinclair/TheJungle/
Carol H
Posted on Monday, November 06, 2000 - 1:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Excellent link, Roy. It reminds me of that saying "Those who love sausages or laws shouldn't watch either one being made." (Bismarck?) The Jungle was like "Silent Spring" in the impact it had on the public.
Deb A.
Posted on Monday, November 06, 2000 - 3:41 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rachel Hunter, the author of Silent Spring has always been a hero for me. I picture her smiling "up there" at the knowledge that her allegations about our environment and health were right on, but feeling terribly sad at the same time. Ruth Winter's additives book is excellent,too.
Anyone catch the news today about a "natural" pesticide that has now been linked to Parkinson's disease? I only caught the tail end on one of the morning news shows, and didn't get the facts. I heard that scientists were going to study this and other environmental factors as the cause for diseases that effect the nervous system. Do we dare to get excited that "they" will finally put two and two together as Dr. John Olney did over 40 years ago, along with other so-called alarmists like Hunter?
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Monday, November 06, 2000 - 4:31 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dr. John Olney was the courageous researcher I discovered decades ago while combing the library for answers to my MSG reactions. His findings confirmed my suspicions:

http://www.chem-tox.com/pregnancy/pregmsg.htm
J. Fallowfield
Posted on Tuesday, November 07, 2000 - 6:35 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is anyone aware of any organizations that deal with MSG and its adverse reactions for Canadian residents?
Deb A.
Posted on Tuesday, November 07, 2000 - 7:40 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No, but you are invited to start one!!! You may post your e mail address under the proper topic, and invite other Canadians to do the same. You may also contact NoMSG and ask to be put in touch with other Canadian members. 1 800 BEAT MSG. Also, you can create your own website for Canadian MSG awareness and support.
M-Y
Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2000 - 3:20 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I understand that The Olive Garden has Portabella stuffed ravioli with a cream sauce of some kind.
Does anyone know if this entree is safe for MSG
sensitive individuals? If not what is safe besides the salads at the Olive Garden? I'm
trying to build up courage to eat there armed
with all of the information I can get.
Deb S
Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2000 - 8:17 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would be very careful at the Olive Garden if I were you. I tried it once and ordered a chicken and pasta dish (can't remember which one) that sounded relatively innocent. No "sauce" to speak of, more of a sauteed veggies kind of deal with fettucini and chicken breast. They serve salad already tossed with their house dressing. I asked to see the label, and it did have some suspect ingredients (gums, parmesan or other cheese, etc.), so I had them bring salad without any dressing and used oil and vinegar, sparingly. No croutons. I think I ate about half of a breadstick. I spent the next day with the usual migraine.

Someone else posted on the MSG discussion board that the chicken at Olive Garden bothered them, too. It might depend on where they get their chicken and whether it's already been treated with flavor enhancers and/or preservatives. I didn't think to ask about marinades or seasoning salt. I was actually lulled into thinking there wouldn't be a problem because people had posted that they could eat there without having any reactions!
Gerry Bush
Posted on Friday, November 10, 2000 - 8:09 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

M-Y, I will never eat at the Olive Garden again. To my body, even the salad is unsafe. Don't subject yourself to the pain. It's just not worth it. Also, I never eat either pork or chicken out as much of it is now treated with sodium lactate and/or sodium phosphate, which give me a similar reaction as does MSG.
Olive Garden is a big chain restaurant, you can be sure that msg is there someplace.
Deb A.
Posted on Friday, November 10, 2000 - 9:51 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You might try a spinach cheese type ravioli as someone here once suggested, but do avoid any of the salad dressings. Remember, everybody has a different tolerance for MSG...some will react to minute amounts and others can handle a bit more.
Someone said they did well with a plain tomato sauce and pasta...sometimes you just gotta try...I know the feeling. Try not eating the whole thing and bring the rest home. I just tried a chicken dish at the Indian restaurant that we usually do well at, and got a bad headache the next day. Last month I ordered a chicken enchilada for the first time in years, and reacted the same way. I'm sure what has been mentioned about treated chicken is correct. I do better with beef and vegetarian type entrees.
M-Y
Posted on Friday, November 10, 2000 - 2:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the warnings about eating out. It isn't worth the pain that I probably would experience.
Shirley Rae
Posted on Sunday, November 12, 2000 - 3:23 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I notice that people are suggesting buying foods in cans. When I was very sick, my doctor told me not to eat anything out of cans, which are all coated with preservatives in order to keep the cans from rusting. My husband who works for a major canning factory who makes the cans agrees with the doctor. The preservatives are sprayed onto the sheets before the cans are form and pressed. It seems, we are doomed even before the cans leave the factory. I have felt much better since I followed my doctor's advice.
Carol H
Posted on Sunday, November 12, 2000 - 6:15 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shirley,

You are correct, though, in that epoxy coatings are sprayed on cans as a liner to protect the metal. According to this website http://www.bisphenol-a.org/epoxy.html Bisphenol-A can migrate from the plastic into food. At this time it is not seen as a problem. However, since some people are very sensitive to plastics, these folks may need to avoid foods sold in plastic of any kind, heating up foods in plastic ware, and avoid canned foods.

Regarding food preservatives and MSG: these are not found in all canned foods. Canned foods don't need preservatives of any kind for the food itself as mentioned in these sites:
http://www.mealtime.org/news/fact_canning.html and http://www.aces.uiuc.edu/~nutrican/studyfinal.html That is the basis of the recommendation.
Frank
Posted on Wednesday, November 15, 2000 - 3:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just got this from my local newspaper:

Translated from spanish;

" Crunchy Bacon
Betty Crocker launched to the market the new Bac-Os, free of monosodium glutamate (abbreviated MSG). The new crunchy bacon is already available at the biggest supermarkets on the island."

Just wondering if anyone have tried this Crunchy Bacon by Betty Crocker and had any reactions?
Roy Piwovar
Posted on Wednesday, November 15, 2000 - 6:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My guess is it probably has hidden forms of MSG in it instead. I'd read the label carefully:

http://www.bettycrocker.com/allabout/whatsnew/index2.asp?SI=sides_prod/productBAC.html
Deb A.
Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2000 - 10:24 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Look for words like: hydrolyzed protein, autolyzed yeast, calcium caseinate, soy protein, etc.....all high in free glutamic acid.
Frank
Posted on Friday, December 01, 2000 - 5:36 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I haven't had any reactions with this products:

1- Breyers Natural Strawberry Ice Cream
2- Breyers Natural Vanilla Ice Cream
3- Tropicana Pure Premium Orange Juice (not from concentrate)

Avoid Sunny Delight Orange Juice and the V8 one's, all of them include corn syrup, which most people react to.
Deb S
Posted on Friday, December 01, 2000 - 6:30 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doesn't Sunny Delight also have aspartame? And V8, MSG? Correct me if I'm wrong...
Frank
Posted on Friday, December 01, 2000 - 8:06 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yup! That's why I said "avoid" :)

Corn Syrup -> MSG

Most sweet foods I react is because of the corn syrup or high fructose corn syrup. I think it must be high on msg.

About Sunny Delight, Aspartame is not noted on the ingredients list, I think they use sugar. Aspartame is mostly used for diet foods and drinks.
Carol H
Posted on Friday, December 01, 2000 - 12:54 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I didn't think Sunny Delight even qualified as food:)
Gerry Bush
Posted on Friday, December 01, 2000 - 5:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Carol....I liked that retort!!!!
Deb S
Posted on Friday, December 01, 2000 - 5:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oops... sorry, I was thinking of Crystal Light, which has aspartame.
Ruth
Posted on Saturday, December 02, 2000 - 2:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Frank,
Watch out for Breyers ice creams (now owned by Good Humor), as several people were reacting to the natural strawberry and peach flavors last summer.
Carol H
Posted on Sunday, December 03, 2000 - 4:54 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Frank, another reason foods that have high fructose corn syrup in them are not a good idea for those who react to MSG is that high fructose corn syrup is not the same as the fructose found in fruit juice, or even crystalline fructose. High Fructose Corn Syrup has a glycemic index (GI) of nearly the same as table sugar - about 65. Crystalline fructose, by contrast, has a GI of only 30. The glycemic index is a measure of how rapidly the blood sugar rises and causes an insulin response. Foods that have a high GI, such as those loaded with high fructose corn syrup, will cause a hypoglycemic reaction soon after they are eaten. This is bad if you want to be ready to deal with accidentally ingested MSG.
Deb A.
Posted on Monday, December 04, 2000 - 11:32 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Carol, how can one be sure that when they are buying fructose, that it is not the kind manufactured from corn, as much of it is today. Will it say on a package? I notice it's offered in bulk in some stores, but I have been leary of it. Thanks and am sending a big hug your way! Thanks for all the wonderful info you share with us all the the time!
Evelyn Hoover
Posted on Tuesday, December 05, 2000 - 10:28 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm new to the world of avoiding MSG. The teachers/school staff suspect my son has ADD. I don't want to medicate a 5-year-old. When I was searching for alternatives, I stumbled across the MSG connection. So, we are working hard to eliminate MSG from our diet. I'm hoping someone would be able to comment on whether there is a lot of MSG in cheese. Are there brands that don't contain any MSG or very little? My son loves pizza and I'll gladly make it at home from scratch, but I'm uncertain about the cheese. Any information would be appreciated.
Deb A.
Posted on Tuesday, December 05, 2000 - 1:52 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I buy a freshly made mozzarella cheese at Costco and do well with that, even though it is made from low fat milk. I also use Tillamook colby jack and other mild whole milk cheeses, including other mozzarella brands that are made from whole milk. The aged cheeses effect most of us negatively. Parmesan and Romano contain high amounts of free glutamic acid due to the aging process, so avoid or go VERY easy on them.
Carol H
Posted on Tuesday, December 05, 2000 - 2:23 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Evelyn, if you are worried, and want to try to avoid cheese altogether, make different kinds of pizza. I make my own pesto sauce without the parmesan cheese and spread that on a pizza crust or pocketless pita bread. I then chop up little pieces of fresh chicken, green peppers, and onions, and throw them on top. I then bake that until the chicken is cooked through. I even prefer it to regular tomato pizza. Deb A is right about the aged cheeses being worse. The harder and saltier a cheese is indicates the relative amount of MSG. Mozzarella - the fresh kind sold packed in water (not the aged kind) is generally the safest.
Donna L
Posted on Tuesday, December 05, 2000 - 6:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am new to the MSG restrictive diet, and want to know if I am right in thinking bread products from Natural Ovens of Wisconsin are O.K. As far as I can tell they all seem O.K. and they really are good. You can order them from the web, but their deliver fee is $8.00. It is easy to get them in MN, but I don't know about elsewhere. They have really good cookies too.
Evelyn H.
Posted on Wednesday, December 06, 2000 - 12:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've tried some of the Natural Ovens products. You're right they are good. I would read the ingredient list carefully. One of the varieties I purchased had whey and another had "natural" flavor.

Thanks for the information on the cheeses. I'll see what I can get in the small town where I live.
Carol H
Posted on Wednesday, December 06, 2000 - 3:17 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb A,
About fructose, there are a few that are made from fruit. I don't know which ones they are. I believe the most widely found fructose - Estee is made from corn.
Deb A.
Posted on Thursday, December 07, 2000 - 2:15 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Carol. You are still saying that if we can tolerate the fructose made from corn, it would be better for our system than cane sugar, right???
Carol H
Posted on Saturday, December 09, 2000 - 11:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Definitely. You won't surge and crash. Table sugar gives a blood sugar rise and insulin surge that will result in hunger in about 1-1/2 hours. Fructose from fruit or in crystalline form will help you last a few more hours. If, however, you do have an MSG reaction, table sugar will give you a quick rise to help you deal with it, but you better eat something soon after, because you will crash, blood sugar-wise.
MEMorrisNJ
Posted on Saturday, December 09, 2000 - 2:23 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is 100% maple syrup the same as using plain sugar? Is there anything that we may have to watch in using 100% maple syrup?
Do I recall correctly that honey may be troublesome for some folks? I can't recall why. Can someone respond? Thanks!
Carol H
Posted on Sunday, December 10, 2000 - 4:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

MEMorris,

Maple syrup and honey are high in sucrose, which has a high Glycemic Index. If you are hypoglycemic, you should limit maple syrup and honey. Try using a fruit-based puree or spread sweetened only with fruit juice instead.
Deb S
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2000 - 10:34 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Re: New Bac-Os with "No MSG": The label does indeed state that it contains hydrolyzed protein (corn, soy, wheat). Isn't that supposed to be in violation of the labeling laws, because hydrolyzed protein by its definition contains free glutamate?
Carol H
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2000 - 3:36 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb S,
Unfortunately, the labeling laws permit this kind of deception. Manufacturers don't have to label MSG unless added in its pure form.
Deb S
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2000 - 6:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

True, but they shouldn't be allowed to boast of "No MSG" when their product contains hydrolyzed protein. Here's the link to the page on the Truth In Labeling website that I was thinking of:

http://www.truthinlabeling.org/nomsg.html
Deb A.
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2000 - 8:31 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Manufacturers know exactly what they are doing. They know they don't have to indicate that free glutamic acid is present if it is the component of some other substance, such as hydrolyzed protein. They know the law and they abuse it to sell their product..bottom line. That's why Jack Samuels tried suing the FDA...to end deceptive labeling. Didn't work. A bottle of Knudsen's guava juice stated "no preservatives". When I got ill after drinking it, a company spokesman warned me not to drink it if I was sulfite sensitive. Apparently, she knew that the white grape juice they add and have tanked in, contains preservatives. They know that they don't have to label sulfites if the amount is 10 pts. per million or less, but still they go ahead and mislead us with their labeling. We are at the mercy of labeling laws.
Laurie M
Posted on Tuesday, January 02, 2001 - 8:10 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Help, I live in Alaska and I can't find any milk to drink. I love dairy and I have had to eliminate virtually everything but yogurt and sour cream and butter. Horizon Organic makes great sour cream and butter but their milk is ultra pasturized and vitamin enriched. Does anybody know a good brand name. I can get my health food store to order it hopefully. Any cheese would be great too. I am driving my husband crazy taking all the food away.
Judy
Posted on Tuesday, January 02, 2001 - 11:14 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Laurie, I live in a small town and can not get Horizon Organic milk, so, I've given up on milk except about 1/4 cup twice a week used sparingly on cereal. I use Original Rice Milk (no, it's not really milk) for most milk needs, like on grains or when I want something besides green tea or water to drink. Since I can't have yeast, wheat or soy I don't bother with baking for myself. I forget cheeses for myself, too. I cook 'regular' foods for my husband and family. It's ok...I feel great, they feel great so everyone is happy.
Gerry Bush
Posted on Tuesday, January 02, 2001 - 7:20 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Laurie M-I am usually safe with cheese from France, Switzerland and Italy as they have strict regulations to process them. I avoid American cheeses like the plague!
I am only able to drink "Trader Joe's" milk here in AZ. Horizon and Organic Valley are large cooperatives and are not safe for us in spite of what they may say. Don't they have local dairies in Alaska? If not and you can't get Trader Joe's, I wouldn't drink milk if I were you. Sstay away from "Ultrapasteurized".
Deb A.
Posted on Wednesday, January 03, 2001 - 8:22 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Laurie, I get all kinds of reports from people about milk products they can and cannot use. Some find no problem with Horizon or Organic Valley, so I'm assuming that everyone has a different tolerance level than others for the amount of glutamate they can handle. Or perhaps the product is better in some areas than others. I'm finding that some people only react to factory created MSG, hydrolyzed protein, and other such free glutamate containing products, but they have little or no problem with its more natural forms, such as that found in tomatoes or some dairy products. Each of us has a different body chemistry, so I would suggest that the best way to find out if a certain milk is fine for you is to try it for a week at least. I do best with Rice Dream plain rice milk, and the less dairy I consume, the better I feel. I can handle a little Organic Valley whole milk to cream a hot drink, but that's about it. Wish we had a Trader Joe's here. Many swear by their milk. I don't know if they mean the whole organic only or if the low fat versions are okay, too.
Laurie M
Posted on Thursday, January 11, 2001 - 8:55 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Has anybody tried the Lm or low methoxyl pectin made from oranges? I would love a pectin I could use to make jam. I would appreciate any ideas.
Deb A.
Posted on Friday, January 12, 2001 - 10:32 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Laurie, I am not familiar with this product. What are the fillers on the label? Making jam by boiling equal parts pureed fruit and sugar, and the juice of 1 lemon for 20 to 30 minutes is the way I make my jams and they set up great. IF you are using a low [pectin fruit such as peaches or strawberries, add a cup of not too ripe pureed apricots or fresh chopped apples, especially under ripe. They are loaded with natural pectin.
Laurie M
Posted on Saturday, January 13, 2001 - 6:05 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Deb. I love your book! The ingredients in low methoxyl pectin are: low methoxyl citrus pectin (only from oranges), a separate packet of monocalcium phosphate to help low calcium fruits gel. You don't need sugar to make it gel. It does recommend a little bit of honey. That is it. No sugar or preservatives. It supposedly works well enough to make Jello without gelatin. I haven't tried it. I don't want to make a batch of something yummy and then not be able to eat it.
Laurie
Judy T
Posted on Sunday, January 14, 2001 - 9:26 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

McCormick's original chili seasoning comes in a package. This works for me ussed in moderation. It has chili pepper and other spices, enriched wheat flour, onion, salt and garlic. Probably msg in the other spices, but this is a real treat to use on hamburger (or ground elk). I add cooked kidney beans and Muir Glen tomato sauce or tomatoes at the last minute. Wow. A chili dish I can eat with minimum of cooking. This is a luxury for me since I rarely can eat anything that is processed in any way, not even wheat. Compare that to McCormick's spaghetti sauce mix: potato starch, sugar, salt, onion, maltodextrin, whey solids, paprika, mushrooms, spices, garlic, nonfat dry milk solids, buttermilk solids, American cheese, silicon dioxide, reduced lactose whey solids, parsley, natural and artificial flavor, cream solids, lactic acid, fd&c yellow 5 and and red 40, garlic oil and onion oil. My gawd, this is a panoply of no-no's. Anyway, thought I'd share this. Has anyone else tried McCormick's Original Chili Seasoning with good luck...or bad?
Deb A.
Posted on Sunday, January 14, 2001 - 10:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Laurie...happy to hear you enjoy the book! Unless you have any adverse reaction to the calcium phosphate, that product seems fine. Please let us know if it works for you. Where do you find it?
Judy, if the Chili seasoning works for you, great!
When I settled out in the West after being a NY state native , I learned how to make chili without McCormick's for the first time. The main seasonings are chili powder, cumin powder, garlic. oregano, and cayenne. I sometimes add a teaspoon of cocoa...sounds strange, but it adds zip. I prefer to use the Muir Glen tomato puree since it doesn't contain citric acid. I use half a can and then some of my frozen tomatoes, adding them the last little while, as you do. I just discovered naturally smoked dried unseasoned chipoltle chilies. Not sure I spelled them right. Anyway, I tried soaking them in hot water, (1 to 2 is plenty, since they are hot), seeded them and them pureed them with tomatoes (or puree), garlic, salt, pepper, sugar, and lemon juice. It makes delicious smoky flavored barbecue sauce. I cook my meat until almost done, and then pour the sauce over it to bake the last 10 to 15 minutes.
Judy T
Posted on Sunday, January 14, 2001 - 2:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb A: I admire a person who cooks. I detest, hate, despise cooking. For me cooking is frying up a hamburger patty or boiling an egg. Someone was thinking of opening a restaurant that was msg-free. Why, gosh, I might relocate just to live near such a place.
Deb A.
Posted on Sunday, January 14, 2001 - 6:45 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As much as I enjoy MOST of the cooking I have to do, Judy, I would absolutely love such a restaurant, as all of us here would! I was lucky that I had two grandmothers living down the block who loved to cook, and taught me the ropes early on. That was in the early 60's when most moms stayed home and learned the art of cooking from their moms. Times have changed and busy women have come to rely so much on commercially prepared foods. I did for years, and thought I would die without my cream of mushroom soup and bottled spaghetti sauce! Luckily, my kids are all grown and so I fuss very little. We eat more simply and that is fine with me.
Laurie M
Posted on Friday, March 09, 2001 - 7:47 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am not a beer drinker. Never was but I have a recipe for beer bread that is quick easy and really yummy. My problem is I don't know whether there is any beer I can ingest. Has anyone found a brand that they have been able to use without a reaction? Any help would be appreciated. My husband has requestd it for dinner tomorrow.
Deb A.
Posted on Friday, March 09, 2001 - 12:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would carbonated water work? Most beers contain sulfites and glutamate from the barley malt.
Deb S
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2001 - 7:39 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Laurie,
Well, I tried an experiment last night that should help you decide what to put in your recipe (or what NOT to). I had read that someone else who posts on this board is able to enjoy 1-2 Bud Lights fairly often. So I had one when I got home. It didn't cause any weird feelings immediately (as most beers do), so I thought it was going to be okay. But by bedtime I had a slight headache, and I awoke with a medium headache which is still there. Since my MSG reactions usually take longer to manifest, it is probably the combination of glutamate and tyramine that is doing this. I have yet to connect any of my reactions to sulfites, but that could be part of it, too. Sigh... :(
Laurie M
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2001 - 9:24 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the help guys. I guess I will just be making it for everyone else. My husband loves beer. It's too bad. The bread tasted great, but it was the beer that did the trick. It helped it to rise and gave most of the flavor. No kneading or anything. Just mix and pour and bake.:(
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2001 - 12:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can anyone tell me if Pacific Rice Milk is free of MSG or hidden sources?
I'm on the Gluten free forum and they think it's free of Gluten (rice Dream Rice milk has gluten).
Now, if it's free of MSG, I will be very happy.

If I don't get a response here, I'll try getting the phone number and call them.
Ruth
Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2001 - 9:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pam,
List the ingredients of the Pacific Rice Milk for us and maybe someone here can try and figure it out. MSG is listed on labels only if it is 100%. MSG can be in any ingredient and not have to be listed if it is less than 100%. The company might not know that MSG is in their product in hidden forms. I'm going to look for it at my local Whole Foods.
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Sunday, June 17, 2001 - 3:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here are the ingredients in Pacific Rice Milk:
Filtered Water, Brown Rice, Guar Gum, Xanthan Gum, Carob Bean Gum, Carrageenan, Sea Salts.

So, it looks like it's off limits to MSG sensitive people. Guess I'll have to go without milk for a while longer.
Ruth
Posted on Sunday, June 17, 2001 - 4:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was surprised to find organic iceberg head lettuce the other day at Whole Foods Market. I didn't think that variety of lettuce came in organic. I prefer the red leaf, but the rest of my family likes the iceberg better.
Deb S
Posted on Sunday, June 17, 2001 - 6:13 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pam - It looks like everything in the Pacific Rice Milk is problematic except for the water, rice and sea salt. Carrageenan is made from seaweed and usually contains enough free glutamate to cause reactions. Xanthan gum is another no-no; and the other gums also likely add some additional glutamate.


But you don't have to go without -- :)

Here are the ingredients in Rice Dream Original Rice Milk: Filtered water, certified organic brown rice (partially milled)*, expeller pressed high oleic safflower oil, sea salt.
*Organically grown and processed
It does have a warning on the label: Not for use as infant formula. Contains less than .002% barley protein. Not sure where that comes from.
Judy T
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 7:13 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rice Dream Original is the key. The other Rice Dreams milks I can't do, but the Original is wonderful.
Pam Maddigan
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 4:37 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure about the Rice Dream Original. I used to drink it, but always felt a bit "off" when I drank more than 8oz per day.

The following statement had been added to the forbidden foods list on the Gluten free website.
"Rice and soy beverages (i.e., Rice Dream), because their production process utilizes barley enzymes"

A thought just occurred to me though.....
I was having a reaction to this BEFORE I was aware of my MSG sensitivity.

Now that I am fairly clean, I may be able to tolerate it.

I'd like to hear from other Gluten, Lactose, & MSG suffers out there.
What are you drinking for milk?
Anonymous
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 4:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Try notmilk.com for interesting alternatives.

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