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Feeling very sick. How long does a MS...

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I've Just Made the MSG Connection" » Feeling very sick. How long does a MSG reaction last. « Previous Next »

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Anonymous
 
Posted From: 98.168.141.30
Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:22 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi,
I just recently made the connection to MSG and how bad I feel. I have a long, complicated medical history that inclueds benzo use which kills the bodyies imune system so I am hyper sensative to any form of glutimate.

Saturday I felt pretty good but that night ate at a restaurant and completely forgot about my MSG problem. Woke up Sunday morning with crushing depression, anxiety and several other symptoms. I made it through Sunday and Monday and today has been one of the worst days of my life.

Out of nowhere I was hit with a wave of anxiety/depression, sneezing, heart palps, cold/numb feet, brain fog and cant concentrate of focus. I've never really reacted like this before and I do know the food I ate Saturday did contain larege amounts of MSG.

Hoping someone can tell me how long this episode may last.
sara
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Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 8:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

when I react to free glutamates, my reaction tends to last 4 days. It is worse the second and third day.

So if it was me and I ate a lot of free glutamate on Saturday, Sunday and Monday would be really bad, Monday might be worse than Sunday, but I would still be reacting on Tuesday and Wednesday.

How long ago did you withdraw from benzos? and how long were you on? I am very sensitive to MSG / free glutamate for a similar reason. I have been off (ambien was the latest poison) for 27 months now and am not as sensitive as I was for the first year plus off.
LisaS
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Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 7:19 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You might be able to temper your reaction a little with 2 ibuprofen, 2-3 magnesium citrate capsules, 2-3 milk thistle capsules, one B complex vitamin that you know you do well with already. Taurine also is worth a try, and make sure your blood sugar is not low or high for the next few days -- protein and carbs together. Avoid anything with mercury (fish) and aluminum (any baking powder / baked goods you don't know the ingredients to).

Also it will take at least 2 weeks (in my experience) for the residual glutamate to get out of your system, even if you don't feel the reaction anymore (I call these the acute and chronic reactions), so any more provocation will produce a stronger reaction than it would have otherwise, so you may find yourself reacting to things you don't think have glutamate but they were just lower dose than you knew were a problem.
Pat
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Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 9:02 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lisa, Shouldn't "citrate" anything should be avoided by those with glutamate sensitivities?
AdaLovelace
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Posted on Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 6:27 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deb recommends magnesium orotate, and I believe magnesium malate to also be of high quality. Not sure about citrate...? It is, after all, bound to citric acid. Another thing that a lot of people recommend is bathing in epsom salts. That just seems more "natural" to me. People with sulfate sensitivities may need to be careful with that one though as epsom salts are comprised of magnesium sulfate. Magnesium chloride is an alternative that we can soak in. This is what is contained in the dead sea. (Read more here: http://magnesiumforlife.com/product-information/magnesium-chloride-vs-magnesium-sulfate/)

This is all too confusing for me, though, so I just try to eat healthy without supplementation. :-)
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Friday, October 19, 2012 - 4:06 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

An MSG reaction could last a week for me. Then I discovered ibuprofen, which can reverse them in minutes.
LisaS
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Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 8:22 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Our family has never reacted to citrate forms of vitamins nor citric acid. I usually use magnesium glycinate for our son, because the glycine can be helpful with glutamate (though Dr. Amy Yasko believes it can be a "fair weather friend" and excascerbate excitotoxicity...not that she is a good expert to go by in that area as her info is often outdated).

I have been using Mag citrate because it's recommended to help with oxalates which I have been struggling with, and have seen no increase in excitotoxicity from it.

But mainly I recommended it because (1) when you are talking about restaurant food, you probably aren't at a level of worrying about citrate, and (2) almost all health food stores have plain mag citrate and rarely straight other forms, around here anyway.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 7:43 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

LisaS, Milk thistle is very high in oxalates (which I avoid).
LisaS
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Posted on Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 9:06 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have been avoiding it also, but the latest spreadsheets on Trying_Low_Oxalate yahoo group list all of the milk thistle extracts and capsules as very low (2 capsules of Jarrow, for example, contain 0.02 mg of oxalate, and Whole Foods has 0.12).

Milk Thistle seed, though, is very high.

See http://lowoxalateinfo.com/why-are-the-low-oxalate-food-lists-so-inconsistent/.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Monday, October 29, 2012 - 5:26 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, LisaS!
LisaS
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Posted on Thursday, November 01, 2012 - 9:23 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let us know if you try it, Roy, and how effective it is for you. I'm thinking of switching my son and I from ibuprofen as our "go to" pill for incidental glutamate blocker. I don't like using ibuprofen on a regular basis but sometimes with a teen it's better than the alternative.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Friday, November 02, 2012 - 5:59 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've never found anything other than ibuprofen that was effective against an MSG reaction.
LisaS
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Posted on Monday, November 05, 2012 - 6:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Back when I wasn't very sensitive at all, I used to get migraines, which I assumed were from mercury. I would get them consistently in two situations:

1 - whenever I had an amalgam filling removed, even though they removed it "safely" (I had many so it was over quite a bit of time, with four crowns).

2- when I would eat at a particular sushi restaurant.

It turns out that #2 was MSG in the miso soup, and #2 probably was a combination of sodium bisulfite in the anesthetic plus a little mercury exposure. (which makes excitotoxic reactions much worse).

The only thing that would ever avoid these headaches was milk thistle, which I was taking because it is a liver tonic and I thought it helped my liver excrete the mercury, which I thought to be the problem. Now I think it was blocking excitotoxicity. However -- it was definitely more effective if I took it before the headache, rather than after. Ibuprofen wouldn't do much after it started, but I never tried it beforehand.

By the way, when I was researching glutamate blockers I read that there is apparently another substance that has been shown to be an effective glutamate antagonist, but not every state allows it even medicinally.
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2012 - 3:08 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, marijuana is said to be one, and glutamate blockers may be the answer for cancer:

http://www.pnas.org/content/98/11/5947.full

They are investigating a marijuana compound, cannabidiol, that appears to stop cancer, apparently unaware that it may be because of its glutamate blocking properties:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/19/marijuana-and-cancer_n_1898208.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009
Lorraine
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Posted on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 7:18 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Has anyone ever tried using white willow bark for headaches? I really don't want to start using alleve or advil everyday. Thats not good for other parts of the body. I have WWB in my cabinet but have been afraid to try it now for fear that it may cause a bad reaction in me. Still new to this and trying to figure out what exactly causes my reactions.
LisaS
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Posted on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 8:12 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have not found aspirin to help with the headache from glutamate. Try the milk thistle instead.

(One other thing I should have posted in the other thread...also watch for anything with aluminum, especially baking powder, and keep your blood sugar as even as possible...both hypoglycemia and heavy metals will make reactions much worse.)

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