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Delayed reactions to high free glutam...

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I've Just Made the MSG Connection" » Delayed reactions to high free glutamate foods « Previous Next »

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sparkler
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Posted on Thursday, June 10, 2010 - 8:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is it common to have delayed symptoms to eating foods containing high levels of free -glutamate?

It appears to me the worst symptoms are not instantaneous but appear from 12 hours to 24 hours after eating the suspect food. Has anyone else experienced this?
Kaye
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Posted on Friday, June 11, 2010 - 7:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sparkler - Yes, I often/usually have a delayed reaction time. So many times over the years, before I was aware that I was gultamate sensitive, I would wake up in the early mornings with a miserable headache that just got worse. Now, my first indication that I have eaten something bad is burning eyes, and this may not occur until evening for something I ate early in the day. Often times, my eyes hurt so bad that I cannot read or watch TV and have to go to bed in a dark room for relief. Depending on how much of the offending food I have eaten, the burning eyes often develop into a migraine. Hope this helps. Kaye
Kaye
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Posted on Friday, June 11, 2010 - 8:03 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sparkler - Yes, I often/usually have a delayed reaction time. So many times over the years, before I was aware that I was gultamate sensitive, I would wake up in the early mornings with a miserable headache that just got worse. Now, my first indication that I have eaten something bad is burning eyes, and this may not occur until evening for something I ate early in the day. Often times, my eyes hurt so bad that I cannot read or watch TV and have to go to bed in a dark room for relief. Depending on how much of the offending food I have eaten, the burning eyes often develop into a migraine.

I have only been aware of this site and on a Glutamate free diet since Sept. but have been able to decrease my daily headaches dramatically. If I only eat at home and choose my foods carefully, I can remain symptom free for weeks now. I get into trouble when I eat out, eat at someone's house, try to cook at home for guests or experiment with something new. Even then, if I have been careful at home, my reactions are less than in the past. I truly believe that FGA is like a toxin that builds up in our body and when we go over the limit is when we have trouble/reactions.
This website has been a godsend to me, who had almost daily headaches for approx 30 years. Hope this helps. Kaye
kristy
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Posted on Friday, June 11, 2010 - 12:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kaye, I agree that FGA is a toxin that builds up in our systems. I saw my children and myself go from extremely sensitive to all forms of glutamates (even natural ones) in the beginning to being able to eat bread and beef broth (cooked carefully) and tomato-based dishes. We are very careful as well and now only have bad reactions when we leave our comfort zone.

Here is a list of corn-free brands of common foods. It isn't absolutely up-to-date (it's almost impossible to keep it that way), but it is a good starting point. Any foods that are corn-free will be likely to be FGA-free since almost all the FGA-type additives are made from corn. http://corn-freefoods.blogspot.com/2007/12/corn-free-foods-products-list-dec-2007.html

Let me know if you are having trouble finding a safe brand or substitution for any of the foods that are giving you a problem. The combined brain power at the avoiding corn forum is pretty good at finding work-arounds to common corn problems.
James
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Posted on Monday, June 14, 2010 - 6:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One of the things that's most interesting to me when reading about other people's reactions is how common the "burning eyes" thing is. This is also my first indication that I've eaten something bad - my eyes start to sting and I get really tired. What I'm starting to realize, however, is that getting a handle on my diet is more difficult that I imagined as this happens sometimes when I least expect it.
Kaye
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Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 9:26 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My burning eyes got so bad that I consulted two different optometrists about it. They both treated me for dry eyes, but had never heard of a connection of burning eyes from something ingested. They absolutely did not think it was an allergic reation. Ironically, the many treatments for dry eyes did not help - changing my diet did. I suspect it also has something to do with the high eye pressure that I have. I am due to have that checked soon, and I will be sure to stay away from any high glutamate foods before I go in.
kristy
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Posted on Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 9:52 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

James, you should also take a look at your toiletries when eliminating fga additives. Sodium laurel sulphate is a particularly nasty ingredient that is absorbed through the skin. Citric acid is also a common ingredient in shampoos. Most people don't think about absorption thru skin contact, but everyone knows about medicated transdermal patches.

Once I got my diet clean, I started noticing problems after my shower. I made a clean sweep through my bathroom just like the one in the kitchen and started feeling better immediately.

I don't use a lot of products (I make most of my own) but I do buy pure olive oil soap and pure coconut oil soap from the farmers market to wash body and hair. We make deodorant from coconut oil, arrowroot powder and baking soda and find it much more effective. We brush with baking soda or coconut soap. I also use coconut oil for moisturizer. I don't really use any other toiletries - I have always been a natural person.

I also react when I have to pump gas or sit in traffic (exhaust) - it's worse if I have my windows down or ventilation on fresh air - it's a habit now to keep it on "recirculate". I am careful about shaking hands, too - so many people use the antiseptic wipes or gels. New clothing in stores is also problematic for me. I never realized how much these things off-gas before I got my diet clean.
Mariann
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Posted on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 - 6:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When I have an offending food, the migraine starts at about 8 hours later. Preceeded by sinus pressure, neck ache, eyes tender, tired tired tired. My mood tanks followed by nausea and then the migraine. Now after getting 3 to 4 migraines a week for some time, I have improved greatly. I had one in April and l in May. As most of you know I lost my husband on May 31, so it is hard to remember to eat, the old hunger thing is missing a bit. But I am beginning to pay attention and have been reading the posts. When I finally got rid of the headaches every 7 to 10 days it was because I eliminated toiletries and toothpaste. I now use only goats milk soap from the farmer's market and plain dawn dish det. works for me, as well as baking soda for teeth. I am getting stronger and walking more and more so I am feeling like myself a bit more. Love the banter that goes on here. Mariann
James
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Posted on Monday, June 21, 2010 - 8:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, you make some great points. I have to go raid my bathroom now. I've switched to baking soda for tooth brushing, but I never considered shampoo, etc. I'm pretty sure citric acid is a no-no for me though, just yesterday I had a few swallows of a soda from Whole Foods that looked pretty clean (label) except for the aforementioned ingredient and today has been... well... not so great. Not sure if it was the soda, but I was ok before and that's the only thing I did differently. I only drank about half of it, too. It's terrible, I just WANTED that soda! I guess I'll need to control myself from now on. This is one of those things that I crave which I just can't have.

Kaye, it's funny you mention this because my wife experienced something that sounds very similar. She had been using lubricating drops and had a prescription for Restasis. She has always blamed the dry eyes on contacts. Anyway, with me being so careful about my diet, she spent about 4 or 5 days eating more carefully just by eating what I was making for myself and she noticed that her eyes weren't dry anymore! Now, she doesn't stick to the diet as well as I try to, so she's on and off of her drops, but we can definitely say that free glutamate causes problems for her in that respect. Then again, my symptoms are much more severe and I have kidney issues as well where she's mostly healthy. I guess the incentive isn't there for her, the allure of junk food is just too strong :-)

I'm glad to hear things are looking up for you Mariann. The information you offered totally reinforces Kristy's previous post and this is very helpful. The "tired" is a killer. My mood was not so bad today, but my eyes stinging and being tired... it was all I could do to stay awake and I couldn't focus on ANYTHING. I don't usually suggest that I can identifiy with someone's experience like this, but I think I can relate to many of your symptoms.

Thanks for the suggestions!
Deb A.
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Posted on Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 8:11 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nature's Gate baby shampoo works for me just fine. For soda, we ordered a Soda Club fountain jet on line. It comes with the bottles and CO2 cylinders. It's so easy and cheap to make your own soda. We add fresh lemon or grapefruit juice and sweetener of choice like cane sugar or stevia...it's even good with just a little juice and no sugar. I like to mix some dry ginger or grated fresh with sugar and then add the soda..add slowly or it fizzes over the glass. We have pureed just about every fruit with sugar and then used that as the base. I make a chocolate syrup from our book, and mix it with ice and milk and soda...great and refreshing.
James
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Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - 8:53 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wonder if anyone who is sensitive to citric acid has tried eating iceberg lettuce that was washed in a containing solution. I'm still trying to find a local source for leafy greens, but it seems to me that if the lettuce is just "sprayed", then once you got past the outer layers you may be OK. Not that you'd be 100% clear of the citric acid, but that it would be so little at that point that maybe you could eat it (???). I tried this today, I should know within a few hours if I'm OK. There's nothing else but raw apple cider vinegar and organic olive oil on my salad, I think a reaction would be damning for the lettuce.

On the other hand, I seem to remember seeing that iceberg lettuc is "bathed" to wash, so it might be that it was essentially soaked in a citric acid and I'm doomed. The company (earthbound farms) has told me specifically that they use citric acid on their organic crops.
Di
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Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - 2:50 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unless you are sensitive to the something in the vinegar, like sulphites.
James
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Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - 3:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are there sulphites in apple cider vinegar? That would be bad, I actually switched to raw apple cider vinegar to AVOID sulphites :-(
Roy Piwovar
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Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - 4:30 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The article linked below says that some apple cider vinegars contain sulfites:

http://g6pddeficiency.org/index.php?cmd=researchviewarticle&id=6
DebA.
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Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - 4:32 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's best to buy organic apple cider vinegar. Even if a vinegar label doesn't say it contains sulfites, it's usually present if it's not organic. It does not have to be labeled if it is not at a certain parts per million. And some foods like mayo and potato products do not need to have sulfites labeled. I eat romaine lettuce most of the time since I have had some bad luck with iceberg. Let us know how you do, okay James?
James
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Posted on Thursday, June 24, 2010 - 11:56 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the replies. I'm using Spectrum Organic Unfiltered, Unpasteurized Apple Cider Vinegar. I hope this is safe, if not I have to figure out something else to put on my salad, once I figure out whether I can eat THAT. :-) Yes, it's all getting a little frustrating. Honestly, I think I might be OK with the iceberg lettuce. My wife ate the first few "layers", I've been eating the rest. I'm going to give it a few days and go through two heads of it to see if I notice any correlation between consumption and symptoms. To be honest, I'm not having the best week anyway, so it's hard to tell what's going on. I need to get back to feeling good first, then see how I do with it. I think the only thing that I can count on not bothering me is the organic chicken that we get from Wegman's :-)
ali
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Posted on Thursday, June 24, 2010 - 12:56 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

James, im in Ireland and here we can get organic balsamic vinegar that i do okay with. But i cant for the life of me find organic apple cider vinegar here and i react to the regular. Have you tried growing your own lettuces? I havent as yet, but plan to. Im told they are easy to grow in containers.My friend has three old wine boxes she uses and has a constant supply through summer growing on her balcony. Just a thought. Ali
kristy
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Posted on Thursday, June 24, 2010 - 10:58 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sprouting baby greens is also an option if you don't have a sunny place for a container garden.
Nana
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Posted on Friday, June 25, 2010 - 3:23 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, how do you do the sprouting?
kristy
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Posted on Sunday, June 27, 2010 - 7:34 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nana, I sprout seeds for my chicken for the boost in nutrition and as a change from whole grain oats and wheat. She loves barley and rye sprouted, but she doesn't like milo whole or sprouted. :-( I find it entertaining to see what she likes and what she will walk away from. I feed her a huge variety including leftovers and fermented vegetables.

I follow the same procedure detailed here: http://www.ourbigearth.com/2008/08/20/food-your-family-guest-foodies-krista-johnstons-sprouts-growing-tutorial/
You can find lots of organic seeds and sprouting equipment online here: http://www.sprouthouse.com/

BTW, I use the mason jar for small amounts for my chicken, but if you want to sprout baby greens, you may be better off getting a tray type sprouter.
Nana
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Posted on Sunday, June 27, 2010 - 6:08 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Kristy!

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