Topics Topics Edit Profile Profile Help/Instructions Help    
Search Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Tartaric Acid

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Tartaric Acid « Previous Next »

Author Message
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 12:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, i have a question. Does tartaric acid contain free glutamate? I ask because i made a cake for my daughters birthday yesterday. I put jam on the cake. When i went to look for jam in the store i remembered having read that pectin wasnt good. So i found a locally made jam. The ingredients list read sugar, strawberry, tartaric acid. Happy to see no pectin on the label i bought it. My youngest daughter Isla ate some of the cake. Now 24 hours later she is charging around, screaming and inconsolable. She has had a strong reaction to something and the only new thing she has eaten is the jam. If anyone has any info on Tartaric Acid safety id much appreciate your input. Looks like im in for a sleepless night. We had been doing so well with her.... Ali
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 2:11 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Eee. i feel for you ali...your daughter too. poor little thing, she must be feeling miserable! how awful.

i dont know anything about it either. is tartaric acid the same thing as the 'cream of tartar' which is used in Snickerdoodle cookies?
all i know about that is it comes from some substance that builds up on the inside of wine barrels, and has been in use as such for hundreds of years... of course, as with milk and cheese and breads (or even for that matter meats and fruits and vegies) i suppose any number of processing changes might have adulturated yet another perfectly good cooking ingredient!
i look forward to hearing what you find out
Star
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 2:29 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yes, I found that tartaric acid (active ingredient in Creme of tartar) is in a lot of baking powder. "Cream of tartar is best known in our kitchens for helping stabilize and give more volume to beaten egg whites. It is the acidic ingredient in some brands of baking powder." I find that if baking powder has creme of tartar in it, I REACT big time, similar to a MSG like reaction. Links have been made between tartaric acid and autism, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. I felt waaaaay better as soon as I eliminated this stuff :-)
Star
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 2:32 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/home/eng/fibromyalgia.asp
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 3:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

AY CARAMBA! we bake lots of muffins at home! my son is in the Spectrum! i am autoimmune!
i am going to check my baking powder RIGHT NOW!!

thank you Star!! :0
Ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 11:03 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

wow. thankyou so much for your posts Bonana and Star. Ive just read the link. That explains her reaction to the jam. She does react to baking powder too. The jam is in the bin!! She has calmed now and slept for a couple of hours. She is just a bit listless and fretful now so i think she is over the worst of it. Thanks again Ali.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 11:25 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi again. I have just realised that i dont have a cold and that the sinusy headachy feeling with aching shoulders is also a reaction to the tartaric acid. It also explains why i often feel like this after visiting a friend who bakes fantastic cakes.
Star, what do you use in place of baking powder? I used a self raising flour in my cake and ive just checked and of course there is tartaric acid in that too. Is bicarbonate of soda okay?
ali
Mariann
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 9:45 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ali you are right about the self rising flour, you have no control over what is in it. You can use baking soda and either lemon or organic apple cider vinegar to cause a rising situation. Baking powder is a real problem for me. Deb has a great recipe for pumpkin bread in here book and a recipe for yellow cake that is very gooe. When I make her pumpkin bread I use only the baking soda and it is so moist and good anyway. If you make it like a cake it is sort of a spice cake like the old days. So good for you too. I am so sorry to hear about the cake incident. But you are one step closer to eliminating sneaky problems. This season try to get some berries, blue, ras, or straw and make the quick freezer jam. I did it last season and it is very good. I bought some cream of tartar to make the baking powder substitute in the book, but have been leary because it has sulphite implications. I guess I will pass on that one and stay with the baking soda substitute. Mariann
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 10:00 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do much better without the cream of tartar, too. I use baking soda for baked goods. If you use an acidic dairy product like clabbered milk, sour cream, yogurt, kefir or buttermilk as the liquid, it will make baked goods rise better than baking powder anyway.

bo'nana, if your son is in the spectrum, you really need to read the GAPS book: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0954852001?ie=UTF8&tag=arcbit-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0954852001
It is amazing and makes so much sense. You can probably find it in your local library. The link to the Yahoo Group I gave out before is a forum support group for people following the GAPS diet. Read the book to see what it is all about.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 12:42 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Again, it has to do with our individual degrees of sensitivity. Sulfites are regularly sprayed on wine grapes in California and elsewhere. Residues must end up in some of the tartaric acid or cream of tartar sold in the U.S. Here's a good substitute. For every teaspoon of baking powder called for, substitute 1/2 t. baking soda plus 1 and 1/2 teaspoons (3 to 1 ratio) fresh or organic lemon juice or organic apple cider vinegar. OR as Kristy said, use an acidic dairy product or acidic fruit like applesauce as part of the liquid.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 1:48 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thankyou all so much for your tips. Rosie is having a birthday party at the weekend so i will be baking another cake. Ill try out the baking soda and lemon juice and let you know how i go. Im a good enough cook with the savoury food, but baking isnt my forte!! Ill keep practising!! We have had some "interesting" biscuits and breads......it can only get better and my efforts keep the family highly amused,. :-)
Ill try the acidic dairy too Kirsty. Thanks everyone. Id be quite lost without you all and this site. Its so nice to get to know people that understand the food issues we have with isla. x
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 2:35 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hee hee, ali, that takes me back to my moms famous "Something Cake" (:

well, i checked my baking powder... Rumford "Premium Aluminum-Free" (double acting/ gluten free). listed ingredients are: Monocalcium Phosphate-Bicarbonate of Soda-Cornstarch (from nongenetically modified corn).

initially i was pretty relieved... but on further reflection, i found a couple more angles to ponder
a) so mine doesnt have this particular ingred... but does that necessarily mean it is "safe"?
as far as i can tell, none of us have any issues with corn- but even so, what is 'monocalcium phosphate'?
i have wondered about the tricalcium phosphate found in milks and creamers in the past, and suspected reactions to it. the mono- variety has to be something similar, right?

b) if the cheaper baking powders generally do have tartaric acid, and since mass foods producers typically try to shave costs off their bottom line wherever possible, what should that suggest about the type of baking powder likely to be in storebought bakery items... like the 'fresh made' muffins and bagels the kids and i were enjoying every morning on the way to school (until last week anyway, when i discovered this site :-)

wow... who knew we would have to become 'food chemists' just to try to stay (somewhat) healthy?

well, after the first several days of misery off the old not-so-healthy 'healthy' diet (withdrawals i suppose?), i can truthfully say that i have been feeling some better again... no more tummy upsets, maybe a little less foggy too...

i think i am going to have to ditch the Rumsford- it is made by Clabber Girl anyway, i guess that should have been another red flag- and try these great suggestions for raising acidity the old fashioned way.
hubby never has 'felt right' after eating muffins of any kind... wont it be interesting if that changes once i make the switch?
thanks everyone for some more great advice!

(o btw... about grapes, Deb... QFC just had a 99c sale on grapes and i dont usually buy from chile becoz of the pesticides, but that was such a good price i thought maybe this time and i would just wash them real well. Oh No! you should have seen the BROWN POWDER all over the grapes at the store! it was revolting!! i left the package wide open thinking the yucky sight would be adequate deterrent... wouldnt you know, as soon as i walked away, another customer came up & bought the bag... eeww.)
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 11:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

bonana, i have no idea what monocalcium phospate is.Maybe someone else will have an idea as to what it is?
Isla reacts to all "fresh made" bakery items. I used to grab her a criossant or roll at the start of our supermarket trip, now i hand her a banana at the veg aisle to keep her happy in the trolley seat.

I know what you mean about becoming a food chemist. Ive learned more about food in the last few months than in the last 39 years!!! But knowledge is power and that can only be a good thing!! Generally speaking if its got none food items on the ingredients list i dont buy or eat it.
I had withdrawals the first couple of weeks too....i found it very hard going. I didnt much attribute my mood to that at the time, i thought i was just overwhelmed with all the cooking and label reading. Looking back now i can see that after a couple of weeks that curtain lifted quite dramatically and my moods are pretty level now day to day and things that would have stressed me out just dont seem the hassles they once did. Im still astounded to find food could have been having such an impact on me and my family.

Glad to hear you are starting to feel better Bonana. I hope you continue to feel better the further on with this journey you go. Ali x
Mariann
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2010 - 6:48 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bo I had to ditch the Rumford Baking Powder, I think I read that it can have cornstarch in it. Even if we don't necessarily have a problem with corn per say, the high processing of cornstarch can surely free of glutamic acid. So now I use just the baking soda trick that Deb just mentioned and I am doing fine with my cakes. I never was a baker, but have always liked cooking. Just didn't like not having time to do it was the problem. I now know that you can't "find" the time you need to "make" the time. I don't mean to imply that it is easy to do that, because it isn't, but when you start to win and feel better, it becomes self perpetuating. I like to just be creative, but I find with baking, I have to be more precise. That has not been a bad think to work on. It is kind of fun. I bought some little glass dishes (really little) at the Dollar store. I measure each of my ingredients into one, you should have probably 4 or 5 of them. You know salt in one, cinnamin and nutmeg in another and so on. I feel like a chef just dumping them in after I am sure my measurements are right. I tend ot go off and daydream while I am cooking so this keeps me on track with ing. amounts and of course not forgetting any. I did get some non alcohol containing vanilla, because I read that it is probably from corn. I just left it out until I found one I can use. It is not organic, but it is just vanilla, no alcohol so I am going to use it and see. I have in fact become a good baker, I just never gave myself time or belief to do it. Anyway I didn't eat treats back then. God forbid I should eat sweets or bread even. I was always on a low carb, low sugar, low fat diet and every year I weighed about 6 or 7 more pound. Now as many of you have read in my posts I have lost 44 pounds and counting in the 3 years that I have been doing this. My plan is to buy some imported Polish Vodka (that is what was stipulated in the recipe) and get some vanilla beans from Amazon, you just need a couple. In a month or two I will have a ton of vanilla and it will be really cheaper than that tiny little bitty bottle I can buy. I may even give it as Christmas Presents this coming year. Have a great day to all you pioneers. Yes I know what you mean about this site. A while back the site was down and i felt so out there, so alone in this problem. Thank God Mike came to the rescue and got it up and running again. Big hug Mike. Mariann Oh and Ali make sure the flour you use is not self rising, doesn't contain malted barley flour, is not enriched or bleached. Sorry for the task, but we want the little ones to be as safe as possible. Also I read here that the only safe Baking Powder was Featherweight I believe.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2010 - 8:29 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mariann, you'll have to tell us about your vanilla project...let us know how to make it, okay?? And I will pass that hug on to Mike. :-)
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2010 - 11:41 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We dont get featherweight here. I cant find a safe baking powder locally. Col is in Navan, our nearest city, tonight. There is a huge supermarket there. He has instructions to buy plain organic flour, bicarbonate of soda and lemons. Ill let you know how we go with the next cake Mariann. Ali
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2010 - 1:23 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ali, for my daughter's birthday the first year we were doing this, I used the cake recipe in Deb's book and made it lemon flavored with her modifications. I also made a frosting with homemade powdered sugar and lemon juice/zest. Once it was frosted, I cut cherries in half and made a flower on top using half cherries and blueberries. I also made a border around the bottom using alternating cherries and blueberries. It was beautiful and she loved it very much. I used to make elaborate cakes with all kinds of artificial colorings and candy, but this one was much more appreciated because we had stopped eating sweets all the time with our change in lifestyle. I also served it with homemade vanilla ice cream so she was very happy.

BTW, my son requested a huge cookie for his birthday cake. Bar cookies and Blondies are now their favorite sweet and they are super easy.
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2010 - 1:39 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

wow that sounds amazing Kirsty. I will give it a try and let you know how i go. Great idea to decorate with fruit. Both the girls love their fruit so that should go down well.
The kids are both getting so few treats these days the ones they do get they appreciate so much more. Last Friday they shared a packet of plain salted walkers crisps and had some organic chocolate. They were so happy and greatful. I see other kids that get the flavoured crisps and sweets daily and expect it. I find it hard to watch little ones eating such stuff all day every day. Friday is generally treat day in our house. Even before our dietary changes, sweets and crisps were a Friday thing. Thanks for the cake ideas Kirsty. Ill let you k now how i go. ali
Star
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2010 - 7:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks so much everyone for your posts. I had no idea to how to make baked goods without baking powder, but I am going to try the ideas shared here. I just new that everytime I ate this particular potato pancake my husband made with baking powder I felt awful afterwards!! And not when I would just eat the potatoes... I just recently found out that not all baking powders have the tartaric acid in it... so when I have time I am going to research brands, and will post for all what I find...

re: monocalcium phosphate: I believe is the active ingredient in baking soda that causes things to rise
I as well have avoided tricalcium phosphate, because I didn't know what it was...
I found this on this site:
http://www.fitsugar.com/Label-Able-Tricalcium-Phosphate-1570001

"tricalcium phosphate is calcium salt of citric acid. It's added to foods to act as a firming or anti-caking agent, or as an acidity regulator. Companies also add it to their products to increase the calcium content (Dannon told me this when I phoned them). That's why calcium supplements sometimes contain tricalcium phosphate as well. You may find this ingredient in foods such as dairy products, wine, carbonated beverages, powdered spices, candy and jams. Reduced fat liquid foods may also contain this ingredient, to add smoothness and an opaque color.

Want to hear more about this ingredient? Then read more.

The funny thing is, Dannon Fruit Blends Yogurt (which contains tricalcium phosphate) has 20 percent calcium, and Stonyfield Farms Fat Free Yogurt (which doesn't contain this ingredient), has 30 percent calcium. If tricalcium phosphate is being added to increase the amount of calcium, then shouldn't Dannon have more? It just doesn't make sense. Also, it seems that tricalcium phosphate is used in a lot of processed foods that contain some not-so-healthy ingredients (what's with the red 40 and high fructose corn syrup in the Dannon yogurt?). So for that reason, I think I'll stick to foods made with actual food ingredients."
ali
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 06, 2010 - 12:24 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Star,Im baffled as to why a lot of food contains this stuff when further along the shelf another brand of the same thing doesnt!! Ive just about given up on packets!! I have a few trusted things but only a month ago i fed Isla potato faces that were previously just potato and vegetable oil. She went red within minutes and when i checked the packet, it was a new improved recipe. That little word spices was there...doesnt take a genious to work out what the spice was!!!! I now read the label every single time just to be sure they havent "improved" their recipe!!! Its infuriating when that happens and it happens often.
ali
bo'nana
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 06, 2010 - 6:05 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

o boy that goes for me too! ...ive just had a bizarre reaction to plain old strawberries, nothing even on the label (which ive posted under Unsafe Foods i Have Tried)
probly more & more 'new, improved' processing strategies all the time now too...
sure wish they would just leave well enouh alone... arrgh.
Deb A.
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 06, 2010 - 8:37 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Strawberries, if not organic, are sprayed with more pesticides than almost any other fruit. It's good to wait until the local fruit is available and ask farmers what is sprayed on them. They're easy to grow in pots. This year I made a berry patch in a circle 6 feet across. We planted 5 blueberry plants (different varieties for better pollination) and added a large pot of strawberry plants in the center. We have pine trees, so we had worked some of the needles into the soil and mulched the rest of the circle with the needles for the blueberries, which like acidic soil, not native here. I plan to sprinkle every month with some azalea food, which is acidic...hope they do well. If the birds tend to attack the berries, we plan to buy some netting. We had a huge pine tree removed which left a huge spot out back. We just finished planting pumpkins and winter squash there..the grandkids will love the pumpkin patch this fall. We had planned to sell and find a single story, but nothing has the yard size we need. Since the fire, this is basically a completely renovated home, so we will stay and enjoy it and the yard for awhile. Love this time of year! Hope all of you are enjoying it.
kristy
Unregistered guest
Posted on Thursday, May 06, 2010 - 1:52 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Frozen fruit and vegetables are often dusted with cornstarch to keep them from sticking together. Also, berries in the produce section are often sitting on top of a citric acid soaked pad inside a plastic container (which is a plastic made from corn, BTW).
carolh
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, May 09, 2010 - 11:31 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Great ideas, Deb!

Blueberries help protect the Blood Brain Barrier. I think I will plant a berry garden too!

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Post as "Anonymous"
Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Administration Administration Log Out Log Out   Previous Page Previous Page Next Page Next Page