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Wet / Dry Aged Beef

Battling the MSG Myth » "Help! I Have a Question" » Wet / Dry Aged Beef « Previous Next »

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MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009 - 12:24 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm looking back through my food diary.

About 3 months ago, I noted I got very dizzy woozy after eating a "wet/dry aged rib-eye" at a very fancy steak house. During that time, I had beenVERY SLOW COOKED BLACK BEANS (12+ hours).

At the time, my then-hypothesis was candida so I thought my bad reaction may have been caused by the inherent mold involved in aging beef.

Now, looking back with MSG in mind, I suspect that the inherent process of aging involves breaking down protein, and I suspect, liberates free glutamic acid.

Or, I supposed, they could have had MSG in the seasonings, although I made a big point about asking for it plain & unseasoned, and it was a fancy steak place, so I wonder if MSG is used less in fancy places.

Whatta u think?

Mike
kristy
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Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009 - 1:53 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mike, If I am not mistaken, curing meat is similar to fermentation so I would say that the longer meat is aged the more likely to get a reaction. And, how much do you want to bet that they coat it with a "bacteria inhibitor" like citric acid before aging? I have problems with legumes if cooked for long periods so that could have been the culprit as well.
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009 - 3:44 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kristy, I suspect you are 100% correct.

Looking back over the last 11 months, there were specific episodes which I remember vividly.

I remember with great clarity being on the bathroom floor 2am, sweating, trembling with severe abdominal pain after eating chicken alfredo with MSG at Spaghetti Warehouse. At the time, I thought my problem was corn. When I called the next day, fully expecting cornstarch to be in the sauce, I was confused and disappointed.

It looks like the worst reactions for me were when I explicitly had MSG, or hydrolyzed beans or chicken/beef for 12-18 hour cook times. The absolute worst was the corned beef brisket for 12 hours in my crock pot.

Looking back, I now cringe.

Mike
EmilyS
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Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009 - 4:21 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, fancy places use MSG as well. However, some of the fancy restaurants are more likely to honor a special request and cook a "clean steak." However, beans cooked for 12 hours would guarantee a severe reaction for me.

Your memories of episodes brought back memories for me too. I remember being in college after eating packaged curry on a date (I checked the label but it was all in Chinese and took a blind leap that it was safe). At 2am I woke up with intense stomach pain. I went into the bathroom with the intense stomach pains, chest pains and sweating and woke up on the floor with a bruised jaw, forehead and face. I passed out from the pain and landed on the sink, then bathtub (I promised I have only passed out twice in my life, that time and then last month).

I woke up with no eye sight- I was completely blind. I remember crawling down the hallway screaming at my roommates with complete fear. I was blind, with a beat up face and experiencing the most intense pain I have ever experienced.

I later learned that when your body is in pain, all blood goes to the source of pain and your body will sometimes pull the blood from your eyes causing you to go blind while it deals with the source of pain.

I learned a life lesson that day to never guess that a food is safe. I later learned that products second ingredient was MSG.

That was 9 years ago and luckily I've only had one other serious reaction like that when I made the same mistake to assume a food was safe where I hadn't checked the label. That day I was worried I wouldn't live through the reaction.

I recommitted myself to never guess on safe foods and to respect the fact that if I wasn't extremely careful, MSG could kill me. I'm so grateful for this site and for all of your knowledge that has helped each of us live regular, pain free lives.
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009 - 4:33 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OMG: that's terrible. When did you first put 2+2+2 together and figure out it was MSG? (Sounds like before college).

The other day, I was chatting with a friend of mine who mentioned he had a problem with MSG. When he was in college, he ate at a Chinese food buffet, shortly after, he developed breathing problems in class, passed out, rushed to the hospital, where they diagnosed an accute MSG reaction.

He's never eaten at a Chinese food buffet again :-)

Mike
EmilyS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, October 27, 2009 - 11:54 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I started reacting at age 17 and made the connection at 19, about a year into college.

I just realized that after all these years I've never posted my story. I'll type something up and post my full recovery story in that section in this forum.
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, October 27, 2009 - 12:14 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Please do, I like reading stories of how people arrived at MSG
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 5:58 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are there any sulfites relevant to wet/dry aged beef?

BTW, I checked with the steak house and they say only salt/pepper on the steak.

I don't think I've ever reacted to salt.

Thanks,
Mike
Jennifer
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 9:36 am:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Federal law prohibits the use of sulfites on meats, except for certain shellfish items.

Assuming the law is being followed...

I'm a carnivore and do fairly well with most cuts of meat. Many steaks at restaurants come frozen, and may have hydrolyzed broth or other additives. A nice prime rib may have Dijon mustard or white wine added, which would have sulfites. You need to ask to know for sure.

Jennifer
MikeS
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 - 6:00 pm:   Delete PostPrint Post   Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Jennifer.

I had read that sulfites couldn't be added to "red meat" which at the time left me wondering if it could be added to chicken, pork, etc.

Based on this response I got from the Naked Juice folks about their Green Machine juice, it sounds like if it's greater than 10 ppm it must be labeled:

Michael:

We appreciate the opportunity to respond to your concerns about Naked Juice Green Machine Smoothie. We do not directly add sulfites yet some of the ingredients may very well contain trace amounts.

We can tell you if a product contains greater than 10 parts per million (by weight) of sulfites, it will be stated on the label as 'contains sulfites'. This is required by FDA.

I hope this information is helpful, Michael.

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